Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 34

Thread: Boots: Hunting vs Hiking

  1. #1
    Member Leryt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    North Pole, AK (Fairbanks)
    Posts
    120

    Default Boots: Hunting vs Hiking

    Looking to get a new pair of non rubber hunting boots. I've seen where a lot of people are going away from hunting/mountaineering boots to hiking boots. Perfect example is the Lowa GTX Renegade. I was looking at these at a local store.
    I hunt SE Alaska, the Juneau area, but am looking to go on a Caribou hunt in Adak and next year I'm planning on going down to Etolin Island to get a Elk. So I need a good boot for hiking the alpine and hills, but not necessarily a boot for Mt Goat and Dall Sheep hunting.
    What are your thoughts on the Lowa Renegade? Is the hiking boot a good option for hunting? What about carrying out a quartered out Caribou/Elk/Moose? Thanks guys!

  2. #2
    Member AKducks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    485

    Default

    what's wrong with extra tuffs? who needs ankles anyway . I think you want something waterproof and with high ankles to deal with creek crossings and what not (I'm from Juneau originally and honestly did 95% of my hunts in extra tuffs).

    I would not want those Renegades for southeast or well any hunt really, any kind of bog and you will get wet, well its southeast, you go into the woods and you get wet!

  3. #3
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Willow, AK
    Posts
    3,360

    Default

    look at wader options. simms guide pants, or another companies' pants, paired with quality simms, korker, patagonia, et al wading shoes are great options for tundra and low alpine hunts. Simms goretex are very breathable with great feet. Both areas you mention, adak and SE, have more days with rain, fog, mist than without. The breathable pant lets you sit without getting a wet bum. the boots handle hiking very well, and are made to remain wet for days on end.

  4. #4

    Default

    I have spent more time moose and caribou hunting then any thing else and most all of that was done in LL Bean Shoe Pacs, the old rubber bottom Vibram soled ones which they no longer make, so now I use the same pac boot with the "chain tread" sole. As I have aged I need more ankle support so I ordered a pair of Lowa Tibet GTX WXL boots to replace my worn out Cabela's leather boots. I think the Renegades you mention will be at their best for hiking with out a heavy pack. Some guys are just tough and can hunt high country and low lands in an all rubber boot, I'm not that guy.

    If they ever make them in a wide size I will order a pair of Schnee's pac boots for my moose and caribou hunts. They should work ok for deer too.
    I do think one should use the lightest boot they can get by with if it is durable and comfortable with good ankle support. Binoculars and boots are two areas I like having the best I can afford.

  5. #5
    Member Leryt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    North Pole, AK (Fairbanks)
    Posts
    120

    Default

    AKducks, well I have gone through 3-4 pairs of XtraTufs in a 2 year period since they moved to China so I stopped buying them. I've heard recently that their quality has returned a little bit, but still not 100% up to what they were. I have a pair of rubber boots I hunt in, Muck Wetlands, that I am already replacing with Bogs Classic or one of the other Muck Boots. Willphish4food, that's a good idea for the local stuff here in Juneau, but I'm thinking hiking up into the alpine, you think these will work for that too?
    So these were a non rubber boot option, something for when I'm hiking the high alpines where I won't be stepping in the bogs. I've seen a lot of guys switch to hiking boots for hunting, like the Renegades, but haven't done it myself. My old work boots were the Keen Pittsburghs and they weren't terrible to hike in but I'm looking for something without the steel toe and was thinking about trying out a hiking boot vs the stiffer hunting/pac boots. The small local store has the Lowa Renegades, Vasque Breeze, some Oboz, Keen Targhee II for hikers and the Danner Pronghorns and Danner East Ridge for hunting boots. That's about it for local shoes I can try on.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    Southcentral Alaska
    Posts
    567

    Default

    For what it's worth, I've always found mountain boots to be too stiff and too heavy for long hunts. I wear Asolo TP535s and love them. They don't last as long as other boots, but I still manage to get ~100 days in the field out of one pair of boots, and after I wear them out they still work well for the next couple years as my backwoods and work boot. I would like to spend a little bit more money for a more durable boot, but I've never found a more durable boot that is as comfortable on a 20 mile hike.

    I read about some of you guys carrying 150 lb packs down sheep country ridges, and perhaps you need more boot than I need. But, I can carry 110 pounds on my TP535s for 12 miles, and it's not my feet or ankles that hurt the worst.

