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Thread: Ground school options?

  1. #1
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Default Ground school options?

    My wife is getting pretty serious about getting her pilot's license, and while we're aware that there are self-study options, she'd rather have a traditional in-person class for her ground school. I did mine through UAA, but that was 17 years ago and I have no clue as to the other options. Advice?

  2. #2
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    Since you're so close, I would opt for UAA. Otherwise Arctic Flyers gs at Lake Hood is awesome. I've heard good things about Wingnuts at Wolf Lake and Artic (now Fly Around Alaska?) in Palmer.

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    Arctic flyers is great! Rick has classes set up for multiple students and they share the cost of his hourly rate. He lowers his rate if you don't like Obama! Just kidding! (Maybe)

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    Rick's classes were pretty good (I did only a few--long story) and reasonably priced (payable upon completion). I don't know if he changed how he decides what block of instruction to teach but it was a group decision the ones I went to. And the group was made up of students in various stages of training, each coming to the Saturday and Sunday 10 to 2 classes as they could, each needing different blocks of instruction. The informal atmosphere was great, but I could see students having to sit through something already completed by the tyranny of the majority. It's worth a shot and unless it's changed there's no commitment--like I said, it's pay as you go. Even if she doesn't stick it out, the time won't be wasted as she most likely will learn something she wouldn't have otherwise at another school.

  5. #5
    Member AlpineEarl's Avatar
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    I second Arctic Flyers. He also suggested King schools online stuff. You can do both, study and use the online stuff at home and go to the in-person stuff for reinforcement. If you have any experience with navigation, some of the stuff is redundant so you can skip that portion of in-person ground school and save a little money.

  6. #6

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    I haglve the books an the materials for ground school i can give you

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  7. #7

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    I never spent a minute in ground school and got a 97% on the written. And frankly I was upset, I really thought I aced it.
    I had bought the Jeppesen written exam study package from the then take flight FBO. Over $200. but well worth it. several books including the usually included large book covering everything from weather to airports, but also some smaller ones detailing exactly how to perform the maneuvers required on a check ride.
    Most important a booklet with all 700 questions you may encounter on the written, and the charts needed to solve the navigation probloms.

    I took a Monday off from work, and from Friday night till Tuesday morning Did nothing but study, eat and sleep. And very little of the last two.

  8. #8
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    Ground school should be about much more than passing the written. Those things are so antiquated, easy and honestly stupid. If the ground school is only about the written, then ya skip it.

    Quote Originally Posted by jim in anchorage View Post
    I never spent a minute in ground school and got a 97% on the written. And frankly I was upset, I really thought I aced it.
    I had bought the Jeppesen written exam study package from the then take flight FBO. Over $200. but well worth it. several books including the usually included large book covering everything from weather to airports, but also some smaller ones detailing exactly how to perform the maneuvers required on a check ride.
    Most important a booklet with all 700 questions you may encounter on the written, and the charts needed to solve the navigation probloms.

    I took a Monday off from work, and from Friday night till Tuesday morning Did nothing but study, eat and sleep. And very little of the last two.

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