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Thread: Boat refloor help Fairbanks

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    Member TeXXaN's Avatar
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    Default Boat refloor help Fairbanks

    Looking for help, I need to redo the floor in my boat, its got plywood wrapped in carpet now that is a pain. I want to go to 3/4 marine grade and some vinyl flooring, measured everything its going to be 370 in supplies. I do not want to screw any thing up if any one has done this before and is willing to help that would be awesome. Located on Eielson, its 11'x5' flooring area. Thanks in advance
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    What type of boat do you have aluminum or fiberglass?

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    Member TeXXaN's Avatar
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    1986 Jetcraft, Aluminum.
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    Marine grade plywood has copper in it and copper will corrode aluminum. You will need to put something between the aluminum and plywood or you will have problems. Do a search to find out what you need to use.

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    I think it depends on the plywood. Some of the treated stuff is corrosive to aluminum, but I think that the AB marine ply (at least the $100/sheet stuff that sbs sells) is just more dense and put together with better glues than standard plywood, not actually treated. I hope so anyway - I just glued about $75 dollars of it to the thin aluminum stern of my old hewescraft jetboat since the old standard ply finally rotted out .

    I think if you go with true treated you need to go with the CCA treated (yellow/orangeish and more expensive) rather than ACQ (greenish) so as to not rot the aluminum.

    Honestly for what it costs, I'd just use regular plywood and plan on replacing it every 10 years. Maybe paint it good first to help seal it? I am no boat builder...

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    Treated plywood or ACQ does have copper and other chemicals that can be corrosive, marine plywood has "exterior glue" and is a higher quality, typically douglas fir and is not corrosive. AC plywood also has exterior glue and a better grade than CDX, which is common exterior sheathing plywood. You can get AC, CDX and marine grade from SBS here in FBKS, or you can get "Real" marine plywood from Superior hardwoods on the Old Steese, either Aquatek or Hydrotek, they use other woods that are more rot resistant than doug fir, okume, sapele, merranti comes to mind.

    Are you confused yet? I used CDX for the floor in my boat and then had it coated with bedliner by Vertex, its a good floor, but a bit heavy and I would not use CDX again if I had to buy new plywood, the boat came with CDX and it was only a few years old so I used it. AC would certainly hold up for my many years and be cost effective.

    You can cover with vinyl, do you need 3/4"..? Its awful heavy and weight is the enemy, how close together are your channels that the floor attaches to?

    The boat shop on chena pump sells some ready to go boat flooring that is pretty light and very durable and seems it comes in widths that will yield less waste than a standard 4 X 8 sheet, at least from what I remember.

    I used some camper topper bed tape of the channels, mostly for noise, & not sure it helped much.....

    Use flanged finish washers to attach as they wont cut into the vinyl or plywood as fast as a standard finish washer.
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    I'd go with AC Fir plywood(maybe a bit thinner than 3/4") and coat it with a good wood preservative that will soak into the plywood especially the end grains. Keep putting it on till it won't take any more and i bet you'll get many years out of the floor. Make sure the underside has some air circulating through it to let it dry out.

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    And get rid of all that foam while you are at it. If it has any left anyway. Foam is a floors worst enemy


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    CD the C and D are the grade of the Veneer C & D have more voids. A and C is a better grade of Veneer

    Avoid plywood with voids in the veneer and seal the ends.

    http://www.mcilvain.com/do-you-reall...grade-plywood/

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    I have seen regular ply coated with roof white mastiff rubber then carpet over top. That has lasted on my buddy's boat.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    Marine grade plywood has copper in it and copper will corrode aluminum. You will need to put something between the aluminum and plywood or you will have problems. Do a search to find out what you need to use.
    You're thinking of pressure treated wood.
    The green stuff uses for decks and such.
    Marine grade plywood has more layers of wood and uses waterproof glues.
    Totally different products.

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    Quote Originally Posted by DRIFTER_016 View Post
    You're thinking of pressure treated wood.
    The green stuff uses for decks and such.
    Marine grade plywood has more layers of wood and uses waterproof glues.
    Totally different products.
    No I'm not talking about the green stuff uses for decks and such. Marine grade plywood has a long history of causing problems in aluminum boats. A couple of years ago a G.C. sunk because the builder used marine grade plywood.

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    Here is another option to consider for your flooring, Compeaus in Fairbanks started carrying a product made by Itech, it has a really nice non skid on one side and a poly liner on the other side, after the parts are cut, all you need to do is paint the edges. Its not cheap, but it's a good way to go.

    Comparing it to the material that the Boat shop carries, its a significant improvement, the core plywood may be the same but the outer surface is much better.

    I would shy away from going 3/4" unless you need the strength on the whole floor for carrying mini excavators or something like that. The extra weight adds up.

    As an alternative to having a spray in bed liner put in, you may be able to use one of the DIY type materials and roll it on your self, its not spray in, but it goes in that direction.

    A note about spray in bed liner type materials, its all about surface prep, clean and dry is important, any imperfection prints through and if your plywood is not dry, the moisture in the plywood will create pinholes in the surface of the material.

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    I called Superior Hardwood to find out if the marine plywood they sell is copper treated. They called the manufacture and the answer is NO copper is in the plywood.

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    Alright, well thanks for all the info. What does the stuff at compueas run? I will give them a shot the Carpet is not good the boat has 1/2 ply wood wrapped in carpet now, from what I can tell there is a channel every 12 inches. Except in the center due to the gas tank. I am just scared I will screw something up having t move the console out and would like some help in the matter, I can do it myself and will not pay the dealer to install one for me. Scared to even ask how much they want to do it for.
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    199 a sheet and 1k for them to install it 400 bucks vs 1000 easy for me to see the reason why I should install it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    No I'm not talking about the green stuff uses for decks and such. Marine grade plywood has a long history of causing problems in aluminum boats. A couple of years ago a G.C. sunk because the builder used marine grade plywood.
    I have never heard of such a thing as this... any links to some information...?
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    Quote Originally Posted by MacGyver View Post
    No I'm not talking about the green stuff uses for decks and such. Marine grade plywood has a long history of causing problems in aluminum boats. A couple of years ago a G.C. sunk because the builder used marine grade plywood.
    DRIFTER 016....... I was wrong I was thinking about the green stuff (pressure treated plywood).
    And again you are right marine grade plywood does not have copper in it.


    http://incomingbytes.com/home-how-to...eated-plywood/

    As a DIYer, do you know the difference between Marine Grade Plywood and the more common Pressure Treated Plywood? Plywood is plywood, right? Wrong. The difference can sink or float your boat. “Wood is good” unless it fails to serve the purpose for which it is intended. To understand the differences between grades of plywood, and the meaning of the various designations, is to choose wisely and appropriately. The saying ” Be fooled at your peril” applies to many things, but when considering the construction and end uses of various types of plywood, if you are fooled into using the wrong grade, the results can be unnecessarily expensive, or even disastrous. Pressure-treated plywood, often called “Wolmanized” or P.T. plywood, is not ” Marine grade” plywood, and those designations do not make the two products arbitrarily interchangeable. Pressure treated plywood is common plywood that has been subjected to pressure treatment with chemicals to prevent the wood from decaying, or rotting. To some degree, it also discourages insect damage because of the chemicals involved . Pressure treated plywood, however, is not suitable for marine use. The treatment of plywood with copper and arsenic compounds under pressure simply does not make the plywood waterproof. Worse yet, continuous exposure to water will leach the preservative chemicals from the pressure-treated wood. It is worth repeating, pressure treated plywood is ordinary, interior-grade plywood that has been chemically-treated, and it is often made with softer woods to enable the penetration of the wood treating chemicals, with no special care effected to eliminate all gaps or voids. "Ordinary Plywood" and Exterior Grades vs. Marine Grade G1S plywood, (good-one-side) is plywood with one side graded “Select” to show no defects or gaps on the surface only, and is an aesthetic consideration. Exterior grade plywood is made with water-resistant glue, but the exterior shell is the only layer that is made void-free. There may be gaps, voids and the resulting points of weakness in the interior layers. When you cut a sheet of exterior grade plywood, you may expose a gap on the cut surface. Marine grade plywood, on the other hand, is a different creature. Marine grade plywood is assembled gap and void-free in all layers, and laminated under pressure with special, water-proof glue that holds the various layers together. Why is Marine Grade Plywood Better? When plywood is immersed, or soaked in water, the water has absolutely no effect on the glue or the strength of the lamination of marine grade plywood. Marine grade plywood will not easily delaminate, bubble, buckle, or warp. Upon cutting marine grade plywood, no voids or gaps will be discovered on the cut edges. It is also usually constructed of harder woods such as Douglas Fir, or Western Larch. Marine grade is a superior grade of plywood, and a substantially better product. Do choose carefully when selecting plywood for marine use. Although it is more expensive, marine-grade plywood, when finished appropriately, will outlast pressure-treated plywood by far. The ordinary glues used in ordinary plywood , pressure-treated or not, will eventually fail with continuous exposure to water and moisture. Product Failure, Economics and Safety When the transom on your boat fails in the middle of the lake and the motor falls off, the wisdom of having saved fifty dollars by buying cheaper pressure-treated plywood instead of marine grade plywood will come to question rather quickly. In that critical application, and other important structural applications, let us suggest that “the RIGHT wood IS good”, —and marine grade plywood is best. Now you know the difference between marine grade and pressure treated plywood. Is that Incoming I hear? tags #marine grade plywood #pressure-treated plywood #differences #DIY #skills

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    surprised nobody has mentioned diamond plate aluminum ? if your going to go for big bucks i'd get a price on metal.

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    I sure love my diamond plated deck. I'll never have to replace it either.


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