  7. #7
    Member AKducks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    485

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Leryt View Post
    AKducks, well I have gone through 3-4 pairs of XtraTufs in a 2 year period since they moved to China so I stopped buying them. I've heard recently that their quality has returned a little bit, but still not 100% up to what they were. I have a pair of rubber boots I hunt in, Muck Wetlands, that I am already replacing with Bogs Classic or one of the other Muck Boots. Willphish4food, that's a good idea for the local stuff here in Juneau, but I'm thinking hiking up into the alpine, you think these will work for that too?
    So these were a non rubber boot option, something for when I'm hiking the high alpines where I won't be stepping in the bogs. I've seen a lot of guys switch to hiking boots for hunting, like the Renegades, but haven't done it myself. My old work boots were the Keen Pittsburghs and they weren't terrible to hike in but I'm looking for something without the steel toe and was thinking about trying out a hiking boot vs the stiffer hunting/pac boots. The small local store has the Lowa Renegades, Vasque Breeze, some Oboz, Keen Targhee II for hikers and the Danner Pronghorns and Danner East Ridge for hunting boots. That's about it for local shoes I can try on.
    I understand about the Tuffs, I'm still on my made in America ones. I have some Kendrick mountain extremes that I bought for a goat hunt, they work well for steep slopes and the tussucks up here in Fairbanks. they are waterproof enough to handle a step in the creek or a quick walk in the bogs around Fairbanks.

    I think the pronghorns would be great for alpine deer IMO or any hunt really.

    ok the simplfy:

    Deer (Sept-December): Rubber boots
    Deer (alpine): Danner Pronghorns
    ADAK Island: Danner Pronghorns (or rubbers I've never been there pics make it look really wet)
    Etlon Island ElK: Pronghorns (I would bring rubbers along as well its super wet down there and you might be better off trading off boots everyother day)
    Moose: rubbers
    Goat/Sheep: Pronghorns
    Bear: rubbers/Waders (need to bring waders if hunting any kind of salt flat)

    hope that helps, I think you would be happy with Danner Pronghorns.

  8. #8
    Member Leryt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    North Pole, AK (Fairbanks)
    Posts
    120

    Default

    HikerDan, yeah I don't think I need a set of the mountain boots, like you are saying. That's why I was looking for something a little stiffer then a hiking boot, but not a Schnee or Kenetrek mountain boot. I figure I'll probably wear those shoes to work everyday and then I'll hit the hills with them in hunting season. I'm mid 200#'s (slowly moving back to low 200s) but I figure most of my trips I will just have a day pack on the frame and wont have a lot of weight unless I'm lucky with the Caribou or Moose this year, and an Elk next season. Then I'll be looking at a decent pack. I'm looking at the Danner East Ridges because they are recraftable and for the money I'd like to have them last a little longer. They are also supposed to be a little more solid then the Pronghorns.

    AKducks, I really liked my first pair of Tufs but after that they just kinda went to crap. So I'm looking at Bogs, Mucks and Lacrosse. I already had/have a thread on here about those though, lol. I might try out the XtraTufs again just because I've heard some more positive things lately. I like your list, that is pretty much exactly what I was thinking.
    August-September Alpine Deer: Leather Boot
    September-December Deer: Rubber Boot
    Adak: Take both, looks like it could need either one.
    Etolin: Wear Leather but take rubber boots, especially since hunt is October/November.
    Moose: Rubber boots, maybe waders.
    Goat/Sheep: Leather boots (no plans for this soon)
    Bear: rubber boots or waders.

    I've been looking a lot into the East Ridges and they look like really good boots that just need better arch support. Buy good aftermarket insoles and I may be set. I'll be going to the store tomorrow to try some boots on and see what I think: Pronghorns and East Ridges.
    Thanks Guys! Keep the conversation going!

  9. #9
    Member AKducks's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    485

    Default

    my feet pronate pretty bad (ruin normal shoes within 2-3 months even hiking boots) got a pair of insoles and the problem was gone! There are lots of good leather boots out there try them on and find what fits you best (I have wide feet narrowed my selection down quite a bit)

    I really like hip boots as well but if you have to walk more then a 1/2 mile then I would stick with rubber boots. but hip boots are great for the boat!

  10. #10
    Member Leryt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    North Pole, AK (Fairbanks)
    Posts
    120

    Default

    interesting, I'm slight supinated I believe. I know for a fact I run on the outside of my foot. I think since I've gotten heavier I've gotten better about being more flat, or normal, footed. In the past though I have always worn the outter edge of my shoes out first.

  11. #11

    Default

    There is a site called Lathrop & Sons and after looking it over I think they may have taken foot wear and the individual fitting of foot wear to another level.

    One of the items they feature is a inner sole called Synergy that they can fit or the customer can fit to an individual boot style. I'm still wrapping my head around their information. It is an interesting read and I encourage prospective boot buyers to check it out.

    After my new Lowa Tibet GTX WXL boots show up I will see how much room my big foot has in them. If room permits I will order a set of the Synergy inner soles as not all inner soles are created equal!

