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Thread: spray on bed liner for canoes

  1. #1

    Default spray on bed liner for canoes

    I have read a couple referrrences to the spray on bed liners for use on the bottom of canoes. I am curious about peoples experiences of using such. I understand that the liner makes the bottom exterior of the canoe much more durable to "abuse". My first question is how much more durable?

    Will using this liner allow me to drag a heavily loaded fiberglass canoe over shallow gravel repeatedly to get my hard earned moose and camp out of riffle and pool type streams?

    What about fiberglass repair if I hit an unseen underwater boulder? How tough is it to get this stuff off in order to patch a fiberglass canoe hull while in the field?

    Thanks guys for any help you can give.

  2. #2
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    Paint-on worked terribly for me. I had to spend several hours w/ solvents removing it. Dropped the speed 3 or 4 mph and when I painted it on a piece of wood and dragged in along my gravel driveway with moderate weight, it tore right off. The stuff I used was just a little bit rubbery, but not terribly so; don't recall the name. I looked into getting some really hard stuff (used in grain chutes) sprayed on by a guy in the Anchorage or Sterling area, but the cost was prohibitive and he was a little uncertain of how it would do anyway. IMO a reasonable solution is to cut off the keels in the back 3-4 feet and apply UHMW; not an easy task, and no idea how that would affect the handling of the canoe. In all probability, we are stuck to just deal w/ it and repair an necessary. An alternative is a huge, aluminum freighter. I talked w/ a guy in Canada 3-4 yrs ago and he said it was doable, but would be about $10K. I think he said that was with an eighth inch bottom. I aim to call a few of the custom boat builders in Alaska and see what they think. SOMEBODY could make money at it, as I bet a Grumman on steroids would sell. Just a hunch. Good luck solving this. john

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    BTW: My old Scott had a minor repair where the transom hits the hull, and the repairman did not quite lay in enough matt. Thus, a bump knocked the unsupported resin out and left a 1.5" x 3/16" hole. It was snowing, so we turned the canoe around, jacked it up w/ logs and threw a tarp over the butt end. We cleaned the area inside and out, and I cut strips out of a cotton (I know; COTTON? It's comfy!) tee shirt and epoxied them in, both inside and out. We put a camp stove under the area for an hour or so to help the epoxy cure, and the next day we were off. That lasted 100 miles on that trip, and another bunch on another trip until we could really fix it. Fiberglass is repairable. j

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    You can strain bed liner to get the grit out. I used herculiner and it worked fine on mine, once the grit is out.

    one day closer to alaska.
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    What brand of bed liner? Did it drop your mph any? Thanks. j

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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Herculiner. Once the grit is out, it is like painting it. Smooth and no drop in mph. Monstaliner, herculiner, rustoluem liner all can be filtered to get the grit out.

    one day closer to alaska.
    "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

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    How durable is that gritless herculiner?

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    Once you filter out the rubber grit, you have a thick polyurethane goo. You can thin Herculiner 10% with xylene. You might want to thin before you strain the rubber grit out. Using Herculiner as an example, it is a polyurethane 70% and xylene 30% mix. Removing the rubber grit reduces the volume/weight, so watch how you are figuring your 10% thinning process. Also test your boat surface with xylene before using! I like Kevlar/epoxy myself.

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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountain joe View Post
    How durable is that gritless herculiner?
    About the same as full strength. I would put on several coats.

    one day closer to alaska.
    "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

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  10. #10

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    I am unfamiliar with the spray on bed liners, I have only read about them. By "how durable" I mean will several coats of that product allow a fiberglass canoe to be dragged over shallow gravel bars repeatedly without wearing through the finish or is that expecting too much from it.

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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    I had it on my sylvan and it held up well. My jeep has it inside and out, and that was 6 years ago. I would think 3 or 4 layers would be fine.

    one day closer to alaska.
    "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Take a look at the various companies websites. Several have free samples they will send you. Play with the free samples first. 4 coats of any of these products will set you back $100 or more.....

    one day closer to alaska.
    "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

    Edwin Hubble

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    I'm with Piper...I put epoxy/Kevlar on my Cargo front and back and the only thing that seems to scratch it is the concrete at launch ramp. Round river rocks and sand seems to have little effect on it and it is smooth even though there are some drag marks in it and I suspect it has little effect on speed...canoes only go so fast anyway.

    On the other hand, I put Hercliner on the floor of my skiff and it's great to keep from sliding around and it holds things in place just like in a truck bed...great stuff. I'm not sure how it will adhere to gel coat on fiberglass but if you scuff it up I suppose it will work.
    Somewhere along the way I have lost the ability to act politically correct. If you should find it, please feel free to keep it.

  14. #14

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    Go to alsliner.com
    Call them for the slick boat hull recipe and spray techniques and they will walk you through it.
    You can mod the above to fit your needs for slick or heavy textured.
    Great product and C.S.

  15. #15

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    Thanks everybody for the input. Some good info here.

  16. #16

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    Here's some information from Wetlander a coating manufacturer:

    Donnie Fox on February 4, 2013 at 8:16 pm said:
    Steve,
    I have a fiberglass canoe with gel coating. After sanding the gelcoat, will the wetlander adhere to the gel and withstand the flexing of the hull? And if so, can your tinted product be used to change the color of the boat (“painting it a new color”).


    Reply ↓


    Wetlander
    on February 5, 2013 at 10:59 am said:
    Donnie,


    Yes, the Wetlander will easily adhere to the gelcoat, and is a lot more flexible than gelcoat, too! And, yes you can paint the entire canoe with Wetlander to effectively change it’s color. It will probably take two coats to kill the color you are trying to cover. A quart of Wetlander should be more than enough to get two full coats on a “standard” canoe. The color chart for Wetlander is in the Ordering section of this site. Feel free to contact me if you want suggestions about your specific canoe. Thanks for the question.


    -Scott

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