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Thread: Were is it LEGAL to look for & take Mammoth Tusks for a No-Native person

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    Lightbulb Were is it LEGAL to look for & take Mammoth Tusks for a No-Native person

    Were is it LEGAL to look for & take Mammoth Tusks for a No-Native person!.Or private ownership land. Found on beaches or land with in 1/4 mile of the ocean !and,and In rivers beds .&Easements ?
    I want to go looking for mammoth tusks but want to find a LEGAL way to do so.
    It seems very hard for Non Native people hunt for mammoth tusks legally with out private land ownership permission
    "Black bear scat is full of grass and smells like berries. Grizzly bear scat is full of bells and smells like pepper spray.

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    Quote Originally Posted by crocodiledundee View Post

    It seems very hard for Non Native people hunt for mammoth tusks legally with out private land ownership permission
    Not just difficult, but impossible.

    Not sure, but the same may apply to indigenous people off their native land claims also.

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    Quote Originally Posted by crocodiledundee View Post
    Were is it LEGAL to look for & take Mammoth Tusks for a No-Native person!.
    I've never heard anything to the contrary, (so I could be wrong) but as far as I know there isn't anywhere as a non-native up here. You might give "strangerinastrangeland" here on the forum a pm and I'm sure he can lay you out on it as he his family hunts for them. Or maybe he'll see this thread and respond....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    I think it's legal on Federal patented mining claims, definitely not on state mining claims. I know a miner over by McGrath that finds lots of tusks in his overburden.

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    Thanks for the tip I will PM "strangerinastrangeland" and see if he has any tips too.

    "Black bear scat is full of grass and smells like berries. Grizzly bear scat is full of bells and smells like pepper spray.

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    If on State land the State wants it or you to leave it there. Same on Federal and Native land. So it is difficult to find a place where you can legally keep one. But once you get one home who really knows where you got it!!!

    I know you didn't mention walrus tusks but they are neat to have. There are many ways to collect those legally.

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    I see your profile says Australia so you may want to be sure you can get it out of the USA legally and import it into Australia as well.
    I know some people who have some. I know one gentleman who has a couple that were gifted to him and I know one gentleman who just kept his mouth shut and was not caught after he found some somewhere many many years ago.
    I know if I knew of a legal area that had them where I knew they could be found I certainly wouldn't be posting on the internet of where this was just saying.....
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    I am pretty sure that ownership is legal for anybody, in Alaska. You can buy large tusks at Alaska Fur Exchange on the Old Seward. There are other places that sell it locally to anybody with cash.

    Other than private land, the white man is currently prohibited from collecting it. An indigenous person can. That's how I hunted it. I was with a native family that generously invited me along. We spent days and had some success. Teeth (cool ones) and bones are more common.

    I bartered some stuff for some of the ivory that we found. That native corporation encourages the practice as it brings much needed cash to local economies.

    Being from another country it will be hard to make a friend that could legally take you out. It is possible though. I encourage you to do it. It is fun and muddy! We putted along in a skiff along the beach until we smelled rotten barn yard stink. That means something is decaying and thawing out. We would probe metal rods into the bank until we hit ice or bone. We also did well along the local river.

    These guys have found lots of cool stuff, not just mammoth. Be advised that these locations are very remote and expensive to get to. Good luck!

    (I'll try to post a picture)I have a better one that is solid and brown. This one is blueish. Attachment 92813
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    Only on private land. Your private land or others private land with the land owners, preferably written, permission.

    Not on native land unless you are a member of that tribe.

    Not on any mining claim of any kind federal or state unless it's a patented claim.

    Anything over 50 years old on ANY public land is considered an antiquity and can not be disturbed.

    Yup even trash. Ring top cans that are over 50 years old are now antiquities and can not be disturbed.

    Only way a non-native can posses is if it is made into a native handicraft.

    Sorry bullbuster you were breaking the law unless you are native or the items you ended up with were made into a native handy craft.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hogfamily View Post
    Only on private land. Your private land or others private land with the land owners, preferably written, permission.

    Not on native land unless you are a member of that tribe.

    Not on any mining claim of any kind federal or state unless it's a patented claim.

    Anything over 50 years old on ANY public land is considered an antiquity and can not be disturbed.

    Yup even trash. Ring top cans that are over 50 years old are now antiquities and can not be disturbed.

    Only way a non-native can posses is if it is made into a native handicraft.

    Sorry bullbuster you were breaking the law unless you are native or the items you ended up with were made into a native handy craft.
    You beat me to it

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    Default Hmmm

    Quote Originally Posted by hogfamily View Post
    Sorry bullbuster you were breaking the law unless you are native or the items you ended up with were made into a native handy craft.
    I do not break any law knowingly. I have been kicking around Alaska for over 35 years.

    Why then can you buy an entire unmarked tusk at multiple places in Alaska?

    From Alaska Fur Exchange...

    Mammoth Ivory
    Jumbo solid pieces $95 to $120 per lb. Large Bark $95 & Up per lb. Medium Bark $75 to $95 per lb. Small Stuff $50 to $65 per lb. Teeth $150 each and up. Bone $40 per lb.
    Call for shipping price
    *Call for Mammoth Tusk Prices*

    I looked at these. As found, raw tusks. They also buy tusks and teeth. Look at the Nome newspaper. The last time I looked there are ads from Mammoth buyers looking for ivory at a per pound price. Not craft work, just ivory. The owner assured me it is legal to barter, buy and sell. I bartered for mine from a local native. I also happened to be along when he collected them.

