Results 1 to 15 of 15

Thread: Quick Question on Using Citric Acid Powder

  1. #1

    Default Quick Question on Using Citric Acid Powder

    I see that the game saver packs are 3 ounces and directions say add 2 quarts of water. I see that they have other ingredients than the acid itself. Spice extracts. I've seen others say use 1 ounce per quart. Obviously an important factor would be what % the powder is. It's easy enough to get 100% food grade citric acid.

    So my question is would making a more potent batch present any problems? The stuff is cheap so why not add as much as will dissolve into a the water? Since I've also read that you can sprinkle the concentrate directly on the meat it's safe to say that some undissolved powder on the bottom of the spray bottle shouldn't be a concern.

    My thought is that I would rather let the meat dry than to keep re-spraying it periodically and rehydrate it. But if I want to spray once and be done of conditions allow why not apply a serious dose the first time. Also if I do need to reapply why not skip the water and use it dry and really create a nice dry crust on the surface that should really last and not need another application.

    Nothing is more tragic than losing meat after all that goes into it including taking the life.

  2. #2

    Default

    Good questions:

    1. Powder citric acid is 100% acid, so the Game Saver is that plus whatever proprietary ingredients make it a special product. You can buy it cheaper in bulk, and that's all you need.

    2. A mixture of 1-2 oz per qt of water is enough. Once you reach a water solution that is acidic (<3pH is really acidic), then you've achieved the best mixture. The 1-2 oz/qt is a ballpark range that you can dial in according to what size spray bottle you're using (most are 6-8 oz volume), so add a heaping Tablespoon of powder to your spray bottle and taste it for sour sharpness. If it's really acidic to taste, it's enough to keep flies off your meat.

    3. The first dose will stay moist on the surface for longer, since meat has sweating and draining to do...so re-application will be bnecessary after the initial 24 hours. From the 2nd application, the spray will evaporate quickker and meat will dry readily by wind and warmth. Repply every 36-48 hours after the 2nd dose and you should be good to go. Usually after post harvest day 4 or 5 there is no need to reapply, IMO. At this point Glycogen has converted to lactic acid in the meat tissue and the rigormortis has come and gone, so surface pH should be stable enough to carry out your most effective field exit strategy and final meat processing.

    4. Dont sprinkle acid onto the surface because it wastes powder and can burn the surface of the meat unnecessarily. The moisture is minimal in the big picture, your goal is not to ruin the flavor with excessive acid application.

    larry

  3. #3

    Default

    Thanks Larry. I posted that after reading a few quotes from you on Rokslide. I've never used the citric before but just ordered some and plan to use it from now on. I tend to overdo things to be sure of myself and anything I can do to do a better job of caring for meat is a plus. I might experiment with some powder directly on meat to see what happens. I'm not afraid to spend a few bucks if it helps.

    How's that baby bud???

  4. #4

    Default

    I can help you predict what direct contact with citric acid powder will do to the surface.

    The texture will change visually, and the color ranges you can expect range in the gray tones. The treatment we exercise to our game meat is in the realms of "preservation" and "salvage all edible meat for human consumption."

    And the depth of trim to reach viable edible meat can range depending on our handling methods, so i'd caution you to avoid using powder directly without water to evenly distribute the acid solution...you'll likely concentrate some areas with denser acid and that will result in uneven depth during trimming. On a moose that equates to a meal or two loss due to unnecessary trim over the entire load of vittles.

    just food for thought

    LB

  5. #5
    Member akgun&ammo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    983

    Default

    Larry,

    if it's edible.. but discolored due to citric acid..

    can you just trim sparingly, and add to sausage grind??????

    I've wondered this for long time.

    haven't used yet due to been close to the meat locker last few years...

    man. I love having that meat cooler in my yard.

    Chris

    Chris

  6. #6

    Default

    You bet, trim down to fresh viable meat and there should be no "off" flavors due to the acid application.