  12. #12

    Default

    Unless things have changed I have never found any Gortex, Dry Plus, etc. type of membrane lined leather boot to be water proof. That goes for rain gear too. The only thing I ever found to be water proof was made out of rubber, which can get damp inside from our bodies natural warmth.

    The LL Bean and similar quality rubber bottom shoe pacs are next in line for being "water resistant" if the seams and leather are treated well with SnoSeal or a similar product. Last is a leather boot with some kind of alleged "water proof" membrane.

    I am eventually going to buy another lighter weight hiker then the Lowa Tibet's I have coming and it will probably be made by Meindl as I have a pair of their shoes and they are the most comfortable piece of foot wear I have ever worn. A few hiking/hunting models are available from Cabelas and as usual it is hard to beat a Cabelas warranty.

  13. #13
    Member Leryt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    North Pole, AK (Fairbanks)
    Posts
    120

    Default

    .338 mag. Yeah I figured that whatever leather boot I get I will Sno-Seal or Obenauf it over the GoreTex. I'm looking for a boot that will mainly be good for at most walking through grass and maybe crossing a small stream. Not any kind of sustained wetness outside the grass. 2 years ago when I hunted the alpine here even going off the trail we never got in any really wet or tall stuff once we got up high, which is mainly what I want to use these for. But I agree, and I'm looking for something that I can hike in with a quarter of a caribou, elk or moose so sounds like I might need/want something a little more then the Renegade.
    I'll look into Lathrop and Sons about those insoles, that sounds really awesome. I think something like that would make those Danner East Ridge boots work good.

  14. #14
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Willow, AK
    Posts
    3,360

    Default

    The wader pant option works fine in Alpine. You can carry a pair of neoprene socks to wear if you want to leave your waders off. With the waders on its just like hunting with full time rainpants. I put a lightweight fleece pant over the waders this year to tone the noise down.

  15. #15
    Member Leryt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    North Pole, AK (Fairbanks)
    Posts
    120

    Default

    So I started looking at numbers, and it looks like none of the "mountains" here go above 5000'. Admiralty Island has a point either 4650' or 4850' but everything is 4200' or less. Douglas island and the mainland are 3500' and down, Adak where I'll be Caribou is 3924', and if I get to go for Elk next season Etolin Island is 3860'. So nothing to extreme as far as elevations, and I don't see myself going on anything higher than this stuff in the next 3 years so the boots need to be good only to 5000', and good for the caribou and elk. I also realized the moose I'll most likely be wearing my rubber boots for anyway. whilphish, I'm looking into it, I don't think I would like that, but definitely not throwing out any idea. the felt pant over makes 100% sense to me if your hiking and trying to be quiet.

  16. #16
    Member c6 batmobile's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Location
    Interior
    Posts
    2,101

    Default

    Plus one to .338's advice on the miendel. Just picked a pair up last year and they have been super super comfy for everything from walking on a packed trail to hiking mountains and snow. I treated mine with sno-seal and they shed water great on quick creek jumps and light bog activity especially when paired with a gaiter. When I wear these things out through the sole Im getting another pair.

    On the rubber option I just picked up a pair of lacrosse aeroheads and man are they comfy too. I've had mucks in the past and they were awesome but these things put them to shame so far.
    Makin fur fins and feathers fly.

  17. #17
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,748

    Default

    I've been a Miendel boot man myself for a number of years. I hunted everything in them in all the different types of terrain. But if you are looking for a little lighter boot but still very heavy duty, this is an excellent boot for a great price... http://www.sierratradingpost.com/aso...colorFamily=01
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  18. #18
    Member Leryt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Location
    North Pole, AK (Fairbanks)
    Posts
    120

    Default

    Are these the Cabela's Meindls? I've been lookin at them, The Prefekt, Light Hunter and Western Slope. But haven't made my decision yet. Or did you not get the Cabela's Meindls?

  19. #19
    Member jdb3's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Petersburg, Alaska
    Posts
    466

    Default

    My hunting partners and I started wearing Schnee's boots almost 20 years ago. I also wore them while working in the woods here in Southeast with wonderful results. We have hunted everything from caribou and moose to sheep in them without any problems. Carry an extra pair of liners or two and you can go for a long time. The only time my feet have gotten wet is when I went over the tops! Nice thing about them is you can have the resoled when the old ones wear out for a nominal cost.

  20. #20
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Kenai Peninsula, Alaska
    Posts
    9,748

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Leryt View Post
    Are these the Cabela's Meindls? I've been lookin at them, The Prefekt, Light Hunter and Western Slope. But haven't made my decision yet. Or did you not get the Cabela's Meindls?
    Yes, the Cabela's Meindels. But I don't know if I'll ever buy them again after owning the Kenetrek and now the Asolo...
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •