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Thread: The Savage 99 thread

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    Default The Savage 99 thread

    People seem to really like the old lever guns. My favorites are Winchesters, but I have several Marlins and Savages also. When I was 13 or so, dad handed me an octagon barreled 99 in .30-30. Long barrel. I ran that thing into the mud many times, and even into a rotten stump once. Dad patiently cleaned the barrel until finally the last time just before dark. He had some comments about it that time. I told him it was just to long and heavy for me to pack all day, and could I please hunt with Uncle Normans Winchester Carbine in .25-35 next weekend. Dad made it happen and I shot my first deer with that 94. I did hunt many times later with that 99 in .30-30 and also a take down featherweight in .22 Hi Power. Still have both of them.
    Post up a 99 story, if you will.
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    After cutting my teeth on 94's in the Southwest, I kinda looked down my nose at 99s. Until I moved to the Northwest where 99's were king and 94's got to look at a lot of raised nostrils. Didn't take me long to figure out why either.

    Every single 99 in our extended hunting circle (and there were a lot of them) was outfitted with a receiver sight. I was invited out to a ranch to do a spot of branding, following which there would be a big barbecue and some shooting. Brought the borrowed 94, and after watching those guys shoot a while, I never pulled it out of the case. About 90% were 300 Savages with a few 308's in the mix.

    Those guys tacked up paper plates at a measured 200 yards with all shots offhand, and seldom missed! Side bets made on plates out at 300 with shooting from any position, and the winner usually had to hit 4 out of 5 shots to win the $1 a man stake.

    Sound pretty incredible? Looked incredible too, because when I shouldered one of their rifles I couldn't even SEE the paper plate behind the bead front sight.

    Then I learned the secret, one which has served me well to this day.

    You don't put the whole bead on the target. You sight in so POI is at the very top edge of the bead at your chosen range. You don't COVER the target with your bead- you cut it. Those guys were all sighted in that way at 200 yards, and at 300 yards they would just cut the top of the plate with their front sight and usually drop the rounds into the middle or lower half of the plate. On deer the "top of the plate" was the flat line of the deer's back, with rounds dropping into the lungs.

    Yup. Once I finally got out of college and onto a regular paycheck, I assembled enough jingle to buy a 99 of my own. Been shooting them ever since with the 358 sighted in at 150 with 200's, the 308 at 200 with 165's, the 250 at 200 with 100's, as is the 300 with 150's. My 284 wears an ancient Weaver K-4 scope, and it's sighted in at 300 with 150's.

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    I have a Savage 99 in 250/3000. According to Savage Arms it was manufactured in 1937 or '38.

    It was my grandfathers then my mothers. During that time it put many California Blacktails on the table and dispatched many critters that were not wanted on my parents dairy farm.

    My mother let me use it for many years before she gave it to me. I used it to take my first California Blacktail.

    It also put many a Caribou on the table during the 18 years I lived in Barrow.

    It will be passed down to one of my boys.


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    Cool gun!!


    It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to open one's mouth and remove all doubt.
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    After cutting my teeth on 94's in the Southwest, I kinda looked down my nose at 99s. Until I moved to the Northwest where 99's were king and 94's got to look at a lot of raised nostrils. Didn't take me long to figure out why either.

    Every single 99 in our extended hunting circle (and there were a lot of them) was outfitted with a receiver sight. I was invited out to a ranch to do a spot of branding, following which there would be a big barbecue and some shooting. Brought the borrowed 94, and after watching those guys shoot a while, I never pulled it out of the case. About 90% were 300 Savages with a few 308's in the mix.

    Those guys tacked up paper plates at a measured 200 yards with all shots offhand, and seldom missed! Side bets made on plates out at 300 with shooting from any position, and the winner usually had to hit 4 out of 5 shots to win the $1 a man stake.

    Sound pretty incredible? Looked incredible too, because when I shouldered one of their rifles I couldn't even SEE the paper plate behind the bead front sight.

    Then I learned the secret, one which has served me well to this day.

    You don't put the whole bead on the target. You sight in so POI is at the very top edge of the bead at your chosen range. You don't COVER the target with your bead- you cut it. Those guys were all sighted in that way at 200 yards, and at 300 yards they would just cut the top of the plate with their front sight and usually drop the rounds into the middle or lower half of the plate. On deer the "top of the plate" was the flat line of the deer's back, with rounds dropping into the lungs.

