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Thread: Foundation for a small storage shed?

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    Question Foundation for a small storage shed?

    Hi guys,

    I have a small cabin along the upper Kenai that I visit every summer. One of my projects (when I'm not fishing) is to build a storage shed to free up room in the cabin. I've been eyeing a prefab (but needs assembly) shed that I saw in the parking lot of HD in Kenai last summer. It's 10'x10' and made of resin/plastic. I'm only planning on storing non-essential stuff in the shed, so I don't care about keeping it insulated.

    Question though, for a small 10' x 10' shed, do you think I can just build it on a leveled out spot near the cabin? Or should I build some sort of foundation for it?

    Thanks,
    Steve

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    How close is it to the river? It's not unusual for the Kenai to flow over its banks, so putting it on raised posts of some sort would be helpful in that case. It also allows for you to slide things under the shed that you don't necessarily want (or have room for) inside.

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Coupla loads of D-1, compacted, over Typar, done....
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    Coupla loads of D-1, compacted, over Typar, done....
    Stupid question, what is D-1?

    I'm familiar with Typar as we used a similar housewrap to build a cabin.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    How close is it to the river? It's not unusual for the Kenai to flow over its banks, so putting it on raised posts of some sort would be helpful in that case. It also allows for you to slide things under the shed that you don't necessarily want (or have room for) inside.

    The shed is going to be around 75 yards away from the Kenai. I do remember it overflowing around 2011 I think. That's a good point about the over flow and under shed storage. Thanks!

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    D-1 is unsorted crushed rock, 3/4 inch minus. I think...I'm just a diy user but that seems to be the general description.

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nyclad View Post
    Stupid question, what is D-1?

    I'm familiar with Typar as we used a similar housewrap to build a cabin.
    D-1 is roadbase gravel, "typar" is a generic term for road fabric.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Quote Originally Posted by nyclad View Post
    Stupid question, what is D-1?

    I'm familiar with Typar as we used a similar housewrap to build a cabin.
    Typar is not a house wrap. You may be thinking of Tyvek...???
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Typar is not a house wrap. You may be thinking of Tyvek...???
    Typar does make a housewrap, 4mer...its pretty heavy duty...I prefer Tyvek though...its Alaskan siding!
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    Typar does make a housewrap, 4mer...its pretty heavy duty...
    Oh really?......that's news to me. Never seen it before......
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Member ChugiakTinkerer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cdubbin View Post
    Typar does make a housewrap, 4mer...its pretty heavy duty...I prefer Tyvek though...its Alaskan siding!
    Slight detour re house wrap ...

    There's a discussion on tar felt for siding on the CountryPlans forum, and one of the comments had this link: http://bct.eco.umass.edu/publications/by-title/housewraps-felt-paper-and-weather-penetration-barriers/

    That's an old study and Typar has introduced a new product since. In a follow-up they note:
    Typar introduced a new non-perforated housewrap in 2003. We tested this new version in our lab during the spring semester of 2003 using the same tests described above. We found that the new Typar performed as well as Tyvek and Rwrap in the hydro-head testing. In fact it demonstrated superior resistance to surfactants when compared with the performance of Tyvek. - See more at: http://bct.eco.umass.edu/publication....Gw1Tzb4q.dpuf

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Oh really?......that's news to me. Never seen it before......
    I sold the heck out of it for years before my supplier stopped stocking it. Lasts about 10 times as long as Tyvek if left exposed, which never happens in rural Alaska
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKDoug View Post
    I sold the heck out of it for years before my supplier stopped stocking it. Lasts about 10 times as long as Tyvek if left exposed, which never happens in rural Alaska
    Or even urban Alaska......lol
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Not sure how the winds are on the Kenai, but I'd be concerned a resin shed on a gravel pad might get blown over. I'd consider pier blocks on compacted gravel with a pressure treated base for a shed. It'll get your shed a few feet off the ground to protect from mild flooding, and provide some weight to keep the structure from getting blown over by the wind.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Typar is not a house wrap. You may be thinking of Tyvek...???
    Yeah, I got confused, we used Tyvek. Lol...

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Not sure how the winds are on the Kenai, but I'd be concerned a resin shed on a gravel pad might get blown over. I'd consider pier blocks on compacted gravel with a pressure treated base for a shed. It'll get your shed a few feet off the ground to protect from mild flooding, and provide some weight to keep the structure from getting blown over by the wind.
    You think maybe something like this?
    42909e43_73768_picturex_1.jpeg

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Not sure how the winds are on the Kenai, but I'd be concerned a resin shed on a gravel pad might get blown over. I'd consider pier blocks on compacted gravel with a pressure treated base for a shed. It'll get your shed a few feet off the ground to protect from mild flooding, and provide some weight to keep the structure from getting blown over by the wind.
    Quote for truth!

    I'd be looking at some ground anchors like the ShelterLogic structures use, or duckbill anchors, or something. Even a traditionally framed structure with T1-11 siding is at risk of a strong wind blowing it over. Anchor every corner and you'll be good to go.

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