    You'll notice the surface texture and color line of change when you dissect any meat (cross section view) that has been treated with citric acid. The depth or thickness of this affected surface layer will be determined by field storage time and conditions as well as how much acid was used over a length of time (i.e., meat treated for 4-5 days vs 1 day will vary in depth of trim requirement).

    So, the depth you'll need to trim the meat surface to reach fresh viable food (without absorption odors and discoloration) will vary due to field time and how you handled it. Some discolored meat might taste fine, while some areas taste more wild or "gamey" due to anything that changed its flavor (time and conditions of storage).

    For example, take a fresh steak and give it a squeeze of lemon or lime juice, let that sit for an hour...then cut a cross section and observe the surface depth affected by the acid. You'll see this thin layer that is completely edible but remains a little tangy when you eat it, right?

    Now, let that steak sit in acid for 8 hours and then cut a new cross section and measure the the depth layer of surface change...you'll see that the layer you're interested in trimming has grown in thickness, and the taste of that 8-hour marinade isn't as tasty as the 1-hour soaked meat bite. So, how much you'll need to trim depends on how much acid was used and how long the meat has rested in varying temps and moisture conditions with acid on the surface.

    I think that answers the question, let me know if i missed your point.

    larry

  7. #7
    Member coop22250's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Anchor Point
    Posts
    271

    Default

    I have a cheap solution for killing bacteria on carcasses. I was a USDA meat inspector in every species of slaughter plant. What is used to kill organisms of all types is called acetic acid. It is a 50/50 solution of common vinegar/water that comes at a 5% acidity in the bottle from the grocery store. It is primarily aimed at E.coli but has been validated in lot of studies as lethal to all bacteria by aerobic plate count tests . A common spray bottle is used to apply it, and it should dry fairly quick. It is the acidity that kills the bacteria and it is very effective. This is used on pretty much all red meat species. Citric powder is in the same class as this, considered an acetic and just as effective but I use vinegar because is readily available about anywhere.

  8. #8
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,749

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by coop22250 View Post
    I have a cheap solution for killing bacteria on carcasses. I was a USDA meat inspector in every species of slaughter plant. What is used to kill organisms of all types is called acetic acid. It is a 50/50 solution of common vinegar/water that comes at a 5% acidity in the bottle from the grocery store. It is primarily aimed at E.coli but has been validated in lot of studies as lethal to all bacteria by aerobic plate count tests . A common spray bottle is used to apply it, and it should dry fairly quick. It is the acidity that kills the bacteria and it is very effective. This is used on pretty much all red meat species. Citric powder is in the same class as this, considered an acetic and just as effective but I use vinegar because is readily available about anywhere.
    Wiping down meat with a vinegar/water solution is one of the first things my father taught me some 50 years ago. People have been dong that for eons. I still do and haven't used the citric acid yet but it seems to be pretty popular....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    282

    Default

    Is the vinegar/water mix strong enough to to keep the flies off the meat?

  10. #10

    Default

    Anyone know who carries citric acid powder in Anchorage? Something that barney's or one of the other outfitters has? Or just the grocery store?

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    Alaska Mill feed and Seed

  12. #12
    Member Ben XCR's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Between Anchorage and Homer
    Posts
    207

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by flyman683 View Post
    Anyone know who carries citric acid powder in Anchorage? Something that barney's or one of the other outfitters has? Or just the grocery store?
    Any feed store will have it. Alaska Butchers Supply, most natural food stores, and anywhere that carries a good selection of canning supplies. Freddie's most likely does though I've never looked there. It's all over the place as it's a multi-use item.
    The more you talk, the more I wish I was deaf.

  13. #13
    Member Daveintheburbs's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    648

    Default

    Arctic brewing supply too

  14. #14

    Default

    Thanks all, grabbed some today.

  15. #15
    New member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Posts
    11

    Default

    I have found that soaking the game bags with citric acid solution at home and letting the bags dry before packing for the trip is effective. That way when you load meat into the bags the citric acid coats things without any spraying or other effort in the field. It works great and is low maintenance.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •