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Thread: Best rod for mooching slivers

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    Default Best rod for mooching slivers

    What rod is best for mooching for silvers? I prefer GLoomis brand. Any suggestions regarding which model?

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    I GLoomis too, and I like mine long for both mooching and trolling. I've been really pleased with their 10'6" Model IMX 1264-2C STFR. Problem is, they're pretty specialized and take a little getting used to. Had a few breaks from novices and the ham-handed. I recently put four Shimano Convergence CVCL106M2B rods on the boat, and they're a treat. Including shipping, the four cost me less than one GLoomis.

    My wife and I keep our Loomis models hidden away when we have company, just to "protect" them a bit. As a result we've used the Shimanos a fair bit too with company. Lotta rod for not much money.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
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    Long and cheap!
    Cheap pole catches the same fish a expensive one catches!!!!


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    Quote Originally Posted by akmike30 View Post
    Long and cheap!
    Check out those Shimanos I linked. Winners on both accounts!
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

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    We've limited a few times with ugly sticks mooching.

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    What I'd look for in a rod for mooching silvers is something that can make a quick hook-set. When the silvers want to hammer your baits, the rod doesn't really matter, they're gonna hook themselves up just fine.

    But, more often the bite is subtle, just a little tap-tap, so a braid or something besides mono helps transmit that better...and a stiffer rod that can make a quick hook set when you give it the snap.

    But, I still mostly use ugly sticks because I just don't have the space (nor the money) for different trolling and mooching rods.
    "Fishing relaxes me. It's like yoga, except I still get to kill something." --Ron Swanson

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    Quote Originally Posted by MRFISH View Post
    But, more often the bite is subtle, just a little tap-tap....
    You're soooo right about that! Hard to believe it's a salmon, the hit is so soft. And kings are even softer! I wonder how many guys don't catch kings mooching, simply because they never feel the hits.

    That's why we like those long rods. Just a lot easier to pick up the tiny little ticks that are hits.

    One other thing-

    Try the long rods with your downriggers. The tips pulll waaaay down, and of course whip way up to help set the hook when a release pops. Our 9' and shorter "trolling" rods stay home now.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    You're soooo right about that! Hard to believe it's a salmon, the hit is so soft. And kings are even softer! I wonder how many guys don't catch kings mooching, simply because they never feel the hits.

    That's why we like those long rods. Just a lot easier to pick up the tiny little ticks that are hits.

    One other thing-

    Try the long rods with your downriggers. The tips pulll waaaay down, and of course whip way up to help set the hook when a release pops. Our 9' and shorter "trolling" rods stay home now.
    Agree with all this! Mooched in my California days from the late 70's till 2000 on a regular basis (2-3 x a week during the summer) and that King bite is very delicate if not nonexistent! Love getting picked up on the drop too. Might sound silly but I used and still own a Sears Roebuck and Co 9' Gamefisher 4000 Model I bought back in the mid 70's. Daiwa Millionaire 3R too was my choice of reel then too! A bit under gunned maybe but that's what made it FUN! Boy if that rod and reel could talk

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    Rods ??? they all work well, if they are long, the light bite can be seen , but if money is a problem , the ugley stick is hard to beat
    for my money , don't get me wrong, I build a fair amount of different rods but for the money spent the ugley stick
    is tuff to beat for the money I think . SID

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    Another vote for ugly sticks... However I do love a high end gloomis but with kids around I use the ugly Stix
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

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    One thing on my wish list for mooching (and I just saw it mentioned in the other thread about downrigger rods) is a line counter reel. That would really help target bait balls or other marks on the sounder at specific depths.
    "Fishing relaxes me. It's like yoga, except I still get to kill something." --Ron Swanson

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by MRFISH View Post
    One thing on my wish list for mooching (and I just saw it mentioned in the other thread about downrigger rods) is a line counter reel. That would really help target bait balls or other marks on the sounder at specific depths.
    The line counter thing has been a great help to me for the very reasons you mention and especially so when trolling with a diver in shallow water instead of using the manual rigger.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by MRFISH View Post
    One thing on my wish list for mooching (and I just saw it mentioned in the other thread about downrigger rods) is a line counter reel. That would really help target bait balls or other marks on the sounder at specific depths.
    We used to have both on our boat. It was such a PITA getting folks with non-counters onto fish, this spring I invested in enough more this year to have them on all rods. All I have to do now is call out a number from what I see on the sounder, and instantly folks can adjust depth. Makes a huge difference in catch rates.

