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Thread: Solo Moose Butchering

  1. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by K Dill View Post
    I'm not a good enough shot with my longbow to hit them in the ear, and I can't get good penetration on a frontal skull hit.


    I totally agree on avoiding gutting if at all possible. I have never gutted any of the several bulls I've personally taken or helped butcher. Ultimately every dead moose is a unique situation and all a guy can do is work hard and problem-solve until it's complete.
    I have shot several right in the brain with my bow to finish them off. These were bulls that were down and not getting up. Got close and drilled them right through the forehead. With my compound set at 80 pounds.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  2. #42
    Member akiceman25's Avatar
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    How do you harvest the heart, liver, and belly fat without gutting???

    I'm old school. I gut em.
    I am serious... and don't call me Shirley.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KM2K7sV-K74

  3. #43
    Member KantishnaCabin's Avatar
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    The heart is easy to get to when the ribs come off, still no need to gut. Liver if you wanted it is visible in the gut-sack and can be harvested last I guess. I've never taken any of the fat before so I'm not sure about that, usually, I am trimming off all the fat I can find. Personally, I do not harvest any of the organs unless I have specific requests from friends to bring them something. I have from time to time harvested the heart and tongue. Once I took the liver for sausage, but the wife didn't like it so I haven't since.

  4. #44

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    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeRoss View Post
    I have shot several right in the brain with my bow to finish them off. These were bulls that were down and not getting up. Got close and drilled them right through the forehead. With my compound set at 80 pounds.
    I could drill one about anywhere once they are down....but I'm pretty certain a 64# longbow launching a wood shaft still isn't going to reliably bust a moose's skull. I'll have to stick to the good old broadside boiler room shot.

    As far as the comments regarding gutting...tenderloins...organs, etc, I always 100% get the tenderloins out without gutting a moose. We don't eat any type organs or organ meat ever so getting to them is moot, as is any thought of going for internal fat. No tongue either. I remember watching a Chippewayan man work up a caribou in the NWT. After everything was basically done he found the large intestine; specifically the colon and cut off the last 4' of it. He then washed it thoroughly and turned it inside-out to repeat. I asked him how it would be utilized and he indicated it was for a big stew but was also delicious pan fried in seal fat or other grease. Black beans optional, lol.

  5. #45
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KantishnaCabin View Post
    I don't gut either. I learned how to do a gutless butcher 15+ years ago and haven't looked back. The tenderloins are pretty easy to get to once the hind quarters and backstrap have been removed. Its usually the last thing I do when I butcher, the good news, they are always on the top of the meat sack and are easy to find when we get back to camp for the celebratory moose snack.
    Agreed. Personally I usually don't take the guts all the way out to get to the tenderloins either.....just move them out of the way. They're usually fairly easy to get to as well as anything else a person wants, especially if you've taken one whole rib cage side off, which I like to do as well if they're in good shape and it's not far to pack out. I pretty much always take the heart and a little bit of liver (if the bull wasn't in the rut too heavily) to dance in the pan with an onion for at least a couple meals while fresh.... it really doesn't freeze that well. I've never tried it for sausage. After all these years I finally tried tongue from a spike/fork my buddy killed last season. Although it "wasn't bad" I failed to see how some just rave about it and doubt I'd make it mandatory to bring out. Maybe I just didn't have a good recipe?
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  6. #46
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K Dill View Post
    I remember watching a Chippewayan man work up a caribou in the NWT. After everything was basically done he found the large intestine; specifically the colon and cut off the last 4' of it. He then washed it thoroughly and turned it inside-out to repeat. I asked him how it would be utilized and he indicated it was for a big stew but was also delicious pan fried in seal fat or other grease. Black beans optional, lol.
    You'd think the colon wouldn't have any taste to it. But I guess they get enough from the seal oil.....lol. Some of the things those natives eat "amazes" me....lol. But I guess it's all what a person grows up eating. Many don't like duck, which I find hard to believe, but I was raised on them and think they're delicious...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  7. #47

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    I have done a few moose by my self and do it differently by my self then with a buddy or by my ATV. Much of it depends on where the moose falls and how big it is.

    If the moose is on his back I unzip it and remove the innards. Then I cut the neck/head off as they move easier with out the neck and head. If bullwinkle still insists on laying on his side I take the 2 exposed quarters off, hide and all and then skin them on a tarp I lay under them. With the guts, head/neck and 2 quarters removed the moose is then easier to move. I then remove the other 2 quarters, hide and all and skin them and having a 4x8 foot tarp along helps to keep the meat clean. Putting them in game bags is a hoot.

    I have a light weight single part aluminum shiv and I usually can dead man that to something and it has proven to be very handy.

    There is more then one way to skin a moose by your self. I hope I never have to do it again. At my age I prefer having my ATV and my wife or a buddy to help. It is amazing how much help another person is.

  8. #48

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    The puzzle is solved. I killed a mature bull on my solo hunt last week. Basically skinned one side complete. Used a 2 pole system for leverage to remove both quarters. Then came the backstrap, brisket, neck meat, side meat rib meat and inner tenderloins. Then off with the head. Flipping went easier than I imagined. I used a single pole (and noose) to get the hind leg/hip elevated as far as possible. I 'set' the pole in a propped and balanced position. Then I grabbed the front leg and did a nonstop heave-ho until I had the carcass all the way up....and over. Repeat the process of skinning and butchering. Tough job for one man but I ended up with ten bags of clean meat and a big skull. Things I liked or didn't:

    Latex dipped Kevlar gloves were outstanding for the work. My hands came through looking fine.

    Cutco 5718 with DD edge is still my best knife for taking a bull apart. Superior tool.

    Razor knife with hook blade worked fairly well at making the initial skinning cuts. I'm not sure it was any better for me than a good straight blade would be.

    Meat hook got minimal use. I'm not down on it, but I just didn't find it useful on this job.

    Have a couple more meat bags than you need. It beats the alternative.

    I donated some meat and have 400 pounds frozen in boxes in Fairbanks waiting to ship home.

  9. #49
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    congrats! Pics, though... without them its all just another story.

  10. #50
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    congrats! Pics, though... without them its all just another story.
    I'm guessing he had his hands too full for a photo session.
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  11. #51

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    Disbelievers take heed....

    Seriously want to send thanks for those who gave useful input. Solo moose butchering, boning and packing is not for the timid.




  12. #52
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    Congratulations K Dill! That is quite the workout. I did my first solo moose butcher this year with 500 yard pack out, it almost did me in. Thank the Lord for giving me a fork horn and not a mature animal.

  13. #53

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Agreed. Personally I usually don't take the guts all the way out to get to the tenderloins either.....just move them out of the way. They're usually fairly easy to get to as well as anything else a person wants, especially if you've taken one whole rib cage side off, which I like to do as well if they're in good shape and it's not far to pack out. I pretty much always take the heart and a little bit of liver (if the bull wasn't in the rut too heavily) to dance in the pan with an onion for at least a couple meals while fresh.... it really doesn't freeze that well. I've never tried it for sausage. After all these years I finally tried tongue from a spike/fork my buddy killed last season. Although it "wasn't bad" I failed to see how some just rave about it and doubt I'd make it mandatory to bring out. Maybe I just didn't have a good recipe?
    I think you were in need of a recipe. Braise that tongue with a bunch of onion, garlic, chiles, spices, whatever, for 3-4 hours. Pull it out, peel it, put it back, and mix it all up, making sure the liquid is reduced enough to keep it saucy, but not runny. This is the beginning of the best lengua tacos you've ever eaten.

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