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Thread: Antler transportation across Canada borders Question

  1. #1

    Default Antler transportation across Canada borders Question

    Father-in-law and I are going hunting in August with hopes of getting a caribou and/or moose. He will be driving back any antlers back we get back to the lower 48 (if we are lucky enough to get one or a couple). We both have licenses, but in the hopes of both us getting one, if he is traveling with mine and his, does anyone know (or have experience) on how to show that they are legal and he didn't poach an extra pair of antlers? We are a little extra worried about the Canadian borders.

    If I get one, I would like to have a local Fairbanks taxidermist prepare the hide for shipping down to my local taxidermist (which I have already discussed with both of them), but to save a little extra on shipping, I was hoping I could just have the antlers driven back down to me. Any help would be greatly appreciated.

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shadder View Post
    Father-in-law and I are going hunting in August with hopes of getting a caribou and/or moose. He will be driving back any antlers back we get back to the lower 48 (if we are lucky enough to get one or a couple). We both have licenses, but in the hopes of both us getting one, if he is traveling with mine and his, does anyone know (or have experience) on how to show that they are legal and he didn't poach an extra pair of antlers? We are a little extra worried about the Canadian borders.

    If I get one, I would like to have a local Fairbanks taxidermist prepare the hide for shipping down to my local taxidermist (which I have already discussed with both of them), but to save a little extra on shipping, I was hoping I could just have the antlers driven back down to me. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
    I just moved to Haines from Anchorage, which meant I had to haul all my stuff through Canada and back through the U.S.. They ask about animal products and I answered about my two antlers and skulls. From the Canadian standpoint, they said that didn't matter to them, but mad issue of it because they weren't sure how the authorities going back in to Alaska would treat it. The guys on the Alaska side specifically asked, "Do you have anything with you that you picked up in Canada?" to which I answered no and there was no further discussion about it.

    Since you guys sound like out of state residents, you get a locking tag for your moose antlers. If you're sending your antlers with him, I would have a photocopy of your documentation to that locking tag, including your punched harvest ticket, so that he can show that you harvested the other set of antlers. Then, fill out and sign the transfer of possession form in the back of the regulations booklet. They include that form specifically for situations like this.

    I talked with the Canadian guards about the antlers for a minute. Their angle was that, they had no issue bringing in antlers that were mine, but they were worried about getting them back in to the U.S. I guess that is a problem, people pick up or acquire hides and trophies without documentation and U.S. border agents will seize them because it's a way to export trophies to sell without a license. He asked if had documentation for them and said that's what he thinks U.S. customs wants to see when you're bringing them in. If you document the stuff as I said before, I don't know what else you could do to prove they're yours. The state of Alaska appear to be fine with transferring possession for export.

    My two cents, don't worry about the Canadian side as much as the U.S. re-entry. If you're not sure, call the border post that you know you'll be coming back in through.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    I just moved to Haines from Anchorage, which meant I had to haul all my stuff through Canada and back through the U.S.. They ask about animal products and I answered about my two antlers and skulls. From the Canadian standpoint, they said that didn't matter to them, but mad issue of it because they weren't sure how the authorities going back in to Alaska would treat it. The guys on the Alaska side specifically asked, "Do you have anything with you that you picked up in Canada?" to which I answered no and there was no further discussion about it.

    Since you guys sound like out of state residents, you get a locking tag for your moose antlers. If you're sending your antlers with him, I would have a photocopy of your documentation to that locking tag, including your punched harvest ticket, so that he can show that you harvested the other set of antlers. Then, fill out and sign the transfer of possession form in the back of the regulations booklet. They include that form specifically for situations like this.

    I talked with the Canadian guards about the antlers for a minute. Their angle was that, they had no issue bringing in antlers that were mine, but they were worried about getting them back in to the U.S. I guess that is a problem, people pick up or acquire hides and trophies without documentation and U.S. border agents will seize them because it's a way to export trophies to sell without a license. He asked if had documentation for them and said that's what he thinks U.S. customs wants to see when you're bringing them in. If you document the stuff as I said before, I don't know what else you could do to prove they're yours. The state of Alaska appear to be fine with transferring possession for export.

    My two cents, don't worry about the Canadian side as much as the U.S. re-entry. If you're not sure, call the border post that you know you'll be coming back in through.

    Thank you, that is what I needed to know!!

  4. #4

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    To be extra safe, you should pick up an import export permit from us fish and wildlife enforcement. They can help you fill it out and stamp it. that will solve all your issues.
    It is always a chance without it, you could have issues. Some boarder agents have the paper work at the boarded and will help you, other don't.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by isnarewolves View Post
    To be extra safe, you should pick up an import export permit from us fish and wildlife enforcement. They can help you fill it out and stamp it. that will solve all your issues.
    It is always a chance without it, you could have issues. Some boarder agents have the paper work at the boarded and will help you, other don't.
    USFWS Form 3-177 Declaration For Import or Export Of Fish Or Wildlife.

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    Quote Originally Posted by isnarewolves View Post
    USFWS Form 3-177 Declaration For Import or Export Of Fish Or Wildlife.
    Awesome. That's what I think the Canadians were thinking I might need to have.
    Born in Alaska: The boundary lines have fallen for me in pleasant places; surely I have a delightful inheritance. Psalm 16:6

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    We hauled antlers last fall for a friend across the border. We had the mentioned paperwork filled out & signed by the hunter, along with copies of his permits. We had to fill out paperwork for our game at customs.

  8. #8

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    Stop at the us border station on your way out of Alaska and ask for the USFWS form which they will help you fill out. Don't forget and drive all the way to the Canadian border patrol like we did. They will send you back and it is a bit of a drive.


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  9. #9

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    There is no requirement for state permits or transfer of possession. Because the regulation does not require you to keep it for inspection after the game has left the field and has been at a place of processing or preserved for human consumption. Alaskan game laws/regulation only have jurisdiction within the boarders of Alaska, if game was harvested legally.

  10. #10
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    the only thing that might be an issue is unprocessed ungulate skulls. with all the CWD and such going around I'm sure anyone doesn't want foreign game brain matter making its way into their area. At a minimum I would make sure the skulls are clean and dry, to the best of your ability. I'm pretty sure if you're travelling from the south up here they won't let you in with any raw skulls or spinal tissue from cattle or large wild game due to the risk of disease spread. Be careful, don't want to lose your hard earned trophys

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