    One benefit most guys don't think about. When using downriggers, the distance you hang your gear back from the wire can have a huge impact on the action of lure/bait/flasher, etc. The counters make it really easy to adjust lengths and hit the right spot every time you reset the gear.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

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    Ugly stick elite with the cheap ocean master real about 100 bucks total. I always have it hanging off the back of boat. With the smallest herring you can find with a 5oz banana weight, 12 inch leader to the hook.


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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    We used to have both on our boat. It was such a PITA getting folks with non-counters onto fish, this spring I invested in enough more this year to have them on all rods. All I have to do now is call out a number from what I see on the sounder, and instantly folks can adjust depth. Makes a huge difference in catch rates.

    One benefit most guys don't think about. When using downriggers, the distance you hang your gear back from the wire can have a huge impact on the action of lure/bait/flasher, etc. The counters make it really easy to adjust lengths and hit the right spot every time you reset the gear.
    I've tried various distances behind the ball from 10' all the way to about 40'. I've heard different things some saying if the flasher and bait are too close to the ball the spin is adversely affected and others saying it's better closer it sets the hook with more force. I've landed on splitting the difference with about 20' as my usual. Thoughts on this? Sorry to hijack the thread!


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    Quote Originally Posted by timinhomer View Post
    I've tried various distances behind the ball from 10' all the way to about 40'. I've heard different things some saying if the flasher and bait are too close to the ball the spin is adversely affected and others saying it's better closer it sets the hook with more force. I've landed on splitting the difference with about 20' as my usual. Thoughts on this? Sorry to hijack the thread!
    For us it varies with water depth and what's on the end of the line. When we're in the shallows or fishing with the gear up near the surface, I like the rigs well back from the ball and wire. I've experimented with that quite a bit, having one side close and the other far, and we definitely catch more fish with the gear well back when it's up in the brighter light and the fish are spookier. My norm in less than 20' of water is to set anything we're fishing back a full 50' behind the boat and wires. While fishing near the surface out in deeper water I hold to about 30' most of the time. The improvement is less clear cut there, but I still don't like to get the gear too close to the boat when it's up like that.

    Fishing deep it just doesn't matter, and especially when using Swarms or flashers on the ball I keep them back only 12-15' so they're still in sight of all that flashy stuff. That seems to help. There is such a thing as getting baits or lures too far behind flashy stuff on the downrigger ball.

    I'm much more prone to using flashers than dodgers on my lines. I really dislike plastic flashers though because they wander all over heck on turns and such with too much line out behind the wire. Metal flashers track truer, especially on those long setbacks up in the shallows. Saying all that is a prelude to this: I keep the rod tips sinched down really close to the water while trolling and I watch the rod tips like a hawk. I want to see the throb of the flashers, and I judge my gear by what I'm seeing there. I set the boat speed where I want it, then adjust the length of the lines until I'm seeing the throb I want. I'm always shooting for about a throb a second, so if it's too fast or too slow when I'm going the speed I want, I adjust the line length to do that. Closer makes for a faster throb, and further back slows it down at any given speed.

    BTW- Watching the throb of the rod tips is really critical in areas with current. I'll adjust boat speed up or down after turns so I get the throb I want. Might be going only 1.5mph into the current then as fast as 3.0 to 3.5 when I turn and go back with the current.

    Hope my ramble helps.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

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    BrownBear it is very helpful, thanks. Lots of good new information and some good reminders going into the fall as I've been mainly chasing bottom fish the last couple of months. I very rarely use divers and never dodgers so it's all very applicable. I haven't really put any time on with metal flashers so haven't experienced differences in cutting you talk about. I've got some 1970's metal flashers my dad handed down when I bought the boat that I remember using as a kid on Lake Aleknagik where I grew up. It'll be fun to give those a try to experiment with what you describe, though I'm sure for best results I outta get a couple of newer ones. I agree re: the throb as an indicator. My Garmin sounder also shows a true spiral (or not) which I also use to confirm the roll. Fun stuff makes me want to take the rest of the week off!

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    I have tried them all and this is simply the best rod at any cost for mooching silvers

    http://www.berkley-fishing.com/berkl...#sz=16&start=3

    99 dollars and if you mooch with 4oz leads or less it is light and durable. I have caught big kings on it too.

  19. #19

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    Andy, What model do you prefer?

  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKCAPT View Post
    I have tried them all and this is simply the best rod at any cost for mooching silvers

    http://www.berkley-fishing.com/berkl...#sz=16&start=3

    99 dollars and if you mooch with 4oz leads or less it is light and durable. I have caught big kings on it too.
    I was looking at the 10'6" model in Walmart...$80. Very nice rod! Wish they stocked a few shorter ones. 10'6" seems a little long for mooching..?

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