    Yup. Once I finally got out of college and onto a regular paycheck, I assembled enough jingle to buy a 99 of my own. Been shooting them ever since with the 358 sighted in at 150 with 200's, the 308 at 200 with 165's, the 250 at 200 with 100's, as is the 300 with 150's. My 284 wears an ancient Weaver K-4 scope, and it's sighted in at 300 with 150's.
    Thanks for the post. Made me smile from ear to ear.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hogfamily View Post
    I have a Savage 99 in 250/3000. According to Savage Arms it was manufactured in 1937 or '38.

    It was my grandfathers then my mothers. During that time it put many California Blacktails on the table and dispatched many critters that were not wanted on my parents dairy farm.

    My mother let me use it for many years before she gave it to me. I used it to take my first California Blacktail.

    It also put many a Caribou on the table during the 18 years I lived in Barrow.

    It will be passed down to one of my boys.

    Loving it. Hope your descendants enjoy it as much as you have. And put it to good use.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    I've some pictures of a very beat up savage 99 and a couple bull moose it was used for in this thread:
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...-358-Win/page2

    Some of my greatest hunting memories happened with a 99 in my hands:

    I'm skinning a beaver taken early in the morning for my food, as the river became turbid, no grayling to be caught.
    Luskinikn bread is cooking on the Coleman stove.
    A bellowing grunt echos off the canyon walls, a warrior of a moose. Broken brow tine, cut up ears.
    I swiftly seek my 99 propped up against the tarped cook shack.
    I'm hiding behind the willows, mimicking his grunt over the noise of the swift river water.
    Every step he takes, he grunts back, eyes bugging out of his head.
    150 yards away, he dares to swim across the river to trample me.
    I catch him with one 275 grain bullet just as he committed to the charge
    He drops like lightning struck, right at the deep rivers edge
    The big warrior of his land, raises his head once more
    A quick shuck of the lever, i thread another right behind his ear.
    I canoe to him, I pray to his spirit, and thank him, for giving himself to me.

  8. #8

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    Dang it! I had a couple of 99s in 300 Savage and I think one in 308 but they were for the most part trading stock. I actually bought some brass and dies for one real clean 300 but it turned out to be a victim of someone's tinkeritis and it had issues.

    I have never killed anything with a 99......not for sure if I have even fired one. I guess there is a flower that I have failed to smell.

  9. #9

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    Up in the Adirondack's in the good old days , the blue collar gun was the Win 94 and the white collar gun was the Savage 99. Both killed truck loads of Whitetails.

  10. #10
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    I've also got one in 250/3000. It's a great caribou gun. I shot my first caribou with it off the S. fork of the Kuskoquim when I was 13. It hasn't seen much use lately since I can't get it to zero any more. It's a takedown model and the key between the barrel and the action is worn which gives the barrel a very slight knock when you twist it. I'm leery to have it worked on, but it would be a great gun for my son...
    AKmud
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    Quote Originally Posted by AKmud View Post
    I've also got one in 250/3000. It's a great caribou gun. I shot my first caribou with it off the S. fork of the Kuskoquim when I was 13. It hasn't seen much use lately since I can't get it to zero any more. It's a takedown model and the key between the barrel and the action is worn which gives the barrel a very slight knock when you twist it. I'm leery to have it worked on, but it would be a great gun for my son...
    Hopefully you can find someone competent enough to tighten the takedown. That said, I have heard the some of the Savage barrels were made with 'softer' steel and could wear out sooner. Many of these old guns can have the barrel relined if needed. Don't know if the .250 would be one of those.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Many years ago my dad sent one of his 99's back to Savage for some work. It was restocked at the time and a new lever installed. He has the old lever and the wood. Both sets of wood are serial numbered by Savage to the gun. Don't remember right now if it was the .22 Hi Power or his oct .30-30 this happened to.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  13. #13

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    I have my Dad's 99 in caliber .300 Savage and know that Dad used it on deer, antelope and fox and it had an old 4x Weaver scope on it. He pretty much retired it when he picked up his old Mod. 70 .264 Winchester that stands by the 99 Savage, I should kill something with it. I foolishly sold a 99 in .358 Winchester what is wrong with me?

    Here is a story my Dad told me and I believe it took place in November of 1969. His lifelong friend Ken also hunted with a 99 in .300 Savage. Back in the hey day of the Nelchina herd during the winter hunt they had split up and were looking for caribou when Dad and another friend heard 5 quick shots. A little bit later they were helping skin out the 5 caribou Ken had shot on a little frozen pond. Ken was hidden in the trees and said he just shot which ever one was closest to the trees. That ended their big winter caribou hunt since they had plenty of meat to go around.

    Ken used the original iron sights and shot many caribou and moose with his .300 Savage when he lived in Cantwell in the 50's.

