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Thread: So why do cod get worms, but halibut don't?

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    Default So why do cod get worms, but halibut don't?

    First off, it's never bothered me too much to fillet a cod & have to use the tip of the knife to remove worms. Unless the fillet just looks like a seething mass of spaghetti, then I just toss it.

    But I got to wondering why cod get these parasites, yet halibut normally don't. At least, I've never run across a worm in the halibut I've filleted. Presumably, they both share the same forage and alot of the same habitat, so it's a bit puzzling to me.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    If you really want to see if your halibut fillets have worms soak them in cold water for a few minutes and then look closely. Not near as much/big as cod, butt they still have them.

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    Supporting Member Old John's Avatar
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    Look a little closer around the belly area of a halibut.. Especially the bigger and older halibut.. extra protein.

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    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
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    Ya, halibut get worms, that larger they are the more they'll have.
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  5. #5

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    Oh yeah. We "candle" all our halibut (shine a bright light through the fillets from the back, toward you).

    For folks who haven't seen them, it's mostly a case of "what you don't see won't hurt you." You can count on them down in the belly flaps, but there's enough elsewhere to be worth checking.

    Salmon have worms, too. Just harder to see. We don't bother looking for and removing them. Heck, even the beef you eat has worms. USDA inspection doesn't guarantee worm-free beef. It only sezz they're below a certain concentration.

    Live with them or pick them out. We get the ones we can see and forget the rest.

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Don't look, don't tell !


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    Don't worry they all cook down in the grilling process.

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    Member carolinaboy's Avatar
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    And if the first page of replies wasn't enough wormy fish info....here's another 2 from ten years ago. Funny how this stuff cycles back around. BrownBear had a reply back then, too.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...rms-in-halibut

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    Huh. How about that.

    No more raw halibut for me. I used to love taking thin slices from the carcass & wrapping them with HOT steamed rice and a tiny splash of worcestershire. Somehow it just doesn't seem as appealing now - gonna cook it through & through!

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Zeek View Post
    Huh. How about that.

    No more raw halibut for me. I used to love taking thin slices from the carcass & wrapping them with HOT steamed rice and a tiny splash of worcestershire. Somehow it just doesn't seem as appealing now - gonna cook it through & through!
    If you like raw fish, just freeze it for 2-3 days first. It will still have the same taste/texture, but any parasites will be dead.

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    Member bkbaker's Avatar
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    Commercial sushi is always frozen. Salmon, cod, and halibut have worms. But never let ur wife see one before or after dinner.


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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    If you like raw fish, just freeze it for 2-3 days first. It will still have the same taste/texture, but any parasites will be dead.
    But make sure to thaw slowly (always if you can) but most certainly for raw eating. In the fridge for a day usually works for me and then it stays firm and not watery.

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    Member FishGod's Avatar
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    The next time you catch a halibut, look at the liver. It's a common spot for Anisakid larvae. I've yet to find a salt or freshwater species of fish that doesn't have some kind of parasite.
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

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    Member Anythingalaska's Avatar
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    Yep basically all commonly eaten alaskan fish either have or have the potential to have works. That being said the biggest worms I've seen in a filet of fish was a piece of Lingcod that I was in the middle of eating. Had to be .100" in diameter and maybe an inch long if I recall. The wormiest fish I've seen have to be herring or P cod.

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    Member FishGod's Avatar
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    Years ago I was sampling lingcod and while I was working on one particular fish, I noticed something moving out of the corner of my eye. I looked towards the gut section and a piece of "rope" was moving. I grabbed my tweezers and proceeded to pull a six foot tapeworm from the abdomen.
    Your bait stinks and your boat is ugly

  16. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by FishGod View Post
    Years ago I was sampling lingcod and while I was working on one particular fish, I noticed something moving out of the corner of my eye. I looked towards the gut section and a piece of "rope" was moving. I grabbed my tweezers and proceeded to pull a six foot tapeworm from the abdomen.
    I pulled one about that size out of me mid winter after spending a spring and summer camped out. Surprise, surprise!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Garyak View Post
    I pulled one about that size out of me....
    And how, prey tell, did you manage to do that...???..........lol
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    And how, prey tell, did you manage to do that...???..........lol
    I kinda picture climbing a rope..... Backwards!

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    Quote Originally Posted by FishGod View Post
    Years ago I was sampling lingcod and while I was working on one particular fish, I noticed something moving out of the corner of my eye. I looked towards the gut section and a piece of "rope" was moving. I grabbed my tweezers and proceeded to pull a six foot tapeworm from the abdomen.
    Definitely do not look inside the gut of an arctic char.....the worst thing in freshwater in AK that I have observed.....tapeworm city.

  20. #20
    Member JR2's Avatar
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    I gutted a ling last summer that must of had a billion worms in it, the gits looked like a boiling pot of noodles... Flesh was fine but sure didn't show the wife.
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

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