View Poll Results: Best stain to use on a log cabin. Take your pick and tell me why. Thanks.

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  • Timber flex

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  • Lifeline by permachink

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Thread: Best stain to use on a log cabin poll

  1. #1

    Default Best stain to use on a log cabin poll

    Which would you prefer and why? I'm a better builder than a painter so I'm looking for some input. Thanks.

    FYI I misspelled the name Sikkens. I actually think the spellchecker didn't recognize the spelling and changed it automatically but oh well. Hopefully you can figure out what I meant.

  2. #2
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    I used all Permachink products on my place and am VERY happy. Used the chink, sealer and stain. I am very impressed with the stain. Been 10 years and it is showing absolutly no fadding and I am on top of a hill, no shade and TONS of sun hitting the place. Ended up using the stain on the outhouse and gen shed to match and they came out great. SBS was the distributor 10 years ago..

  3. #3
    Member hogfamily's Avatar
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    Permachink products.

    Our cabin has Permachink sealer and it has lasted over 15 years. Still working well with an occasional wash down.

  4. #4
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    This stuff is some of the best I've found in a long time....http://www.abrp.com/restore-preserve/
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  5. #5
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    About 20 years ago I used an oil based Behr product that the pro's just called "Behr 5-way" (because the label said it offered "5 way protection..."). Don't recall the proper name, and not sure they still make exactly the same formula, but it was GOOD stuff; uber-high in methyl-ethel-bad-stuff and VOC's! It blocked UV, prevented mold, mildew, rot.... held up really, really well on raw spruce, and ambered just very slightly and gradually over time. And it didn't build up a heavy, shiny, varnish/verathane-like coating, which I dislike. I wish I could get ahold of a couple hundred gallons of that stuff again!
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  6. #6
    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    Thanks to California you can't buy it anymore. I think it was called Bearhide.
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
    '08 24' HCM Granite HD "River Dog"

  7. #7
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    I think you guys are talking about Behr Rawhide, not Bearhide. And (this time) it's not California's fault, it's Behr's. Lots of people had a problem with the product not curing properly and promoting mold growth, but because it never fully dried it also was very difficult to remove without blasting with corn cobs or glass beads. Huge class action lawsuit.

    If you liked Rawhide, it was linseed oil based, so look for another linseed oil based product. I hear that Behr has improved the formula and has a new name for it, but I don't know that.

    In my opinion, if your primary purpose is to have a durable, easy to apply and easy to maintain finish for logs, the best option by far is Chevron Shingle Oil. Besides the fact that it really does a good job of protecting the wood, what I like about shingle oil is that it is an oil and not a "finish". So, you never need to worry about it peeling or failing to cure properly and it doesn't require as much log prep. With most of your stains/finishes you need to remove sunburned wood fibers from your log, which requires bead blasting or power washing, but the wood also has to be bone dry to apply the stain/finish. Often, when a stain flakes or peels, it's not the stain that is peeling, but it is the very thin layer of sunburned cellulose that the stain is adhered to that is peeling.

    With oil, that sunburned wood fiber will, over time, slough off of your logs, but the oil penetrated right through and is protecting the virgin fibers underneath.

    Other advantages of shingle oil include the fact that it's actually best to apply to slightly damp wood, so you can wash your logs with a garden hose (or power washer) and apply stain the next day. It's less than $100 for 5 gallons, which is enough for a small cabin. 10 gallons might be enough for a house. Re-apply every 5 years, but let's be serious, you won't re-apply it until the logs start looking bad in 20 years. That's fine. No sanding or sandblasting necessary. Just clean your logs with water and spray on another 10 gallons. Spray it on with a backpack sprayer. Pour it into the sprayer through a paint filter, just to make sure there's nothing to clog your tip, but I've honestly never had a problem with clogging.

    Inlet Petroleum in Anchorage should be able to hook you up, but they might need to special order it, so give them a call.

    About the only downside is that it's definitely not low-VOC. It does kind of stink after applying, so don't use it indoors. Also, it is petroleum based, so maybe you should be careful not to dump a bunch of it in a salmon stream or next to your well.

    Perhaps the wine and caviar set doesn't think it's as pretty as some of the stains that have pigments and a satin finish, but I prefer the look of oiled wood to shiny wood anyways. I know that people have had luck adding pigment, but I've been told not to. I've never had a reason to try.

  8. #8
    Member LOCALAK907's Avatar
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    Default Best stain to use on a log cabin poll

    Penofin best product I had ever seen when I worked at a cedar yard. Easy reapplication and penetrates into the wood very well. Many tones to choose from uv protectant. Brazilian rosewood oil based. Great coverage to boot!
    http://www.penofin.com/


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  9. #9
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HikerDan View Post
    I think you guys are talking about Behr Rawhide, not Bearhide....
    So, I went and found an old bucket in the shed; the stuff I was referring to was Behr NWF waterproofing stain and sealer. It was a low viscosity, oil based penetrating finish, and I guarantee it would NOT allow mold growth. The VOC's would make your cabin uninhabitable for about 2 days, but after that it was awesome stuff. Sounds alot like the Chevron oil you're describing. I used to apply mine with a pump sprayer too. I've had the tip get clogged so I definitely concur with careful filtering into the sprayer.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

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