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Thread: Staking tent on tundra

  1. #1
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    Default Staking tent on tundra

    I've never camped on tundra before, and looking for some advise for staking down the tent. I assume the tundra will be too soft to hold normal stakes down in high wind, so what is the best way to secure the tent? Rocks inside the tent at corners and deadman the guylines? Or are there better tundra stakes to use?

    Thanks

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    If you can find rocks, rock the stakes, go in at a steep angle and really grind them in with your foot. Use all the guy lines. I've tied down to the short little bushes on the tundra as well.
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    a2thak:

    BRWNBR hit the proverbial stake on the head. In my experience, I've survived some hellacious winds when hunkered in VE-25's, by utilizing every guy-line and rocking every stake.

    If there's anything I can add to BRWNBR's post, it would be to say that you should pay really close attention to where you place a tent and when doing so, be sure to put it in a spot that affords the best possible wind protection.

    Back about 1972, I had a tent go to pieces on me while on a sheep hunt and camped beneath Hut Peak in GMU 14C, because I set it up where I had a spectacular view out the front door. Of course, a big three-day September storm came in and blew the thing to pieces.

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    Kifaru makes two different size tundra stakes that are 6061 alum and work very well in tundra and sand.


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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Yes mav, location location location!!
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    I had a rain fly trashed in high winds on my first trip to the AK Peninsula. I echo what the others said and if you can find a wind break in some alders you can also tie off to them. I too use every guy line on my VE-25.

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    I echo what above posters have said. Location location. I once set up my camp as we watched a storm approaching from the south. We planned and prepped for it. Then watched as it harmlessly blew to the east. Then as the storm got north of us the wind switched direction and decimated our little camp.

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    I use MSR Cyclones and in poor ground I will double stake, use a stake to help spread the load and pull. I use any available brush or alders and try to get out of the wind, but high enough not to get caught in rising water. If you do use rocks, make sure that in high wind that the rocks don't rub holes in your tent,, Don't ask me how I know.

    I have buried a log, or any thing to act as an anchor to act as a deadman a few times as well, in very poor holding tundra.

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    I use EMT cut to the length I want. Low cost and durable, weights a bit more than alum.

  10. #10

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    When weight is not an issue I've used two foot long screw anchors. The only time I've had an issue with them is on spring bear hunts where the ground is still too frozen to screw them in. You can usually find them at hardware stores.

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    This thread caused me to relive last August when I was caught in a 5-day nasty storm on a caribou hunt. I was camped on an exposed mountain side far above any alders. It was tundra, but there were literally rocks everywhere. No stake went in without a struggle. Longer stakes/conduit would have been pointless. I rocked down everything I could and the wind still beat hell out of things. My Sawtooth held. Someday archaeologists will find my campsite and note the oval ring of 20 pound stones.

    MSR Cyclone pegs are worth their cost and more. They hold great. Use every stake possible and bring 6 extra in case. Rock it down early. Don't wait for the wind which prefers to arrive after midnight. Don't ask me how I learned that lesson...just do it and be done. Don't camp in the open if better choices exist. I had a guy sew a sod flap around the base of my Sawtooth this summer. I have every intention of using it to keep the wind out and help secure the shelter.

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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Default Staking tent on tundra

    Quote Originally Posted by stid2677 View Post
    I use MSR Cyclones and in poor ground I will double stake, use a stake to help spread the load and pull. I use any available brush or alders and try to get out of the wind, but high enough not to get caught in rising water. If you do use rocks, make sure that in high wind that the rocks don't rub holes in your tent,, Don't ask me how I know.

    I have buried a log, or any thing to act as an anchor to act as a deadman a few times as well, in very poor holding tundra.

    https://www.rei.com/product/829839/m...-stakes-4-pack
    ^^^^This. I have also had very good luck with the Cyclones. Amazon has some 10" Cyclone knock-offs that work just as good and are much cheaper.


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    I like 12 inch sand stakes...heavy but awesome. They are a 12 inch nail with a plate welded to them.
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    Quote Originally Posted by sep View Post
    I had a rain fly trashed in high winds on my first trip to the AK Peninsula. I echo what the others said and if you can find a wind break in some alders you can also tie off to them. I too use every guy line on my VE-25.
    One thing I started doing after a few real long nights riding out some hella windstorms and having a couple tent poles break on the 6 man Cabelas guide tents, was to start propping up something as tall as I could find as close to the height of the guy location, be it a tree branch, caribou shed, walking pole, etc..., securing it to the top of that and then bringing the guy line down to the ground or wherever.....usually the problem is solved.

    When the angle of the guy line is at such an extreme angle to the ground all they do is hold down the tent but really does nothing to keep the wind from bending in the tent poles. When you prop something up high enough to keep that guy directly into the wind instead of at an angle it really makes a huge difference....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    ......... be it a tree branch, caribou shed, walking pole, etc..., securing it to the top of that and then bringing the guy line down to the ground or wherever.....

    When the angle of the guy line is at such an extreme angle to the ground ....... really does nothing to keep the wind from bending in the tent poles. When you prop something up high enough to keep that guy directly into the wind instead of at an angle it really makes a huge difference....
    The advice that was mentioned by Former Guide is very important.

    As an example -- of which I'm not particularly fond of revealing -- was when I was in the upper reaches of Moose Creek (Seward, Alaska) and chasing some truly huge Dall rams (circa 1979).

    A high intensity four-day storm blew in off The Gulf and busted all tent poles. So, I inserted all sorts of things inside the tent to keep it off my face while I tried to ride things out for a few days. One object happened to be my pre-64 Model 70 Winchester. However, when a freight-train gust came along on Day-Three of the storm, it loosened everything and the rifle came down across my nose (literally). Bone crunched and blood flowed.

    A handy-dandy sodden wool sock, complete with toe-jam stench, staved the blood flow.

    Needless to say, I was glad to get going back toward the railroad tracks when the rain seemed to subside, busted nose and all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Maverick940 View Post
    However, when a freight-train gust came along on Day-Three of the storm, it loosened everything and the rifle came down across my nose (literally). Bone crunched and blood flowed.
    OUCH...!!! That makes my eyes water just thinkin' about it...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Maverick940 View Post
    The advice that was mentioned by Former Guide is very important.

    As an example -- of which I'm not particularly fond of revealing -- was when I was in the upper reaches of Moose Creek (Seward, Alaska) and chasing some truly huge Dall rams (circa 1979).

    A high intensity four-day storm blew in off The Gulf and busted all tent poles. So, I inserted all sorts of things inside the tent to keep it off my face while I tried to ride things out for a few days. One object happened to be my pre-64 Model 70 Winchester. However, when a freight-train gust came along on Day-Three of the storm, it loosened everything and the rifle came down across my nose (literally). Bone crunched and blood flowed.

    A handy-dandy sodden wool sock, complete with toe-jam stench, staved the blood flow.

    Needless to say, I was glad to get going back toward the railroad tracks when the rain seemed to subside, busted nose and all.
    I sure hope you didn't beat up that nice 'ol pre-64 too bad. Now that would be a crying shame.

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    umm....

    I know that different locations require different tools, but I can't be the only person who doesn't even bring stakes into the mountains, can I. My stakes live in a little bag at the bottom of a box in the garage. They are mint condition.

    I guy my tent out to 20 lb rocks.

    I know that theoretically I might not be able to find rocks. Practically, If I'm above tree line I can find rocks.

  20. #20

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    Large stakes like snow stakes sometimes work really well. Best bet is to always camp near a good supply of rocks though.

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