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Thread: trophy brook trout

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    Default trophy brook trout

    I was taking a look at the catch and release certificate program on AF&G website recently and noticed that the minimum for a brook trout to be considered a trophy is 20 inches. is it possible to find a brook trout anywhere near that in this state?

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    Quote Originally Posted by nate907 View Post
    I was taking a look at the catch and release certificate program on AF&G website recently and noticed that the minimum for a brook trout to be considered a trophy is 20 inches. is it possible to find a brook trout anywhere near that in this state?
    I believe there are only small populations of brook trout in certain lakes in SE Alaska. Apparently they were released into these lakes to provide more fishing opportunities for residents of that area, but fish and game monitors those populations carefully to make sure they don't spread and become an invasive species into the rest of the state. So unless you are planning on going to SE Alaska, you probably aren't going to be catching any brookies any time soon. They are a very beautiful fish. I used to catch them growing up as a kid in Northern Michigan. They are actually a char and not a trout. Similar to Dolly Varden and Lake Trout. They have light spots on a dark background as opposed to dark spots on a light-colored background like true trout and salmon. Their light spots also have brilliant colors of red and blue inside of them. In my opinion they are one of the prettiest fish there are, but they generally don't get as big as other trout. I think a 20 inch brookie would be a hog.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bushwhack Jack View Post
    I believe there are only small populations of brook trout in certain lakes in SE Alaska. Apparently they were released into these lakes to provide more fishing opportunities for residents of that area, but fish and game monitors those populations carefully to make sure they don't spread and become an invasive species into the rest of the state. So unless you are planning on going to SE Alaska, you probably aren't going to be catching any brookies any time soon. They are a very beautiful fish. I used to catch them growing up as a kid in Northern Michigan. They are actually a char and not a trout. Similar to Dolly Varden and Lake Trout. They have light spots on a dark background as opposed to dark spots on a light-colored background like true trout and salmon. Their light spots also have brilliant colors of red and blue inside of them. In my opinion they are one of the prettiest fish there are, but they generally don't get as big as other trout. I think a 20 inch brookie would be a hog.
    i knew that certain lakes in SE held brookies, but i didn't know if anyone has actually obtained this trophy certificate. reading through what fishing game has on them the largest one surveyed didn't even crack 15"

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    A tidbit the State of Maine : there was a 9 LB + Brook trout recorded Jan 2010 could not find how long it was .
    so don't give up , SID

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    we would ski into the boundary waters in mn and ice fish for them. Biggest we got was 24".
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    Biggest I ever caught was a lake superior coaster at 22".
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    so i actually got a hold of the current state record holder 3lbs 4oz measuring in at 19"..... so i highly doubt anyone one has ever obtained this catch and release certificate or ever will.

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    Quote Originally Posted by nate907 View Post
    so i actually got a hold of the current state record holder 3lbs 4oz measuring in at 19"..... so i highly doubt anyone one has ever obtained this catch and release certificate or ever will.
    a 19" dead fish would be a 22" live release in many anglers' books

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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    It always been a personal dream of mine to go after those monster brookie's. Labrador or Newfoundland anyone?


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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    It always been a personal dream of mine to go after those monster brookie's. Labrador or Newfoundland anyone?


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    I hear ya. And maybe catch an Atlantic salmon or 2 while we're at it.
    As a kid, fishing in PA our deer camp had access to some streams that (still) had native brookies. A HUGE fish was in the 10"-11" range and looked like most of the body was the head. Average size was about 5-7". Sure were fun to catch and (even for a 12 year old) beautiful to look at.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    I hear ya. And maybe catch an Atlantic salmon or 2 while we're at it.
    As a kid, fishing in PA our deer camp had access to some streams that (still) had native brookies. A HUGE fish was in the 10"-11" range and looked like most of the body was the head. Average size was about 5-7". Sure were fun to catch and (even for a 12 year old) beautiful to look at.
    I watched a video awhile back where guys were fly fishing for Atlantic salmon ON THE SURFACE!!! Yep they said if you got the fly just right in the fish's sight window they would actually come up and take them from the surface. I always wondered if silvers would do that?

    And yes, we used to hike up to about 10k feet in the Sierras and fish for brookies. That little lake was so full of them that they never got over 12" I think. And when you caught one of those it indeed looked like the it was all head. Some of those same types of alpine lakes also held golden trout which were almost impossible to catch....
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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Yup, both silvers and A. salmon can be caught on the surface, usually by skating flys down and across.