    I have always found that little .300 Savage round interesting and wonder how it would do with a 21" barrel on a little light weight single shot or magazine fed bolt rifle.

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    The .300 Savage round is almost identical to the .308 with 150 grain bullets. It ain't no slouch.
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  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    I have always found that little .300 Savage round interesting and wonder how it would do with a 21" barrel on a little light weight single shot or magazine fed bolt rifle.
    Oughta be dandy.

    There were a whole lot of 300 Savages in my circle of friends before I moved to AK, and for them the 308 was generally considered "too loud and kicked too hard" in 99 Featherweights. There is certainly a difference between the two in recoil, but in my eyes it was kinda hair splitting.

    Most of the guys ended up using 165 grain Partitions in their 300's and 308's, as did I. To this day I still prefer that bullet in 308. A little flatter than 180's in the small capacity cases, while virtually as flat as 150's with a little more oomph in the landing zone. Get out past 200 yards and it's noticeably better than the 150.

    All that's a prelude to saying go for it on the single or bolt, but have a look at the 165's while you're at it. Bud of mine has a prized Remington 760 pump in 300 Savage (yeah, isn't that odd!). A previous owner had clipped the barrel to 20". Sure easy to carry and shoot, and he's whapped everything from deer to caribou, elk and moose with it. No one can talk him out of that great little gun, and no one can talk him into using anything else. As chief reloader for him, I've shot it quite a bit, and I'm impressed every time he gives me a turn.

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    My first deer season when I was 12 in WI, my dad and I camped with one of his buddies near the Michigan border and hunted the big woods near the Brule River. I was carrying dad's 20 ga. wingmaster, he is model 94 32 special, both fine guns for what we were doing but his buddy carried a model 99 in 300 savage with a low power scope. I was just glad to be finally hunting with the boys but looking at that Model 99 I had some serious gun envy, just a cool looking gun, and lever...a style of gun I love even more 30 years later. I never got to handle it, or even shoot it but that gun's lines really stuck with me. My dad owns four guns, then and now, and I knew that to ask for any kind of upgrade would get his patented logical answer that if you have a gun that will shoot deer, why would you need another. We hunted, had a great time, shot deer and swapped lies and stories for years that way with those guns. In late highschool I was in a shop getting some archery stuff and noticed a beat up model 99 in 308 for $170 bucks (another figure that sticks with me) I picked it up, and absolutely loved it. Being a left it was one of the best ways I could get into a higher pressure cartridge without ponying up for a left handed bolt and still have more than one shot. Alas, dad's words rang in my ears and I passed but I changed my mind two paychecks later and went back ready to sneak that gun into the house and dang if it wasn't gone. College came and went, early jobs without two nickels to rub together came and went and eventually I was up in AK out in Dillingham and picked up a LH 338 for moose etc. and that worked just great.

    I moved to Juneau 5 years ago and between not wanting to lug that 338 up and down mountains for deer, coupled with all of Mainer's stuff about model 99's along with Sayak's obvious fandom of the gun and Brownbear's posts as well, I grabbed a little windfall cash and started looking for one. I really wanted a 308 for bullet selection and ideally a featherweight.....however the modern price of these guns for something I would be lugging around the thick stuff, and near salt water and boats....just wasn't something I could justify. Finally I found a 1951 model 99 in 300 savage that was perfectly functional, if not a bit rough on the barrel finish but the bore was bright and the price was more than right. So, instead of sneaking that gun in my dad's house, I had to get it past my wife, luckily she never looks in the gun cabinet. Finally it arrived and I scrounged up the only box of shells I could find in town and took her to the range. I was amazed at how light the recoil was, how well it pointed and carried, only downside was the buckhorns were tough at 100 yards and the trigger required assistance from a bodybuilder. After some more thorough cleaning of the New Mexico sand that permeated the thing, I oiled her up and got ready for deer season in SE.

