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Thread: Russian Fishing Question

  1. #1

    Default Russian Fishing Question

    okay, so I know the Russian is SLOW but I was down there all day
    I fished all day,...guy next to me fished all day - he caught two and hooked several more.
    I hooked not one so what's he doing different?

    Same weight....same place

    I have a spinning rod with mono and a russian river fly.
    He has a fly rod, green line and a russian river fly - probably a little bit longer pole

    Later in the parking lot a guy said the guys running fly rods seem to do better.

    So...why is that? And why did he do so much better than me?

    And for those of you who are about to make a "longer pole" joke you can save it.

  2. #2
    Member kwackkillncrew's Avatar
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    Leader length? Weight of fly? Maybe he pulls it as it floats down the river to make the leader perpendicular with the flow of the current.


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  3. #3

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    yup. Generally technique and rigging make the difference. When there are tons of fish everyone is hooking up, but when it's tough it's usually the little things that make a difference. Luckily, most of the guys fishing are pretty open to helping a guy out if you ask right. Or just sit on the bank and watch. Not quite as effective, but it helps.
    Oh, and move a bit if you can. I know what I'm doing (for the most part) but I've watched someone a few steps down hammer them while it feels like I'm fishing empty water; a few feet can make a difference....rocks, gravel, depth, things can change quickly on the bottom of a river and a few feet can make a big difference. Again, more so when the fishings not hot.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Knowing the exact spot in the river to fish is also key. Knowing a small channel very well, every rock, etc. and knowing that the fish are travelling in that small tiny channel helps a lot. Same cast placement and sweep...changing up and "gridding" the water until you get some bumps (fish) and then working that bump area consistently.

  5. #5
    Member akfisherman's Avatar
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    I've fished the Russian for years...I've fished next to guys that never hooked up while I limited out....on the Russian it's 95% technique and 5% equipment. I fish with a 9' salmon rod


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  6. #6

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    I'll throw my weight in with the guys saying a few feet difference on the river, as well as the precise drift technique. I love the Russian, but until that water is below 13" it can be really tough for most people (myself included). I've found that this year with the deeper water the fish have been holding really tight behind boulders in some of my favorite holes. This makes it really, really, REALLY hard to properly get the leader to depth in order to get a legal hook up before the current takes it away. In those holes, being 2 feet up or downstream of the "right" spot makes it impossible to hookup, for me at least. However, on some of the more accessible stretches leader length and timing on the sweep are pretty demanding that you be precise. Hopefully the second run will kick into high gear soon and we won't have to be so precise to enjoy good hookups! At least the water level is dropping now.

  7. #7
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dixiedog View Post
    okay, so I know the Russian is SLOW but I was down there all day
    I fished all day,...guy next to me fished all day - he caught two and hooked several more.
    I hooked not one so what's he doing different?

    Same weight....same place

    I have a spinning rod with mono and a russian river fly.
    He has a fly rod, green line and a russian river fly - probably a little bit longer pole

    Later in the parking lot a guy said the guys running fly rods seem to do better.

    So...why is that? And why did he do so much better than me?

    And for those of you who are about to make a "longer pole" joke you can save it.
    Too many possibilities to nail one. You need to ask the angler! Floating or sink tip line is a biggie. Leader length. With a sink tip line and short leader, it us easier to floss fish because the line travels through the water flatter, with less angle. With a floating line, typically the line angle will be similar to using a long baitcast or spinning rod on short, flipping drifts.

    Fly rods can be easier to flip with; meaning more casts and time in the water. All other things being equal, more time in water means more bites. Also the fly line is easier on the hands than mono or braid.

    Rod sensitivity is big. If you dont feel the fish you cant set on it. The difference between a fish and a rock can be very subtle.

    Last, it could be where your feet are. Too close to the fish and maybe you are pushing them out away from you. Or there is a bottom feature or current quirk that is putting fish in range of his flip? Fishing steelhead once I had an incredible hour of fishing because I had the spot. There was a little drop in the bottom where fish would pause. If I could get my fly to drop in there I would get a fish every time. Skip over it, no fish.

  8. #8

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    Thanks guys for sharing your experiences, good stuffs.

  9. #9
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    I think feel on the Fly rod will tell you a lot , an you don't cast a fly rod you toss it an don't waist your time with the reel like a spinning rod,
    you can feel the bottom of the stream with the fly rod, this helps a lot , if you toss a spinning rod all day your hand / arm are tired ,
    where a fly rod will not tier you out like a spinning , people that do the Russian river a lot, for the most part will be using a fly rod I think
    SID don't need fly line, lots of people use heavy MONO line in its place [ cheaper ]

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