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Thread: Cheap traps really hurt

  1. #1
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    Mar 2011
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    Kenai Peninsula
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    Default Cheap traps really hurt

    Hey everyone,
    I spent last winter really struggling with my 220s. I bought a few conibears from Sportsman's, Cabelas, and Bass Pro. At around 10 bucks each, saving money is important for a new trapper like me. What I found is that they are all made in Taiwan. I'd assume by the same company. The triggers on these are so crappy that it is too easy to set them off. So easy in fact that twice I caught my hand in them as I was releasing pressure after setting them. This was my first serious season so I'm still getting the hang of it. Luckily it was only the pressure of one spring each time but man did that hurt. It usually takes me two hands to compress the spring but I was able to use some scared adrenaline to squeeze it and release myself one handed. What I observed is that the "latch" on the trigger didn't fit well into the notch of the prongs that extended down. This causes the latch to not sit well into the saddle and the trap to go off what I'd consider too easy. Has anyone else had this problem? I'm looking for a way to modify them or a local place to buy some quality conibears for a decent price. Thank you.

  2. #2

    Default

    First off, boil your traps in order to remove any oil left over from the manufacturing process. That will likely take care of your problem. Bodygrip traps SHOULD NOT be lubed in any way including wax. If they are still a problem you can use a file in the appropriate places to reshape either the dog or trigger for a better fit. You can also use a bit of sandpaper to rough-up a short section of the jaw in which the dog comes in contact in order to add a bit of friction. Finally, NEVER set a trap that could catch a dog.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    Bristol Bay
    Posts
    328

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    the latch that you refer to is called the dog. The notches on the dogs of most conibears need to be filed to avoid this from happening setting any trap straight out of the box is pretty much unheard of most of them need some minor work even with a lot of the higher end traps. You mention buying locally and cheaper traps with traps you really get what you pay for and the higher end traps will need replacing much less often than those cheap ones. Coni springs on Dukes in particular get soft fairly quickly compared to some of the the others
    As for " NEVER setting a trap that could catch a dog I'm not sure where that comment came from or if it was a general warning if so it is good advice within reason depending on where you are trapping.
    meats meat don't knock it till you try it

  4. #4
    Member
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    Aug 2006
    Location
    Eagle River,AK
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    1,494

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    All part of the job. After hunting season, no bugs and crisp air, I love going thru the pile of traps from the year before with bent and missing jaws, pans and triggers and cleaning all the old wax paper out of springs. Good feeling to have your tools all hanging and ready for the snow to fall. Way better then looking around in the snow and working on them in -30!

  5. #5
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    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    Wasilla, AK
    Posts
    712

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    The guys really keyed in on some good points in adjustment of your traps... I look forward to it every Fall in my trap shed. Fire up the stove, turn the radio on and clean and prep lol. With that said if your looking for better quality traps never buy Dukes. Take a look at: trapperman.com in the Trap Shed. Great prices on used traps. No worries having to degrease them and most are ready to be boiled in a little Log Wood dye.

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