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Thread: How much white gas

  1. #1
    Member
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    Default How much white gas

    My brother and I are going to be out for 13 days and I am not sure how much fuel we will need for our cook stove and lantern. ANybody have any ideas?

  2. #2
    Member Frankie 2 Times's Avatar
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    Default

    Bob,
    I guess that would depend on whether you are "cooking" or just point water for oatmeal and mountain house meals. What I would do is determine how long it takes for your stove to boil a meal size quantity water that is ~36 degF. This will tell you how long you need to run the stove to boil water. Then multiply that my the number of times you'll need to do that on the trip. Add in a "fudge factor" since you'll be doing this at home in TX where its warm instead of in the field. I would multiple the boiling time by (1.5). Then fill the tank on the stove and see how long it will burn. Do a little math and you can figure out how many meals worth of boiled water you can get out of a single tank of fuel. A little more math and you'll figure out how much fuel you'll need for the entire trip.

    Approximate how long you'll think you'll run the lantern eat night. Do the same routine for the lantern you did for the stove and you'll know how many tanks of fuel you'll need for the lantern.

    Then plan on taking a bit extra. You can always run the latern less for more run time on the stove. I personally would rather sit in the dark with a hot meal, than watch each other eat cold mountain house.

    F2T

  3. #3
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default My 2 cents.

    Do as stated above and then take extra. The stove and fuel are VERY important. Last year on my sheep hunt my stove saved me and my hunting partner after we killed a sheep and had to stay on the mountain for the night. My MSR stove saved us from hypothermia. After we got back to the lake were we got dropped off. Other hunting parties gathered there and were waiting to be flown out. After they called the pilot and he said he was on the way, they had a eat all our stuff and burn all our excess party. Well, the weather closed in and we stayed another 3 days. Lucky for them I brought extra fuel. I would recommend that you bring extra, you should be light going in anyway, (NO SHEEP YET) fuel and food are consumable, if you don't use it all save some for your flight out and burn the rest before you fly. I keep a little food and fuel for the trip back just in case something happens to the the plane and the way home.

    Steve

  4. #4
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    Default For what it's worth

    Here is a note from the MSR website

    # MSR recommends 4 oz. (114ml) of liquid fuel per person per day for cooking or 8 oz. (237ml) of liquid fuel per person per day for melting snow and cooking. An extremely cold trip, like skiing in Antarctica, may require as much as 15oz. (444 ml) of liquid fuel per day.

    # In general one 8 oz. canister of MSR IsoPro fuel will be sufficient to boil water for two people over four days in summer. Wind, low temperatures and longer cooking times will increase fuel consumption.

  5. #5
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    Default

    No need to get technical with formulas and crap. Two guys, two weeks, two gallons and you'll have some left over for getting stranded awhile.

  6. #6
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default late p/u

    "I keep a little food and fuel for the trip back just in case something happens to the the plane and the way home."

    Prob a very good idea. I usually do my first sheep hunt in ANWR on the north side of the Brooks. Started in the early '90's. Only once in all those years have I been picked up on time - usually 1 to 3 days late, but on several occasions it has been as long as 5 days - always due to weather. I have always spiked out from base camp (landing strip such as it usually is) and am usually gone 10 to 12 days from base camp. I always leave a small stash of extra fuel and food at the landing site - usually a gravel river bar which can change from year to year.

  7. #7
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    Default

    Thanks for the info. I think I'll go out in the garage and do some cooking.

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