    My first trip out with it was early November in Admiralty, first two days were nice weather but noooo deer on our side of the inlet. So, I paddled my dinghy over to the other side to explore, despite a ridiculous cold that hit me and left me still hurtin after 12 hours in the sleeping bag. I hit the woods at the crack of 9 am, and immediately started seeing better sign and called in a few does. Bout 11 oclock I tooted on the call and heard em coming through the blueberries. I could see the doe, kind of, and knew there was something behind her. She busted me and started to snort, and I figured it was done, but then for some reason she decided that uphill was the way out, which took her through some open patches to offer a shot at her buddy,whatever they were. At this point I hadn't filled a tag and one of these deer was going home with me if I could help it. She quickly snuck up the hill and I got a round in the chamber using her cover noise, I put the sights up on a ten foot opening about 40 yards away and got settled......she stepped through and I waited for the follower. When he stepped into view I had to control the shakes as he was a gorgeous big heavy fork, 17 wide and all red antlers from rubbing alders. I struggled to focus on the shot instead of his head and placed the buckhorns on his chest and squeezed. This as usual in hunting took about 1.2 second but I can replay it in my head for minutes. Boom! and off he goes. He was only on a walk so I was sure I got a good hit in but it was so thick there was no follow up and the soft ground made things quiet. I gave it a few minutes then snuck over to where he was,.....good blood and a short trail later I was standing over a really nice blacktail buck....only two hours after hitting the woods. I had a gorgeous day to enjoy cutting him up and the snatches of sunshine that filtered through the canopy. Then I bucked him up in my pack and made a serious slog hiking back through all the steep and rough territory I had so easily snuck through that morning.

    It was a real treat to be able to take this guy in the thick stuff with that rifle, and was a near 30 year old vision that became a reality. I've since had that model 99 cerakoted in a nice deep blue and carried it all this fall and took three deer with it, now wearing a vintage Lyman peep site I found on gunbroker. (which lets me shoot 1.25 inches off the bench). I now have reloaded 165 grain Noslers for it as well and they shoot great. This will likely be my last rifle purchase for a loooong while (and my wife agrees ....) but I have so enjoyed the whole experience and this gun will likely go to moose, elk, and whatever camp in the future.

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    My dad had plenty of lever guns as he is a 'lefty'. 2 Savage 99's. A couple of Winchester 94's, and a model 71 .348, a model 95 in '30-06, and later on picked up a couple Winchester 100's for my older brothers, he said, but I think he was eyeing them himself. Had extractor problems with the 100's and after a couple of missed elk opportunities, they went away. The lever guns stayed. Dad then bought a Remington pump .30-06. my kid has that one now. I liked it enough that I bought a brand new one in .270 when I got married. Still have it and have literally taken hundreds of animals with it. Dad had a Winchester 62 pump .22 also. Poured cartons and cartons of ammo down the tube and still have it. Leftys aren't always fans of bolt actions, and dad never had many of those, but lots of stuff suitable for him.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Here's the deer and the gun before cerakote



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    And after the cerakote job.



  20. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    My first deer season when I was 12 in WI, my dad and I camped with one of his buddies near the Michigan border and hunted the big woods near the Brule River. I was carrying dad's 20 ga. wingmaster, he is model 94 32 special, both fine guns for what we were doing but his buddy carried a model 99 in 300 savage with a low power scope. I was just glad to be finally hunting with the boys but looking at that Model 99 I had some serious gun envy, just a cool looking gun, and lever...a style of gun I love even more 30 years later. I never got to handle it, or even shoot it but that gun's lines really stuck with me. My dad owns four guns, then and now, and I knew that to ask for any kind of upgrade would get his patented logical answer that if you have a gun that will shoot deer, why would you need another. We hunted, had a great time, shot deer and swapped lies and stories for years that way with those guns. In late highschool I was in a shop getting some archery stuff and noticed a beat up model 99 in 308 for $170 bucks (another figure that sticks with me) I picked it up, and absolutely loved it. Being a left it was one of the best ways I could get into a higher pressure cartridge without ponying up for a left handed bolt and still have more than one shot. Alas, dad's words rang in my ears and I passed but I changed my mind two paychecks later and went back ready to sneak that gun into the house and dang if it wasn't gone. College came and went, early jobs without two nickels to rub together came and went and eventually I was up in AK out in Dillingham and picked up a LH 338 for moose etc. and that worked just great.

    I moved to Juneau 5 years ago and between not wanting to lug that 338 up and down mountains for deer, coupled with all of Mainer's stuff about model 99's along with Sayak's obvious fandom of the gun and Brownbear's posts as well, I grabbed a little windfall cash and started looking for one. I really wanted a 308 for bullet selection and ideally a featherweight.....however the modern price of these guns for something I would be lugging around the thick stuff, and near salt water and boats....just wasn't something I could justify. Finally I found a 1951 model 99 in 300 savage that was perfectly functional, if not a bit rough on the barrel finish but the bore was bright and the price was more than right. So, instead of sneaking that gun in my dad's house, I had to get it past my wife, luckily she never looks in the gun cabinet. Finally it arrived and I scrounged up the only box of shells I could find in town and took her to the range. I was amazed at how light the recoil was, how well it pointed and carried, only downside was the buckhorns were tough at 100 yards and the trigger required assistance from a bodybuilder. After some more thorough cleaning of the New Mexico sand that permeated the thing, I oiled her up and got ready for deer season in SE.

