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Thread: Sizing 270 brass out to 280

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    Member AK Wonderer's Avatar
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    Default Sizing 270 brass out to 280

    Can 270 brass easily be sized out to 280? Any issues in doing so?

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    The head space on the shoulder on the 270 Win is shorter. Probably have to fireform it to move shoulder forward, dont know how to do it safely.

    Shot a 270 Win in my 280 Rem by mistake, ended up with brass in my nose and face have put fingernail polish on all my 280 Rems now.

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    IF, you can size Up to 06, you can size back Down to 280. That leaves a bit of shoulder to control headspace, that will go away after fireforming.

    I've made 280 from 06 and it works just fine. The necks end up shorter than 280. The 280 shoulder, neck, and therefore, case length, is longer to prevent 280 from chamber in a 270 rifle.

    I've not made 280 from 270.

    Perhaps, you could size those 270 to 280, making only the neck larger, then make a load, seating the bullet long and force chamber it, so the case is held back against the bolt face, effectively Headspacing on the bullet.

    And Fire Form.

    I have NOT done this, myself. I've only heard of this, so dunno bout the details.

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    Member Longbow6360's Avatar
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    The 270 Base-to-case/shoulder junction is 1.948 and base-to-shoulder/neck junction is 2.155. The 280s base-to-case/shoulder junction is 1.999 and base-to-shoulder/neck junction is 2.199. Since the base/shoulder measurements of the .270 are shorter than the .280, you'll need to either create a false shoulder or seat your bullet well into the lands, a false shoulder being the safest IMO. With either method, just make sure your base is seated firmly against your boltface before fireforming or slightly dented primers or case separation will be a problem. If you're not sure what I mean about a false shoulder, I took an old 7x57 case I had and necked it out to .308 then necked it down to 6.5mm just shy of the shoulder so it would headspace on that. I left the false shoulder halfway up the neck for illustration and clarity reasons. Normally it would be slightly bulged above the shoulder. Neck you brass down close to your shoulder until you just feel a slight resistance when you close your bolt.
    I have done this with various calibers and case many, many times. It works. Chuck J.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Longbow6360 View Post
    ...false shoulder....
    That will be key unless you have a particular taste for Cream of Wheatand don't want to buy the necessary dies.

    An age old solution is to put a small charge of pistol powder in the case (270 Win in this instance), fill the case to the base of the neck with Cream of Wheat and top with a wad of toilet paper to keep it there. Load and fire. There's just enough resistance from the COW to form the case, even as the COW makes an ungodly mess on the ground and everything else it lands on.

    I don't recall a specific powder and charge recommended for the 270, so I'll leave it at that and let you dig it out from the web.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
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  6. #6

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    All said and done it would be a mistake to use 270 brass to make 280 why? One 270 brass not fire formed will have excess head space and cause issues and possible injury, not worth it in my experience.

    But its your face and eyes! To easy to make a mistake.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kk alaska View Post
    To easy to make a mistake.
    That's true of all reloading. Caution and experience required. I've been forming cases for right at 50 years, so this isn't my first rodeo, and it's not theory learned at the keyboard.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    That will be key unless you have a particular taste for Cream of Wheatand don't want to buy the necessary dies.

    An age old solution is to put a small charge of pistol powder in the case (270 Win in this instance), fill the case to the base of the neck with Cream of Wheat and top with a wad of toilet paper to keep it there. Load and fire. There's just enough resistance from the COW to form the case, even as the COW makes an ungodly mess on the ground and everything else it lands on.

    I don't recall a specific powder and charge recommended for the 270, so I'll leave it at that and let you dig it out from the web.
    I've used COW quite often. As a general rule, use 10% of the case capacity with Bullseye and fill the rest with COW. It works quite well unless your ejector forces your case too far forward in the chamber to get a good solid strike at your primer. The cheapest and most successful way would be to create a false shoulder and use COW to blow out the shoulder.
    As far as buying special dies, at least in the case of going from .280 to a .270, you could take the .270 dies you already have and run your .280 cases up into them, adjusting the die lower and lower until your bolt closes fully on the case but still with a slight resistance.
    Other case forming are more involved and aren't so easy, like my 22 Cheetah....uuuuhg! I finally roasted the throat in it so I parted off the chamber last night and rechambered it to a 220 Swift.

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    Quote Originally Posted by kk alaska View Post
    All said and done it would be a mistake to use 270 brass to make 280 why? One 270 brass not fire formed will have excess head space and cause issues and possible injury, not worth it in my experience.

    But its your face and eyes! To easy to make a mistake.
    True to some extent. I have .257 Weatherby loads with .257Wby, .264WM and 7mmWM headstamps. It would be bad ju-ju if I chambered the .264 or the 7mm brass formed for a .257 in the chambers they're headstamped for. YIKES! If someone doesn't keep good records and properly labeled loads, it could be a disaster.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Longbow6360 View Post
    If someone doesn't keep good records and properly labeled loads, it could be a disaster.
    Yup. Smart, safe reloading.

    About 15 years back I bought a case of new 7x57 brass. A couple hundred rounds in fact stayed as 7x57. But the rest have turned into 6mm Rem, 257 Roberts, 257 Improved, 8x57 and 9x57. You ought to see what happened to the case of 30-30 brass I also bought!

    I DO NOT rely on head stamps to tell me what's up front. I have found kind of a neat stunt I'm incorporating into all my case reforms. Clean the case head and stamping with a bristle brush and a little solvent, then smear fabric paint (color corresponding to caliber) across the head so it gets down into the stamping but not on the main surface. Stays in there pretty good, and serves as a quick visual reference and reminder. So far I'm using red for 6mm, yellow for 257 Roberts and blue for 7x57. Haven't loaded the others since I started with this, so I have some big color decisions coming up.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Yup. Smart, safe reloading.

    About 15 years back I bought a case of new 7x57 brass. A couple hundred rounds in fact stayed as 7x57. But the rest have turned into 6mm Rem, 257 Roberts, 257 Improved, 8x57 and 9x57. You ought to see what happened to the case of 30-30 brass I also bought!

    I DO NOT rely on head stamps to tell me what's up front. I have found kind of a neat stunt I'm incorporating into all my case reforms. Clean the case head and stamping with a bristle brush and a little solvent, then smear fabric paint (color corresponding to caliber) across the head so it gets down into the stamping but not on the main surface. Stays in there pretty good, and serves as a quick visual reference and reminder. So far I'm using red for 6mm, yellow for 257 Roberts and blue for 7x57. Haven't loaded the others since I started with this, so I have some big color decisions coming up.
    Excellent idea. I'm stealing that!

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