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Thread: Trailer Question

  1. #1
    Member tlingitwarrior's Avatar
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    Default Trailer Question

    For those of you with boats that have an outboard bracket, does your bracket ride on your trailer rollers or bunks? My 24xl has the floatation bracket, twin 150's. My rollers stop just a few inches past the transom, meaning all brackt and motors "hang" with no support. I have towed the boat in this manner for a couple years, and the guy I bought boat from never used the trailer but twice a year and only for a few miles each way. Potential issue here?

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  2. #2
    Member Rob B's Avatar
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    Default

    Looks good to me. Pretty much every trailer ive seen is just like yours and mine.


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  3. #3
    Member akfisherman's Avatar
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    Default Trailer Question

    It seems that it would be a lot of stress on the welds. I would think that the twins weigh a couple pounds and bouncing along our fine alaskan roads has got to eventually cause a problem.


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  4. #4

    Default

    IMO, it really depends on several things. I've seen brackets produce strain (in one case, actually breaking the transom) on boats just in water use. The 'depends' are all around how well the fastening is to the transom. If yours is held on by six 3/8" bolts then, well, you might have a prob. Usually, these things are smushed on with a LOT of 5200 or somesuch, which, is an adhesive as long as it still maintains its integrity and has great strength. As well, the fastenings should be all across the lateral length and frequently spaced. Many is better than few, diameter not so much of an issue as long as they have good bearing. Many times, because of the interior hull construction (decks, old engine box) it's difficult to get enough purchase for fastenings. You have nearly 1,000lbs hanging with two F150's, so yes, bouncy bouncy is producing a strain.

    EDIT: Being a guy that has made a few of these, I wouldn't be more concerned about the welds (assuming it was constructed properly) than I'd be with the attachment. Of course, you set them on their trailering arms which really helps with preventing 'twang' that could affect welds.

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