    My first trip out with it was early November in Admiralty, first two days were nice weather but noooo deer on our side of the inlet. So, I paddled my dinghy over to the other side to explore, despite a ridiculous cold that hit me and left me still hurtin after 12 hours in the sleeping bag. I hit the woods at the crack of 9 am, and immediately started seeing better sign and called in a few does. Bout 11 oclock I tooted on the call and heard em coming through the blueberries. I could see the doe, kind of, and knew there was something behind her. She busted me and started to snort, and I figured it was done, but then for some reason she decided that uphill was the way out, which took her through some open patches to offer a shot at her buddy,whatever they were. At this point I hadn't filled a tag and one of these deer was going home with me if I could help it. She quickly snuck up the hill and I got a round in the chamber using her cover noise, I put the sights up on a ten foot opening about 40 yards away and got settled......she stepped through and I waited for the follower. When he stepped into view I had to control the shakes as he was a gorgeous big heavy fork, 17 wide and all red antlers from rubbing alders. I struggled to focus on the shot instead of his head and placed the buckhorns on his chest and squeezed. This as usual in hunting took about 1.2 second but I can replay it in my head for minutes. Boom! and off he goes. He was only on a walk so I was sure I got a good hit in but it was so thick there was no follow up and the soft ground made things quiet. I gave it a few minutes then snuck over to where he was,.....good blood and a short trail later I was standing over a really nice blacktail buck....only two hours after hitting the woods. I had a gorgeous day to enjoy cutting him up and the snatches of sunshine that filtered through the canopy. Then I bucked him up in my pack and made a serious slog hiking back through all the steep and rough territory I had so easily snuck through that morning.

    It was a real treat to be able to take this guy in the thick stuff with that rifle, and was a near 30 year old vision that became a reality. I've since had that model 99 cerakoted in a nice deep blue and carried it all this fall and took three deer with it, now wearing a vintage Lyman peep site I found on gunbroker. (which lets me shoot 1.25 inches off the bench). I now have reloaded 165 grain Noslers for it as well and they shoot great. This will likely be my last rifle purchase for a loooong while (and my wife agrees ....) but I have so enjoyed the whole experience and this gun will likely go to moose, elk, and whatever camp in the future.
    It's not hard to see your dad's practical wisdom. I fully understand his 4 gun theory. I have way to many guns again and many of them are good enough but none of them are perfect. Lately I have been thinking that I should get rid of most of what I have and throw caution to the wind and buy a handful of dream rifles. The ones that I have always wanted but they were just too nice to be practical. For instance I just bought a very, very nice by my standards model 94 NRA 30-30 that is beyond my normal standard. I have always loved the 24 inch 94/30-30 with the short magazine tube. I bet I had handled them at gun shows dozens of times and thought man one day. That day never ever came. I always tried to settle for less at a much lower price with the idea that when the new wears off and I am bored with it I can come close to breaking even. However I am at the point in my life where I am thinking its's now or never. The clock is ticking. I worked a 30 year career at one job and averaged 58 hrs/week over the 30 years. Now I am 8 years into my second career job. I don't belong to the Country Club, don't tail gate at football games, don't drive a new truck etc. My thing is guns. I love everything about them. Beyond the Spiritual realm they define who I am. So why is it that I have always made a compromise when it came to buying guns. The NRA commemorative was outside of the norm for me. It was indulgence and overboard......... but dang guys, I am looking forward to getting that gun with a zest that I haven't felt since I was a kid.
    I have also always thought that the Savage 99 was the lever gun of the elite. It set a standard a few levels above even the spiffy 94 that I just bought. Not that one can't feel real darned good sitting back against a tree with that slender 94 laying across your lap ......that's exactly what I am picturing. However the 99 affords one the power of a bolt gun in a lever gun and I want one. I took 5 guns out to the local gun shop a little while ago and said sell these. They were nothing special and ones that I hadn't even thought about in a while. There was an 870 20 ga with a slug barrel, an older mini 14(a prior to ranch rifle model), a Zastava 98 Mauser in 243, a Ruger Charger and a Sig Mosquito that should have been thrown in a hole and covered with dirt a long time ago. I gave my low dollar on each and they will sell at the set prices. Now my quest for dream rifle number two.....and it will be a 99. I have never had many forever guns but rather just shot the trading stock guns that came trough my hands. That changes now.

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