    If you can cite the specific law, please do so. I can find nothing that outlaws possession of raw mammoth ivory if it is legally collected.

    Check these out. They are not carved and you can buy one. https://www.fossilrealm.com/collecti...tusks-for-sale
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    Supporting Member bullbuster's Avatar
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    There is also a Facebook page for collecting and selling mammoth ivory.

    Mammoth Tusk (Tooth, Hair, Bone) is the name of the page.
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    Natives can sell to other natives,

    New sealed ivory can be sold but you might need the permission of the feds.

    Old ivory must be made into a traditional native handy craft to be sold to a non-native.

    If the ivory is found on private property or a patented mining claim it can be sold to non-natives.

    Did you notice where that FB page is based?

    Oh yeah, try to send any legal ivory out of Alaska and see what attention you attract.

    Easy enough for you to figure out. Contact the feds.

    https://www.fws.gov/alaska/fisheries...ry_do_dont.pdf

    Oh, and notice it is ONLY walrus ivory found before 1972. (IE WALRUS IVORY ONLY). that non-natives can Possess.

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    Hog, I enjoy most of your posts, but we seem to be talking about different ivory. We are talking mammoth ivory. Not pop tops, not walrus ivory.

    Can you post a law regarding mammoth ivory. I have been unable to find much. Since elephant ivory is (rightfully) under attack, some states are specifically exempting mammoth ivory from any ban.

    Why is unmolested mammoth ivory for sale all over Alaska? You reference the page, but not the local store. That is not the only local store that sells it. Are they crooks too? I personally spoke to the owner. Go there. It is interesting to see all the old bones and mammoth ivory. For sale to anybody.

    There is a current ad buying mammoth ivory in the Nome Nugget. Look here. http://www.nomenugget.com/classifieds-2

    Like I said, it is every very available in Alaska. Cite a law that says it is illegal. It kinda chaps my butt to be called a criminal. If you can show me a law (about mammoth) I would accept that I am a crooked blister.
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    "Woolly mammoth ivory can legally be taken from private land with the owner's consent, then sold and carved."


    "The removal of mammoth ivory from state or federal land is banned in Alaska. But with mammoth fossils spread over hundreds of thousands of square miles of sparsely populated land, law enforcement cannot protect them all."

    Good luck finding AK native land that will allow you to collect mammoth ivory.

    http://www.deseretnews.com/article/635211699/Alaska-mammoth--legal-or-not--is-big.html


    "WHAT ABOUT FOSSIL IVORY?

    Fossil ivory (including walrus, mammoth and mastodon),

    archeological and paleontological materials are regulated by an

    array of Federal and State laws and these items may not be

    collected on any State or Federal public lands. Fossil ivory may
    be collected on private lands with permission of the landowner.

    Fossil ivory collected on private lands is not regulated under

    the Marine Mammal Protection Act and does not have to be

    registered"

    https://www.fws.gov/alaska/law/pdf/beachfound.pdf



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    You seem determined to make me out to be a shady character. As I have already explained, the collecting was legal.

    Your statement "Sorry bullbuster you were breaking the law unless you are native or the items you ended up with were made into a native handy craft." slanders my good name and is uninformed.

    From the last CITES convention. It is LEGAL to own, as I have been stating. As I also stated I was with a native on his corporations land. They allow him to collect and sell or barter. I am not a crook.

    "CONVENTION ON INTERNATIONAL TRADE IN ENDANGERED SPECIES OF WILD FAUNA AND FLORA ____________________

    IDENTIFICATION OF ELEPHANT AND MAMMOTH IVORY IN TRADE
    .....

    3. While trade in ivory from living elephant species is regulated by the provisions of the Convention, trade in ivory from extinct members of the order Proboscidea is not. This includes the woolly mammoth (Mammuthus primigenius), the range of which formerly included Siberia (Russia) and Alaska (U.S.A.). Although the possibility exists that extinct proboscidean species could be proposed for listing on the Appendices under the look-alike terms of Article II paragraph 2(b), no proposal to do so has been brought forward to date."

    I broke no law, state or federal.
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    This is what I know from personal experience fossil hunting with AK Native friends on AK Native Lands.

    "I broke no law, state or federal". "They allow him to collect and sell or barter. I am not a crook." YOU need WRITTEN permission to hunt / dig / remove / any type of fossil / mammoth / tusk / ivory from Alaska Native lands whether you have a native friend with you or not. It is at least a civil law if not federal. If you did not have WRITTEN permission you were in violation of the law. I also know they are less likely to give you permission if your intent is to sell the ivory.

    Don't get me wrong I am NOT, nor did I mean to infer, that you knowingly or willfully are / were breaking any laws.

    You will notice that I provided links to every thing I posted.

    Ok, I can also play the, (I've been in AK for X # of years too), over 40 to be exact in my case, 18 of which was in Barrow where I traveled extensively to all the North Slope villages. Several of which I have been fossil hunting with native friends with WRITTEN permission from the local native corp. (Which I also did not initially know that I needed as my native friend insisted that if I was with his family I did not need written permission.) We were both schooled by the native corp legal dept.

    Sorry my intent was not to cause you to think you were somehow a criminal. Was trying to advise you that it is quite complicated to hunt fossil ivory in AK except on private non-native or patented land.

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