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Thread: Getting a huge fish in the boat

  1. #1
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    Default Getting a huge fish in the boat

    Ok, lets assume we are really lucky fishing and we hook into a monster halibut or salmon shark. For the sake or arguement let's say the fish is 300 plus.
    With only the wife and I on board I know for a fact we could not gaff it and pull it over the gunnels. It was all my brother and I could do to pull over a 175 pound halibut once.
    The cleats on my boat are thru bolted and I was tossing around the idea of buying a small block and tackle, attaching it to two cleats on the other side of the boat, tieing the fish around the tail and then pulling it into the boat (after it was dead of course). With us helping it along with gaffs
    Sure hope we run into this "problem" someday and am looking to some input as to if my idea is a good one. Looking for other ideas as well that will work.
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    Default Similar logic

    You know last time my dad and I were out we started talking about what we'd do if a full sized adult went over board (wearing a PFD of course) but was unconscious. Lets say a 250lb male

    Using only what we normally have on board this is what we came up with....

    We could use a ratchet strap as a come-a-long to hoist the body into the boat. Hook one end to the gunnel on one side of the boat, stretch the strap across and to the vicitm. (Under the arms type harness) The nice thing about the human body is if you can get the head and shoulder in the rest will soon follow.


    I don't know for sure if it would work but the only other option was to drop the inflateable boat down and to get the unconscious victim into the inflateable.

    Anyway, on to your question.... AFTER that bad boy is DEAD, tail him and then ratchet strap him on board, or work it into your inflateable and tow it home....

    Well it's an idea anyway....

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    I have thought about how nice it would be to have the same problem. So far I have decided that if it happened I would hog tie it so to speak into a U shape, drag it up onto the swim deck, tie it off and then head back to the harbor to deal with offloading and transporting to a table. Seems like that would work but I have a deck some boats don't.

    I saw a larger boat last year that had a similar problem. They tied a rope around or through the head and one on the tail. Pulled it up from one end as far as they could, tied it off and then did the same at the other tying it off against the outside of the boat. The fish was still there after a couple hours and I assumed they probably just made way when it was time.

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    If you hog tie a fish and try to lift it up will the rope rip out of the head? Where exactly would you tie the rope into the head?
    Tennessee

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    I had previously thought about that and then again when I mentioned it and best thing I could come up with would be to go through both jaws. I wouldn't think it would be near as difficult to get it up on the swim deck vs in the boat but I could be wrong. Dead weight is dead weight. For now all I can do is wish to have this problem but it would be nice to know what has actually worked for others. There has to be someone that has actually done this though that could enlighten both of us.

    On the other hand while I'm sitting here thinking about it a better idea might be to hook up to it with a rope and drag it over the side using my powerwinch pot puller from the opposite side of the boat. I'll have to look into this further to see if I can actually do it this way otherwise I know I could hook the puller up to a rope and a cleat and accomplish the same thing. My puller is on a removable mount that I made for my boat so the second thought is for sure possible. Hmmm....... now I need a fish to try it on.
    Last edited by AKBighorn; 07-02-2007 at 23:31. Reason: addition

  6. #6

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    take a regular rope, splice in a loop, drop it throught it's mouth and out the gills. Typically this is what we do after shark hooking and a good bonk to kill the fish and bleed out. So far we havent ripped the head off yet.

    Two of us heaved a 275 over the rail last summer. This summer the boss and a client also drug a 275 over the rail already. I've managed a 120 solo this year. A hay hook works excellent on the fish up to a 100 or so lbs.

    I have seen a 200+ (mind you this is long before I knew what a big fish was so it could have been bigger or smaller to some degree), tied off to the side of a skiff and drug back to the valdez docs this way. The boat was trailered and hauled with the fish hanging on the side.

    Last summer I know of a 420 pounder being heaved over the rail. Though I dont have the details as to how, I'm sure it took the cpt and all the clients to do so as there was no door to heave it through on the swim step. When I saw the behmoth the fish was laying on the deck.

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    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    Default Here is a thought!

    It's a Big Fish, more importantly it is a Big Female, with all of the great genetics to reproduce millions of her kind! I say snap a picture and let her go. That's what I do

  8. #8

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    i agree with cusackla. those big ones aren't even good eating.

  9. #9

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    Yes, let the big females go free. It's not worth the hassle, and there not good to eat.

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    Member avidflyer's Avatar
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    I had to pull my dad back aboard a commercial boat when I was 11... when the time comes that you have to deal with getting a human back into the boat, adreneline is a wonderfull thing and you wont even think about it till afterwards when you stop and ask yourself... how the #$%$ did I just do that..
    A big fish is another story.. 386 was the biggest we ever had to get in the boat, but it took 3 guys and the hydralic reel to get it in.. I would never do it again. like others have said, anything over about 150 get a picture taken and then back down they go!

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by cusackla View Post
    It's a Big Fish, more importantly it is a Big Female, with all of the great genetics to reproduce millions of her kind! I say snap a picture and let her go. That's what I do
    That's a good thought there. Depending on exactly how big it is I might do the same however I haven't been fortunate to catch a 50lbr yet ( although my wife has ) so if I get a big one I'm not so sure I would have it in me to let it go of course a fish in the 300lb range would be insane for me to think I could get back to land. That being said I really do prefer halibut in the 10-20lb range, I'll take them any day. They just melt in your mouth.

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    Default How big is to big to eat?

    This is slightly off the subject of the thread, but for Halibut, how big is to big to keep to eat?

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    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red head View Post
    This is slightly off the subject of the thread, but for Halibut, how big is to big to keep to eat?

    From what I was told at a fish store here in Anchorage.. 80lb is the biggest they will sale.
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    Member Swissy's Avatar
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    75-80 is the biggest I'll keep. But in all honesty, I prefer the 20-40 range as they are so tender and juicy!! Plus they're easier to catch :-D

    That being said, it'll be really hard to let that 250+ monster go and not have a pic of it hanging off the arm of my boat to brag about. But... so far no worries about that dilemma!!
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