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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    Yup, both silvers and A. salmon can be caught on the surface, usually by skating flys down and across.


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    Have you done it up here?
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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    No, I never have, I'm not too much of a salmon fishermen. Almost all the fishing I do is for trout and steelhead.


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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Have you done it up here?
    Me neither, but I remember seeing Larry Dahlberg do it on one of his old shows.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Have you done it up here?
    I've done it, works well when the salmon are staging in slow water, lots of fun! I've heard of people catching chums and pinks on the surface as well (never seen it just heard it)

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Have you done it up here?
    Hot pink flies like polly wogs, basically a hot pink mouse pattern. Pinks and Chums will hit it, but silvers are pretty fun to watch slam em.
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    Yup, both silvers and A. salmon can be caught on the surface, usually by skating flys down and across.
    I've caught all 5 species of Pacific salmon plus steelhead on top over the years. When conditions are right and you put the right thing over them, they have no issues coming up. Kings in shallower river water are suckers for "dehydrated eggs" as we call them- basically take a Fat Freddy from 1" to 1 1/4" diameter in the right color, soak it in dry fly floatant, then wake it over the top of them. Reds in fast flat shallows are much the same with smaller versions, actually Glo Bugs about 3/8" in diameter. Chums, pinks and silvers are absolutely stupid for a wide array of dries, depending on location and situation. Caught my first dry fly steelhead in the North Umpqua River in 1970 and been doing it ever since. There's a long tradition of it now on the West Coast, and some guys won't fish anything else but dries for steelhead. Dunno about the great lakes, but if guys haven't figured the steelhead out on dries, they're really missing out.

    Most surprising and entertaining dry fishing I've ever done was 6 years ago when we sucked a school of black rockfish up to the surface, then switched to the fly rods with pencil poppers. Much fun as that was, my wife tossed hers back into a notch in the kelp bed and a king pushing 20# blew up the water taking it. Might not sound like much of a king, but she was using an 8WT rod! We landed that one and switched to the 10WTs and went to slowly cruising the edge of the kelp, tossing the poppers ahead of us into nooks and crannies as we went- just like fishing muskies or pike. Landed two more kings and lost a couple back in the kelp, all +/- that 20# range. Turned out that the black rockfish weren't the only ones excited to have a school of needlefish pushed up against the kelp! Only managed two on the poppers last year, and none in the years between, but we're always on the lookout. What a hoot, and what a strike!
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    I've caught all 5 species of Pacific salmon plus steelhead on top over the years. When conditions are right and you put the right thing over them, they have no issues coming up. Kings in shallower river water are suckers for "dehydrated eggs" as we call them- basically take a Fat Freddy from 1" to 1 1/4" diameter in the right color, soak it in dry fly floatant, then wake it over the top of them. Reds in fast flat shallows are much the same with smaller versions, actually Glo Bugs about 3/8" in diameter. Chums, pinks and silvers are absolutely stupid for a wide array of dries, depending on location and situation. Caught my first dry fly steelhead in the North Umpqua River in 1970 and been doing it ever since. There's a long tradition of it now on the West Coast, and some guys won't fish anything else but dries for steelhead. Dunno about the great lakes, but if guys haven't figured the steelhead out on dries, they're really missing out.

    Most surprising and entertaining dry fishing I've ever done was 6 years ago when we sucked a school of black rockfish up to the surface, then switched to the fly rods with pencil poppers. Much fun as that was, my wife tossed hers back into a notch in the kelp bed and a king pushing 20# blew up the water taking it. Might not sound like much of a king, but she was using an 8WT rod! We landed that one and switched to the 10WTs and went to slowly cruising the edge of the kelp, tossing the poppers ahead of us into nooks and crannies as we went- just like fishing muskies or pike. Landed two more kings and lost a couple back in the kelp, all +/- that 20# range. Turned out that the black rockfish weren't the only ones excited to have a school of needlefish pushed up against the kelp! Only managed two on the poppers last year, and none in the years between, but we're always on the lookout. What a hoot, and what a strike!
    Not much dry fishing for steelies on the Lakes, I did get one to come up on a dry glowbug that hadn't soaked up and sank yet, was awesome.
    Life's to short for an ugly boat

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