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Thread: Hudson Bay hull durability

  1. #1

    Default Hudson Bay hull durability

    Has anyone found a way to make fiberglass canoe hulls more abrasion resistant for needs such as dragging over shallow gravel? I am interested primarily in canoes such as the Scott Hudson Bay model. I have started a separate thread for spray on bed liners so lets not go there on this thread please but rather use the other thread for that.

    I have tried to picture placing UHMW strips on the bottom but the thickness of the plastic would have to be prohibitive to be greater than the "keels". I know of no way to place a solid sheet over the entire bottom due to the keels and UHMW's lack of sharp bending or molding characteristics.

    Has anyone come up with an idea that works for them for fiberglass canoe hull abrasion resistance?

    I understand that the kevlar glass does not adhere well to the polyester resin fiberglass and tends to want to peel? off when dragged over obstacles such as gravel.

    Any insights would be great and thanks guys in advance.

  2. #2
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    ROCKS to Canoe's is like sand paper is to wood , a well made Alum. canoe will hold up to rocks the best I have found ,
    [ Grumman ] UHMW comes up, Air boater use it on the bottom with good results I have been told [ adds lots of weight ]
    good luck, SID

  3. #3

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    Thanks Sid.

    Doesn't look like very many people have solved this problem yet I guess.

  4. #4

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    Well shucks I just tried posting and my post got it.

    I've had my Hudson Bay since '97. I've done a variety of repairs on it over the years using epoxy resins, I haven't had a repair fail yet. I read the following article years ago about using graphite in resin for rock resistance. http://tomangelakis.tripod.com/graphite_bottom.htm

    I would use bi-axial fiberglass before kevlar. It's less expensive, wets out and lays down nicer and after it sets up some additional resin with graphite could be laid over it. If peel ply was used for laying down the glass it would likely go a long way to reducing the extra drag on the hull created by the new glass. That's often a problem with kevlar in my experience.

  5. #5

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    Thanks for that link. Very informative article

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    Are you thinking of buying one of these freighters? You sound like you are buying the wrong canoe. Dragging heavy keeled canoes over gravel is not a good way to go, there are much better shaped hulls for shallow rivers. The heavy keeled freighter canoes were designed for big water = deep rivers and big lakes. The only pulling over gravel you want to do with that canoe is beaching it on shore for the night.

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    I 100% what Pipercub has stated about the big canoes [ freighter ] great on big water but very limited on small streams,
    shallow SID

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by pipercub View Post
    Are you thinking of buying one of these freighters? You sound like you are buying the wrong canoe. Dragging heavy keeled canoes over gravel is not a good way to go, there are much better shaped hulls for shallow rivers. The heavy keeled freighter canoes were designed for big water = deep rivers and big lakes. The only pulling over gravel you want to do with that canoe is beaching it on shore for the night.
    You may be right but I really like not only the fuel economy but the load carrying ability of the freighter canoes. I'm not in a big hurry but I do want to get to where I want to go. It seems the major flaw with non aluminum freighters is their shallow water durability. If I can overcome that problem then I should have a boat that fits my needs.

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    don't for get about the weight of your freighter , it might drag but I am an old man now , on one of my trips I had to drag my 19 FT SQ Grumman
    what happened was I ripped the metal covering the BOW, the canoe was heavy if I remember correctly SId
    PS you don't really drag , you pick up the front an move it forward some then do it again till you get done with the "" drag ""
    most of the liners don't slip it holds

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    Quote Originally Posted by mountain joe View Post
    You may be right but I really like not only the fuel economy but the load carrying ability of the freighter canoes. I'm not in a big hurry but I do want to get to where I want to go. It seems the major flaw with non aluminum freighters is their shallow water durability. If I can overcome that problem then I should have a boat that fits my needs.
    The shape of the hull is the point of the discussion, not the freighter canoe itself. There is nothing wrong with freighter canoes, I own two of them. You don't want a keeled freighter in shallow rivers. The keel is constantly contacting the bottom and when you are turning around in the current, the keel will hang-up on the bottom. Being sideways in the current with your keel hung up is not a fun place to be...

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    In my experience, grinding the keels and bottoms off canoes, and taking on water, there is one very good way of combating this. It'll cost about 2 grand in materials. Like I had advised forum member rifleman, you'll want to modify the wine glass section by filling the voids with a dense closed-cell marine grade expanding foam and cutting it to take the shape of the canoe. You'll want to scruff up the polyester based gel coat and use only plain-weave cloth and epoxy resin. Bi-axial won't be the right material for this, because the stitching will stick out, giving it a rough finish, and peel ply only works well on extreme curvatures (keels) with vacuum pressure.

    Same with below the waterline on bottom of hull, 3-4 layers of 16-18 oz cloth wetted out with epoxy. It'll bond very well to the polyester based stuff when roughed up with 80 grit. Please wear a mask, this stuff will kill yah. Bathe in cold water, or you'll be itching for days, as hot water will drive it into your pores. Cloth wetted out in epoxy is amazingly abrasion resistant, well worth the 40-50 extra lbs of weight.

    I did something somewhat similar to this to an old 18 Valhalla freighter canoe, it was really labor intensive, and took about a week. I promised myself, that was the last large-scale canoe repair/modification job I'll ever do. Even with a good mask, I had a weird reaction to the old polyester stuff.

    This old gold miner fella ended up taking this viking canoe over a hundred miles up the goodpaster and the salcha rivers with a 23 hp copperhead during last year's record low water.

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