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Thread: Raw out of the river

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    Default Raw out of the river

    Is it decently safe to take a salmon out of the river, and just bite into it? I saw that guy on Man Vs. Wild do it so i was curious if i do it to get a laugh outta the people in my boat if it is safe.

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    Member AKBighorn's Avatar
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    LMAO, they eat alot worse than that on Fear Factor. Personally I wouldn't do it but I really don't see why it would hurt you. Aside from humans everything else that eats fish eat it raw

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    Thumbs down don't do it...

    once fish are in fresh water they are far more prone to cattying bacteria and parasites...everything else may eat fish raw, but i bet they all test positive for giardia and tapeworms, too.
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    Dave may have a point there.

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    I agree but if I ever had the urge to do it I would not be to overly concerned about it. Id rather eat raw salmon out of the Kenai or russian over the food served at some of the places in anchorage
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    Default man vs wild

    I saw that episode twice; I love watching Bear. Just remember that what he shows you is *survival mode*. If you have the opportunity to cook your meats, do so for safety reasons; there is always the possibility of parasites in raw meat.

    I watched "Survivorman" for a few episodes until I figured out this bozo isn't going to show me anything; he's just struggling to get by until the end of his lame show. Bear (host of Man Vs. Wild) would kill him and eat him, LOL.

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    You ever wonder how often that guy gets worms, parasites, bacteria, and other junk? He does, eats and drinks stuff that I would never do. Unless like you said it was "survival mode" .

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    Post There are some roundworm parasites...

    From the New York Times: "When raw, most saltwater fish that are eaten can be carriers of anisakis simplex, a parasitic roundworm that may invade the gastrointestinal tract of humans, causing mild to serious complications."

    Anisakis is very common in Alaska salmon. Cooking kills it, freezing kills it. I don't know about pickling...

    Online info suggests Anisakis is not the worst parasite to get. The NYT article says mild cases give you diarrhea, while severe cases involve a worm getting out of the intestines into the gut, leading to granuloma. No fun, probably not lethal.

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    Default Nuther episode

    I just saw another episode last night; Bear was in the outback of northern Austrailia. 130 degrees F., a water bottle, a knife and a flint. Remember, this is *survival* training - not anything but. He pee'd in his water bottle and drank it. Yeah, he said it was warm, salty and bad but he drank it. I knew from my college days (med tech) that urine "straight from the spout" is sterile (or else you'd have an infection) but Bear said the main thing is to drink it very soon afterwards because it breeds bacteria quickly. I guess 99 degree pee is a lot more tolerable than 130 degree (ambient air temp) any day. If you get a chance, watch his shows; it could definately save your life. He's not "Survivorman"; he couldn't find his way out of a phone booth and Bear would kill and eat that moron. He parachuted out of a plane and landed somewhere high on a glacier down on the Kenai in one of the episodes. I think it was one of the easiest episodes except for when his boat sank. There was brash ice all over the place and he was about 30 yards from shore. One of the things I like about him is that he doesn't just tell you what to do, he demonstrates it. If he tells you that a certain spider is edible, he eats it - right in front of the camera.

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    I don't want to side track this thread but will post our previous discussions of both survival shows.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...light=survivor

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    Don't eat raw salmon. You can get worms, or worse, the nematode, Anisakis simplex. I went dipnetting this past week and brought home 30. I found worms in many of them.

    Here are some links. The first two deal with the fish tapeworm:

    wikipedia entry: Diphyllobothrium

    State of Alaska epidemiology bulletin on Fish Tapeworm in Raw Alaskan Salmon

    And a link about the nematode, Anisakis simplex.

    Once a live larva is ingested, it proceeds to attach itself, in the great majority of cases, to the stomach wall. This attachment in turn causes a strong allergic reaction that at first may appear to be an allergic reaction to a food. If the worm perforates the stomach wall and enters the peritoneal cavity, symptoms may suggest acute appendicitis or a gastric ulcer. Since humans are not the definitive host species for this worm, the luckiest patients simply cough up the inch-and-a-half-long creature. For most others, fiber-optic endoscopy will allow the physician to spot the worm and remove it with the endoscope's grappling tool. For maybe 10 percent or so of victims, those who have the nematode set up house in their small intestine, only a surgical resectioning of the infested portion of the bowel will rid them of the creature. Unlike the case with mankind's ancient freeloading friend the tapeworm, to date there are no drugs that can effectively kill anisakid worms.
    Nice.

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    Here's another link about Anisakiasis:

    ANISAKIASIS FROM RED SALMON

    On July 12, 1982 a dramatic outbreak of Anisakiasis occurred in six people who ate salmon steaks from a red salmon caught in Chitna. The fish had been caught the day before and kept in a refrigerator overnight, but was not frozen. It was baked at 350 for less than one-half hour. Those eating recalled that the fish, particularly along the spine, appeared to be raw. Four of the six persons who ate the fish developed severe stomach pains and, within one hour after eating the meal, vomited viable worms about 2 centimeters in length. One of the individuals, a 26-year-old male, developed severe stomach pain, nausea, continued vomiting, and weakness which lasted for three days. The other individuals experienced stomach pains and cramps for several hours after the meal but then recovered without complication.

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    Member WaterWolf's Avatar
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    Whats funnier is the guy spends 30 minutes making a two pronged spear, and then chases fish around for 30 more minutes...........


    ........when we all know ya just get them in the shallows and kick'em out of the water.

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    Member RainGull's Avatar
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    My innerd doctor sees lot's of raw fish eaters!
    Science has a rich history of proving itself wrong.

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    Default Mmmm!!!! Sushi!!!!

    gurggle gurggle gurggle!!!

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    Hmm...I wish I had read this thread before I just consumed a bunch of homemade lox this morning...

    Will curing with salt overnight in the refridgerator help? I'm hoping I'm not in for a bad day :-).

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sketch View Post
    Don't eat raw salmon. You can get worms, or worse, the nematode, Anisakis simplex. I went dipnetting this past week and brought home 30. I found worms in many of them.

    Here are some links. The first two deal with the fish tapeworm:

    wikipedia entry: Diphyllobothrium

    State of Alaska epidemiology bulletin on Fish Tapeworm in Raw Alaskan Salmon

    And a link about the nematode, Anisakis simplex.



    Nice.
    I shot a bear opening day earlier this month that infested with tapeworms. He had a pink in his mouth when I shot him. I've heard about salmon being a fish that can give you bacterial infections easier than some other fish when eaten raw.

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    Thank you, I'm cured...
    Pete

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    I probably turn a third of the kings i keep each year into sushi...but I always freeze it first. Eating them raw without freezing (especially sockeye and char out here) will certainly expose you to large amounts of visible worms. That said, I've done char and sockeye as sushi and both are pretty good but they were frozen and trimmed and inspected before using. Kings have parasites as well but they don't seem to be quite as rampant.

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    Default Salmon head cartilage

    I have seen village people take a salmon usually a coho cut off the upper part of the fish's snout at the base, peel the skin off, wash the piece (cartilage) in the river and eat it. You can hear the crunch. Never seen anyone eat raw salmon flesh right out of the river though, just the cartilage in the snout. Wouldn't know if the cartilage would carry any parasites due to it density, any ideas ?

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