Results 1 to 14 of 14

Thread: Kimber Talkeetna, Weatherby Mark V Weathermark in.375H&H

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    22

    Default Kimber Talkeetna, Weatherby Mark V Weathermark in.375H&H

    I've been considering a Kimber Talkeetna and / or a Weatherby Mark V Weathermark in .375 H&H.

    I like the fact that they're both made in America; Kimbers in New York State, Weatherby Mark V's in California.

    I've been coming across some negative press on the Kimbers; such as the rifles that were made in Oregon compared to the ones currently made in New York are of a better quality. The main complaint is that the Kimber's made in New York have quite a variance in accuracy; you might get a good one or you might not.

    Conversely, I've not seen any negative press on the Weatherby Mark V's in regards to accuracy or anything else.

    Does anyone have any good or bad experiences with either of these rifles in an Alaskan hunting scenario?
    How did the rifle(s) shoot, handle wet,cold weather, any corrosion and/or functioning issues, etc.?

    Thanks,
    Moose Chaser

  2. #2
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak, AK.
    Posts
    1,525

    Default

    I own two Kimber Montana's, one chambered in .300wsm that I purchased new right after they first came out about 11 years ago and one chambered in .280AI that I purchased used a couple months ago. They both shoot lights out. The only issue that I've had is the feeding on my .300 was a little hard sometimes (common with wsm's in a lot of rifles), so I had the feed ramp polished and now it is much smoother. Maybe I've just got lucky but IMO a lot of the negatives I hear regarding bad accuracy, I attribute to the person pulling the trigger. They are very light wt. rifles and when you couple this with magnum calibers, you can end up with quite a kick to the shoulder equaling, in a lot of cases, severe flinching. While I'm sure this is not the case with all of the negative reviews, I also feel that it is the case with a lot of them. I've never owned or even have any experience with Weatherby's, so I can't speak to them.
    Another thing about Kimber's that I really like is the 3 position safety and CRF, especially in magnum calibers. I have yet to hunt with the .280 but I've killed many animals with the .300 including multiple moose and deer, a couple bears, a couple goats (one of which my 12 yo son killed), and a sheep. I wouldn't think twice about buying another Kimber.

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    I own two Kimber Montana's, one chambered in .300wsm that I purchased new right after they first came out about 11 years ago and one chambered in .280AI that I purchased used a couple months ago. They both shoot lights out. The only issue that I've had is the feeding on my .300 was a little hard sometimes (common with wsm's in a lot of rifles), so I had the feed ramp polished and now it is much smoother. Maybe I've just got lucky but IMO a lot of the negatives I hear regarding bad accuracy, I attribute to the person pulling the trigger. They are very light wt. rifles and when you couple this with magnum calibers, you can end up with quite a kick to the shoulder equaling, in a lot of cases, severe flinching. While I'm sure this is not the case with all of the negative reviews, I also feel that it is the case with a lot of them. I've never owned or even have any experience with Weatherby's, so I can't speak to them.
    Another thing about Kimber's that I really like is the 3 position safety and CRF, especially in magnum calibers. I have yet to hunt with the .280 but I've killed many animals with the .300 including multiple moose and deer, a couple bears, a couple goats (one of which my 12 yo son killed), and a sheep. I wouldn't think twice about buying another Kimber.
    Thanks AK Troutbum.

    As your 1st Kimber; .300WSM, is 11 years old, I'm assuming it was made in Oregon and your .280AI being new was made in New York?

    Per your comments, you're not seeing any accuracy differences or function issues other than the hard feed issue with your .300WSM, correct?

    BTW, what load did you use with the .300WSM for moose? I have a Remington 700 SCR II in .300WSM. Is has Trynite coating over the stainless components along with a Hogue grip and forearm insert.

    Moose Chaser

  4. #4
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak, AK.
    Posts
    1,525

    Default

    Both are made in Yonkers,NY. I can't remember for sure but it seem like it was '05-'06 when I got the .300 The first thing I did when I bought that rifle was purchase a box of the cheapest Winchester 180 grain ammo that Sportsmens Warehouse had and took it to the range. After firing twice at 50 yards to make sure that I was on paper, I took it out to hundred yards and my next three shots looked like this
    The rifle seems to really like Nosler Partitions and Barnes TSX bullets. 180 gr. are pretty much all I use for hunting purposes.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  5. #5
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,055

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Moose Chaser View Post
    Thanks AK Troutbum.

