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Thread: LONG Term Powder STORAGE........Question.......???

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    Default LONG Term Powder STORAGE........Question.......???

    What would be the best temperature and environment for long term storage of un-opened powder.......???

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    Dunno about best temp, but stable temp is the critical factor from all I've learned. Dunno what high end limit would be but room temp has proven just fine for me. Bought a bunch of the old surplus 4831 at 50 cents a pound back in 1970. And it was old then. Korean war era maybe? I'm still using it today 45 years later.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

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    DRY!!!!! cool and STABLE.... temp IS the BEST. YOUR!!!! Powder will LAST Forever...... !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! ??????????????????????

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    For me the most stable temperature is in the ground and covered with lots of moss. Pretty much steady at 37 to 39 degrees.

    What about long term storage of primers.......???

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    Vacuum seal is your friend. Primer packs aren't air tight, and therefore they are subject to humidity. I'm using 20 year old primer right now. I seal them and date them the moment I buy them.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

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    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    PRETTY....much The Same for PRIMERS!!!!!!! Cool,,,,,,, and Dry!!!!!???????HeAt,,,,,and MoIsTuRe, Are YOUR Enemy, or is that Enema???????!!!!!
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    I certainly believe in taking reasonable precautions.

    I keep my powders and primers in my ģrahge, where the temp varys, cept the BP, which is in an out building where the temp matches the current weather conditions.

    I calculate they will outlast me AND all my known family and friends.

    It may be more useful to entertain stories of powder and primers that spoiled.

    SOTN
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
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    I read an article about Unique powder. The factory buried a keg shortly after Unique first was introduced and dug it up about 50yrs later. They dried it and it tested the same as the then currently made powder. Another experiment was done by storing the powder under water for quite a while then dried and it tested ok as well. Gun cotton (nitro cellulose) is made by soaking cotton in nitric acid and then washing several times in water. I don't believe water has an adverse effect on powder unless it's still wet when you want to load it. I believe oxygen is the culprit in destroying stored power. I have powders that I know to be 40 or more years old that look and act like new. I don't know when W 230 was discontinued but I stil have some of that that works like new.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rbuck351 View Post
    I read an article about Unique powder. The factory buried a keg shortly after Unique first was introduced and dug it up about 50yrs later. They dried it and it tested the same as the then currently made powder. Another experiment was done by storing the powder under water for quite a while then dried and it tested ok as well. Gun cotton (nitro cellulose) is made by soaking cotton in nitric acid and then washing several times in water. I don't believe water has an adverse effect on powder unless it's still wet when you want to load it. I believe oxygen is the culprit in destroying stored power. I have powders that I know to be 40 or more years old that look and act like new. I don't know when W 230 was discontinued but I stil have some of that that works like new.
    Primers are next to impossible to disable, too.

    Get'em wet, they dry out and work just fine. I once tested some with oil, and most of them went, at least "poof".

    I've concluded, with my tests, what I've also heard, that oil only temporarily disables primers.

    I know that some folks wear rubber gloves when handling primers to keep from contaminating them. What do you think?

    SOTN
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  10. #10

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    About 15 years back I bought Remington primers that were bad right out of the box. Probably 20% didn't go off. I had some CCI primers in an unheated storage shed for about 10 years once upon a time. Half didn't go off. Never had the slightest problem with Federals, but I learned my lessons and have always taken care of them. The 20 YOA's I'm using right now are Federal, as will be any others I buy. Period. Even 1 primer in 100 being bad will spoil your confidence in a company and teach lessons about handling. No gloves here, but maybe I don't read the internet enough to have anyone convince me I need to.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

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    Primers bad right outta the box, that percentage, even 1 out of 100, yeah I see what you mean. I would certainly wonder if I stored them wrong, or done something wrong.

    Now, I had primer FTFs that I kinda, sorta, attributed to the brand, Remington, BUT, right now, I have reason to think the problem was the gun and light hammer strikes. I won't know for awhile, until I get my gun back.

    When this gun didn't fire, presumably because of a light primer strike, CCIs would always fire on the 2nd try, while the Rems never would/did.

    If that is/was always the case, it might prove only a difference, rather than a flaw.... A Primer can be bad, but there can also be a difference in brands.

    Example, I buyed my Lovely Wife a 38 Special volver, that was fitting, A Colt New Police Positive, mdl.

    The firing pin pierced the primers, pretty regular on my Handloads using Federal primers. (Whass Rong with this gun?) (Wat am I gonna do?)

    I tried FLs, and no Problem. Also, no problem with Handloads using CCI primers. Problem solved.


    Not saying Federal pistol primers are BAD, just not Good for this gun.

    SOTN
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    ...just not Good for this gun.
    Important distinction and lesson for every gun.... Finding out what it likes and doesn't. Same as load development. The most rifles I have in any one caliber are actually 58 caliber traditional muzzleloaders. Five of them. Can't tell you why so many, but I can say I like and shoot them all. But every single one has made up its own mind what load combo it likes best, and none of them are the same. My three 257 Roberts are the same. Every one prefers a different load- one with Winchester cases and the other two with Federal cases. Go figger, but that's the private language of each gun, and we have to learn it.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    Primers are next to impossible to disable, too.

    Get'em wet, they dry out and work just fine. I once tested some with oil, and most of them went, at least "poof".

    SOTN
    So how does one go about drying them out? We all know here in AK its not very dry. I was thinking of a toaster over, that has a low setting or maybe just sealing them in a bag/ box filled with desiccant.

    Quote Originally Posted by rbuck351 View Post
    I read an article about Unique powder. The factory buried a keg shortly after Unique first was introduced and dug it up about 50yrs later. They dried it and it tested the same as the then currently made powder. Another experiment was done by storing the powder under water for quite a while then dried and it tested ok as well.

    Same here, any ideas on drying it out? This item i would not want to put in a toaster oven (for obvious reasons, lol).



    While i am deployed i have been shipping powder and primers to a friends house in NY, it is being stored in a travel trailer locked in a garage with no heat or insulation so its subjected to the Upstate NY winters. The primers were put into ammo cans with some desiccant packs so im not really worried about them. But the powder, all of it is in their factory bottles, unopened... i have several thousand dollars worth of powder that i am hoping doesn't go bad, its been in storage since 2012. (i figured it would be somewhat easier to store it in NY and transport it up on the ferry when im done over here rather than to worry about having supply issues getting powder in AK.)
    Josh
    In Egypt on the Sinai peninsula helping to take care of the ISIS problem.

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    Quote Originally Posted by akula682 View Post
    I was thinking of a toaster over, that has a low setting or maybe just sealing them in a bag/ box filled with desiccant.
    If you don't already own one, start watching garage sales for a food dehydrator. I spent a whole $5 for mine. Dandy for this and a lot of other jobs.
    "Lay in the weeds and wait, and when you get your chance to say something, say something good."
    Merle Haggard

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    that crossed my mind but i didnt think it would be enough.
    Josh
    In Egypt on the Sinai peninsula helping to take care of the ISIS problem.

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