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Thread: Coming from Juneau

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    Member Leryt's Avatar
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    Default Coming from Juneau

    Hey guys so I'm looking at moving up from Juneau Alaska with my wife and kids. My wife is a big fisher woman and so I'm curious on how the fishing is in the Fairbanks area as well as what there is to fish? I see where it says Grayling Char Pike and troutt. How good is the fishing and how big do the fish get? What's the best to eat? All I've ever fished for here is salmon and a little bit of Dolly Varden. Of course halibut as well. Looking at bringing up my 6 to 15 pound ugly sticks and I think those will probably be overkill for most of the stuff but they're good rods plus my three to six pound ugly sticks. Thanks for any help and information!

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    Member AKducks's Avatar
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    let me answer that for you!

    Fairbanks fishing-

    from the road system is mostly grayling close to town, within an 1-2 hours from town you have the Chena, Chatinka, Piledriver slough, badger slough as the big grayling producers close to town- grayling are good to eat the day you catch them but don't freeze well (note check regs chena and badger slough are C&R only)

    there are pike around Fairbanks off the road system, but the are highly kept secrets, if you get a Jon boat, you can head down into minto flats for some pretty good (actually pretty great) pike fishing.

    salmon-
    ok some people fish for kings in the chena river (its been emergency order C&R the last couple years and don't expect that to change) but they are fire engine red and pretty skinny, no good Juneauite would touch them (sorry Fairbanks locals!) the big salmon fisheries for Fairbanks are the gulkana and Klutina river, theses are 4-5 hours from Fairbanks though, not a afternoon trip. but you can catch lots of sockeye and have good chances at Kings (talk to Gulkana rafting for more info on that area he rents out rafts and knows the rivers). the delta Clearwater gets coho too but I don't think they are good eating (Delta Clearwater also gets really good Grayling).


    Trout- the only trout you will find that are not stocked are south of the Alaska range, the gulkana has some and the most streams along the parks highway have them (I've never fished the parks, so not much info on that area).


    here are some good sites to check out:


    http://www.alaskansalmonslayers.com/
    http://www.gulkanaraftrental.com/
    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static/re...nadrainage.pdf


    hope that helps

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    Member Leryt's Avatar
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    Awesome, thanks for the response. Like the sounds of the Sockeye! Weekends trips will be awesome....casting to catch the sockeyes?
    I've heard the Greyling, pike and Burbot are all decent. Greyling is like trout, needs to be eaten fresh, and the burbot is like cod, best beer battered and fried. How is the pike? Never had and of these.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leryt View Post
    How is the pike? Never had and of these.
    Pike is good but kind of a PITA because it's bony and in particular the y bones can be difficult to get out. There are some good youtube videos, but also a lot of people either pickle or chop pike. You can find pike in sloughs but your best bet within holllering distance of Fairbanks is some of the gravel pits in the south part of town or North Pole.

    We don't batter burbot. It's an extremely tasty fish and you don't have to do much to it to have a very, very tasty meal.

    And grayling fishing is seriously catch-and-release on the Chena and tributaries. You can keep the ones you catch in ponds/lakes, but there are limits (although the limits apply to stocked fish, and graylings are no longer stocked - probably should check with F&G if you plan to keep more than 10). You can keep some out of the Chatanika (rules changed recently) but you'll need to know some geography about what's covered and what's not. Read the regs.
    Mushing Tech: squeezing the romance out of dog mushing one post at a time

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    Member Leryt's Avatar
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    Awesome! Thanks, I plan on learning the area pretty well before I jump into it, but wanted to get ideas and advice from yall. Thanks so much for the info!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leryt View Post
    Awesome! Thanks, I plan on learning the area pretty well before I jump into it, but wanted to get ideas and advice from yall. Thanks so much for the info!
    Forgot to mention that if you haven't prepared burbot before it can be a little different. ADF&G has a good video on how to clean it: http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/index.cfm...ucation.burbot
    Mushing Tech: squeezing the romance out of dog mushing one post at a time

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    Member Leryt's Avatar
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    So I've got a couple of 3-6# Ugly Stiks, a couple 6-15# Ugly Stiks and one 6-25# Ugly Stik and a 6ish# fly rod (was trying to learn to fly fish, still haven't attempted it though). Then for lures I've got some small creek lures, panther martens, rooster tails, etc, some larger size stuff, pixies and crocodiles, and then some large ones that I've used for salmon, Mepps Flying C's, Crocodiles, Kodiak Customs. What kind of gear will I be looking at needing to pick up to fish the Faribanks areas? Rods, reels, etc?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Leryt View Post
    So I've got a couple of 3-6# Ugly Stiks, a couple 6-15# Ugly Stiks and one 6-25# Ugly Stik and a 6ish# fly rod (was trying to learn to fly fish, still haven't attempted it though). Then for lures I've got some small creek lures, panther martens, rooster tails, etc, some larger size stuff, pixies and crocodiles, and then some large ones that I've used for salmon, Mepps Flying C's, Crocodiles, Kodiak Customs. What kind of gear will I be looking at needing to pick up to fish the Faribanks areas? Rods, reels, etc?
    I wouldn't buy anything until/unless you find that what you've got isn't working.

    I don't fish much with gear myself but I do occasionally on the ponds, and probably the most common mistake I see people making there is putting a ton of weight on their line so they can get some distance on their casts. They are going to miss the bite - most of the fish in there are small - and a lot of time the goal isn't to get the lure or bait into the middle of the pond but to get it over some structure, which might be right in front of them.

    That said, the one thing that's not on your list that I'd definitely have on hand for grayling fishing is a curly tail grub (Mister Twister) on a small jighead. They seem to really go for those, esp. the light-colored and glow-in-the-dark ones.
    Mushing Tech: squeezing the romance out of dog mushing one post at a time

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    Member Leryt's Avatar
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    Thanks mlshore! I don't have any of those so I will grab some up there. Yeah I was just trying to think if I should get rid of anything before I come up. I don't like getting rid of equipment but if space dictates I will do what I have to do. I'm doing the same thing right now with my waterfowl decoys ...... should it stay or should it go I hate these questions lol.

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