    As your 1st Kimber; .300WSM, is 11 years old, I'm assuming it was made in Oregon and your .280AI being new was made in New York?
    Moose Chaser
    Moose Chaser- Kimber of Oregon bankrupted in the mid 90's. All of the Montanas and 84 series guns (as well as all the 1911s) are manufactured in New York.
    I've had a couple of Montanas and a Talkeetna as well as a Longmaster Classic. The 30-06 Montana was a straight up 2MOA rifle. Never better, never worse.... some guys want better than that, but it still has done a lot of killing. The Longmaster would shoot 1 to 1.5MOA with every factory load I tried in it regardless of bullet weight or maker. Pretty hard not to like that in a hunting rifle. I didn't have the Talkeetna very long- but the new owner is happy with the accuracy and function.

    My hunting partner has a Weatherby .375 in the Fibermark and it shoots lights out.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Delta Jct, Alaska
    Posts
    992

    Default

    I have/had a half dozen of the Yonkers rifles and one of the Oregon and have had zero problems but I do a few things to all of my rifles.....polish feed ramp and check bedding etc.

    My Montana models all shoot very well and the Talkeetna is especially accurate and is on it's way to a friend as I have a pile of rifles for an old guy and can't wear em out. The Talkeetnas have a Kreiger barrel and a bore scope showed mine to be especially fine with no tool marks.

    My first Montana was very early Yonkers production in 300 WSM and it shot so well with Federal 180 TSX loads that I never bothered to load for it....several moose, a sheep, couple grizzlies etc......my buddy recently took it to Ak Pen for a 9.5 brown bear......very reliable and effective.

    As Troutbum stated, light rifles require more attention in shooting technique.

  7. #7
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Big Lake
    Posts
    8,449

    Default

    I would find one of each and shoulder them...if one speaks to you. Get it. I hate wbthy stocks. But that's just me. I like a feel good rifle. Brand don't matter much to me if I don't like to shoot it in the first place.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

  8. #8

    Default

    I have 3 Weatherby's (257, 300 and 340). All are Mark V's and all shoot great. Never had a mis-feed or a mis-fire. The 257 is my favorite because it is an ultralight and low recoil.All 3 arekilling machines (1 shot and done). Nothing but good with a Weatherby. Ammo is expensive but reloading and the occasional sale help.

  9. #9
    Member GD Yankee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    PANC
    Posts
    1,117

    Default

    If I didn't already have an Alaskanized 375, I'd get the Talkeetna. Make sure you get a new one with the "sub MOA" guarantee:

    http://www.kimberamerica.com/talkeetna

    The only thing I would change is the barrel length. I'd whack off 2", but at 24", it is still 2" shorter than a lot of "magnum" guns. Of all the "Alaskan" guns that get advertised, I'd say this is the best.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    northern alaska
    Posts
    1,159

    Default

    I gave up on Weatherbys after the new replacement stock cracked in the same place as the original. (300 wtby mag). I think the 26" 300 kicks worse than the 340/375, from what I could tell...

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    2,919

    Default

    I guided with weatherby and it got me out of some rough times.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Wisconsin
    Posts
    22

    Default

    Thanks all for the comments and advice. It appears that I'll be fine with either / or. If I decide to go with the Kimber Talkeetna, I'll get the guarantee that GD Yankee indicates in his post; "Make sure you get a new one with the "sub MOA" guarantee".

    Likewise, what BRNBR indicates makes sense; "
    I would find one of each and shoulder them...if one speaks to you. Get it. I hate wbthy stocks. But that's just me. I like a feel good rifle. Brand don't matter much to me if I don't like to shoot it in the first place."

    The only thing I'm sure on is that either one will be a .375 H&H.

    Shoot Straight,
    Moose Chaser

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    MN
    Posts
    739

    Default

    FWIW, I've had two Talkeetnas over the years and both have been tack drivers. Great setup with the kevlar stock and SS barrel.
    Excellent recoil pad and stock design that mitigates recoil. The guide had a Talkeetna too with the barrel chopped to 20".
    You'll never regret it.

  14. #14

    Default

    My Montanas and my buddies all shoot like there is no tomorrow. I know Kimbers get dinged a lot, 99% of the time it's the montanas, and that's because people go to the range and try to shoot a box or two of ammo in 10-15 minutes and wonder why it won't group with its pencil thin barrel. I don't know how many times I've asked to shoot their guns and can get them to shoot well right in front of their eyes. They usually tell me I'm lucky and leave bewildered. I like Kimbers. Rifles and 1911s.
    Henry Bowman for President

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •