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Thread: Boat Trailer Fit Up Questions

  1. #1
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    Default Boat Trailer Fit Up Questions

    Ok, boat trailer dilemma: Long story short I bought a new boat package in 2006 (yes I ranted about the dealer for the undersized trailer in a post a couple of years ago) and I was overloading the trailer. So I purchased a new trailer and specíed out the best features like EOH with disc brakes, torsion axles, C-Channel frame, HDbunks, spare with hub, etc. I forgotabout moving the axles!

    I fit the boat to the trailer like youíre supposed to which was perfect aligned transom tie downs and then check tongue weight which was high 1000 lbs out of 8300 lbs. Then move axles right, well no itís C channel galvanized bolt thru the bottom flange. So I moved the boat back and Iím almost out of space for the winch post and Iím about at 900 lbs tongue weight. Iím trying to target 700 lbs.

    Iím afraid to drill the c channel and move axles. I could drill into the top cross bar (6Ē cchannel) to move the winch post back about 4 inches and bolt it. Not crazy about compromising the galvanized coating even with cold zinc as a possibility or Iím I overly concerned about cold zinc protection? Ideas? Thanks
    IMG_2626.jpg
    Ryan
    Kingfisher 2525 Honda 225 & 20

  2. #2
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Position it accordingly and weld it in place. Hit it with paint afterward.
    Bk
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  3. #3
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    You could go to the weld store tomorrow and get some galvanized sticks. They also sell temp sticks. You heat the metal to a certain temp with torch, then basically plaster the galvanized stick on the newly welded area. If prepped properly it's an accepted method of repairing subsea galvanized structures. Any more questions pm me. I've done it about a 1000 times successfully with inspectors/engineer approval. Or if you need weld/torch help.

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the ideas. The Galv stick is new to me but sounds like a good fix...
    Ryan
    Kingfisher 2525 Honda 225 & 20

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by shayno View Post
    You could go to the weld store tomorrow and get some galvanized sticks. They also sell temp sticks. You heat the metal to a certain temp with torch, then basically plaster the galvanized stick on the newly welded area. If prepped properly it's an accepted method of repairing subsea galvanized structures. Any more questions pm me. I've done it about a 1000 times successfully with inspectors/engineer approval. Or if you need weld/torch help.
    This guy seems to know what he's talking about but I'd PM him. I've just done a few stick welding projects but thought torch cutting and welding zinc produced toxic fumes.

  6. #6
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    I'd move the axles to achieve your balance tongue weight wishes. There does not look like enough adjustment for the winch post. What about bolting in a new longer tongue (can't tell from the pic)? Sucks down here in SE AK a boat trailer like that is over $7k!

    Sobie2

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    Quote Originally Posted by BQuad View Post
    This guy seems to know what he's talking about but I'd PM him. I've just done a few stick welding projects but thought torch cutting and welding zinc produced toxic fumes.

    Yes, horrible toxic fumes. But, with a fan and fresh air the welding/cutting is easily done safely... galvanized poisoning is horrible, ask me how I know!!!
    But seriously, don't be scared of a little galvanized work. No big deal.

  8. #8
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    At 900 lbs you are in spec. Anything between 10% and 15% is acceptable. When I set trailers up I try to hit about 12%. On that note you should be at 996 lbs. Any change in load then has little effect on tongue weight.

    DO make sure that the trailer is level. This will ensure you have equal weight on the axles. Looking at what you have left for adjustment should be plenty. A difference of 50 or 60 pounds is not going to matter.

    What would concern me is whether or not the rear of the boat is supported by the rollers or bunks. Support at the transom especially if running an outboard, tilted up it's even more important to have the support at transom. This keeps the boat from porpoising on the trailer going down the road and lessens the chance of seeing fatigue cracks develop in the transom area.

    The hot galv procedure does a nice job, but as stated outside and a fan blowing the smoke away is very important. Have done it a few times.

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