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Thread: Tying boat to wood post/pillings?

  1. #1

    Default Tying boat to wood post/pillings?

    hi all
    ...what are some of the ways to tie off your boat overnite
    to wood pilling?...say, if anchoring is not going to work?
    ....do you wrap a floating line around the post so it will slide with the tide?....also, do you tie off from the bow or the midships?
    ....our boat is metal at 30 feet approx for an example!..thx larry

    ps...this will be a one man operation for the most part!!

    29' Wooldridge Pilot House, Twin 200 Hp Etecs! "...Pez Gordo..."
    18' Wooldridge Sport with 200 hp sport jet. "...Little Pez..."

  2. #2
    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Don't tie off to the pilling. Tie off to the floating dock.

  3. #3
    Member SteveAK's Avatar
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    Put bow line tending forward and stern line tending aft at minimum. You could also do a lines amidship tending fore and aft. Agree with Old John, don't tie off to piling if there is a floating dock. Lines will hang up and boat could capsize with the tide.

    If one man job, take line running from forward cleat into cockpit and tie off cleat on dock so line is tending aft. Once motion stopped and boat against dock, jump out w/ an aft line and secure. Place other lines as needed.

  4. #4

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    Quote Originally Posted by Old John View Post
    Don't tie off to the pilling. Tie off to the floating dock.
    ....thats the problem..the place we normaly go the docks are gone just the pilings remain!...its the dock in my sig pic!
    thx

    29' Wooldridge Pilot House, Twin 200 Hp Etecs! "...Pez Gordo..."
    18' Wooldridge Sport with 200 hp sport jet. "...Little Pez..."

  5. #5

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    Give yourself plenty of slack. Then set your alarm clock to get up and check it every hour. Better yet, set up a rotating watch, 2 hours on for each person onboard. If that's not possible or you forgot your alarm clock, anchor off.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  6. #6
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bcriverhunter View Post
    hi all
    ...what are some of the ways to tie off your boat overnite
    to wood pilling?...say, if anchoring is not going to work?!!

    Why is anchoring not going to work?
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  7. #7

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    With a lot of tide, and you're not tendering, there is really only one good way to tie to pilings. See drawing, wherein is revealed it's all about geometry! The NO's are a serious no-no! You want the boat to be tied to Two (or more) piles with a loop that is loosey-goosey. So, the line has to be so slack that the boat is not hard when you tie up. I speak from experience. The line must be more generous (outboard of) than the width between the piles, otherwise when the boat falls the tie points if inboard of the piles will obviously tighten because of friction. Of course, this can lead to some banging about if the weather is tough but the what's better, come in the morn and see a swamped skiff, or, a pic-op of it hanging sidewise off the piles? And, it doesn't take much tide to make mischief, just ask me!

    tieup.jpg

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by copperlake View Post
    With a lot of tide, and you're not tendering, there is really only one good way to tie to pilings. See drawing, wherein is revealed it's all about geometry! The NO's are a serious no-no! You want the boat to be tied to Two (or more) piles with a loop that is loosey-goosey. So, the line has to be so slack that the boat is not hard when you tie up. I speak from experience. The line must be more generous (outboard of) than the width between the piles, otherwise when the boat falls the tie points if inboard of the piles will obviously tighten because of friction. Of course, this can lead to some banging about if the weather is tough but the what's better, come in the morn and see a swamped skiff, or, a pic-op of it hanging sidewise off the piles? And, it doesn't take much tide to make mischief, just ask me!

    tieup.jpg
    thx copper for that!!..i love your diagram!!!!
    ...now, what if i only have one post to tie up to?..this little cove has a few posts.but not all are usable!

    thx larry
    ...what

    29' Wooldridge Pilot House, Twin 200 Hp Etecs! "...Pez Gordo..."
    18' Wooldridge Sport with 200 hp sport jet. "...Little Pez..."

  9. #9

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    Quote Originally Posted by copperlake View Post
    ...a loop that is loosey-goosey....
    Even with that be very, very picky with your piles. No roughness or snags allowed. Also never tie above (or below if docking at low tide) any cross bracing.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

  10. #10
    Member Gerberman's Avatar
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    How about putting some PVC pipe over your line to let it roll up the piling, you could cut a number of pieces, slip it over the line, it might not snag as much, you might try it during the day when you can watch what happens.

  11. #11

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    Larry, OK, one pile does not work as I described unless it's flat calm or the tide does not run hard. Otherwise, if you know the tides, tie from the bow with a large bight (say 4' diameter) in your bowline knot around the pile with enough scope to counter any tide increase/decrease. Having said that, if the area you are working has big tides the scope may allow the boat to wrap around another pile and thus not work. Do not use a sinking or sheathed line like double braid, instead 5/8" or 3/4" (actually, the larger the diameter the better) regular FLOATING poly. Have a nice sturdy serrated knife handy if things go south! As others mentioned, the smoother the pile the better, obviously.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by copperlake View Post
    Larry, OK, one pile does not work as I described unless it's flat calm or the tide does not run hard. Otherwise, if you know the tides, tie from the bow with a large bight (say 4' diameter) in your bowline knot around the pile with enough scope to counter any tide increase/decrease. Having said that, if the area you are working has big tides the scope may allow the boat to wrap around another pile and thus not work. Do not use a sinking or sheathed line like double braid, instead 5/8" or 3/4" (actually, the larger the diameter the better) regular FLOATING poly. Have a nice sturdy serrated knife handy if things go south! As others mentioned, the smoother the pile the better, obviously.
    thx copper for all of that!..i think the floating line is the secret!...will grab some tomorrow!...i will know the tides so worse case a person will stand watch!
    ....rest of the time we will.anchor at different locations but i like this one small cove as it is 5.minutes from good fishing!!..thx again for all the replies! larry

    29' Wooldridge Pilot House, Twin 200 Hp Etecs! "...Pez Gordo..."
    18' Wooldridge Sport with 200 hp sport jet. "...Little Pez..."

  13. #13
    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    just load up the line with gillnet floats to go around the piling, they will float the rope and act as rollers as long as the piling is fairly snag free. tie it off loose or let out a lot of line so if it hangs on the pile it will give you some time before the poop hits the fan and either it sinks the bow or hangs the bow in the air. Make sure you tie off both ends to the boat on to your bow cleats so if you need to get off it fast all you have to do is untie one cleated side and drop the rope in the water to give it instant slack, the bowline will be a pita to untie quickly and could grab hands/fingers in the rope while trying to untie it under strain.

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  14. #14

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    thx to all..potbuilder and copper!
    ...did it for 2 of 3 days!..ok, i didnt sleep for 2 days but what ur are saying helped!
    ....i bought 5/8ths poly ! awsome!...now, when im back and can chat i will tell what i hate about piling!.lol
    ....40 foot rope/bow tie worked awesome!..will post some pics and have more ? later!...thx copper for the floater tip!😎

    29' Wooldridge Pilot House, Twin 200 Hp Etecs! "...Pez Gordo..."
    18' Wooldridge Sport with 200 hp sport jet. "...Little Pez..."

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