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Thread: Fishing Reserection Bay from Shore

  1. #1

    Default Fishing Reserection Bay from Shore

    I will be fishing from shore around Millers Landing in May and June. Anyone have any tips or tricks to use in that area?
    Tight Lines-

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    go to he head of the bay an try for REDS , they should be running then [ snagging ] for the most part, SID

  3. #3

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    By June, the blackcod (sablefish) will certainly be that far in. They are mostly sub-adults, not nearly as big as the ones caught in the commercial fisheries further off shore, but they are aggressive, hungry, and will hit just about anything; cast chunks of herring. I have seen people keep enough to try and make a meal out of them, never tried retaining them myself. There are also flounder and sole in the area.

    There is a run of hatchery kings that return to the area (destined for the lagoon) that begin running in May; I have witnessed them intercepted at Lowell pt, but it is a long shot.

    If you are restricted to Miller's Landing, you could try the low-tide hike to the mouth of Tonsina Creek (or any other Seward Creek for that matter) and swing some smolt patterns or cast spinners for dollies; this is more of fishery that needs to be well timed and plan your trip well since the hike is tide dependent.

    But I do agree with SID, the most popular and productive fishery during May/June in Seward is the Resurrection Red run (read regs)

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    When u walk onto the beach from the road, look to your right down the beach. There is a big rock just offshore (25 yards?) where the more rockier shoreline starts. Walk 2/3 to 3/4 the way down the beach to where the rocks start. Throw out a chunk of herring and sinker, like fishing halibut. Let it soak. I've seen very nice size dollies caught like that along w sole, butts, or cod.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

  5. #5
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_DFish View Post
    By June, the blackcod (sablefish) will certainly be that far in. They are mostly sub-adults, not nearly as big as the ones caught in the commercial fisheries further off shore, but they are aggressive, hungry, and will hit just about anything; cast chunks of herring. I have seen people keep enough to try and make a meal out of them, never tried retaining them myself. There are also flounder and sole in the area.

    There is a run of hatchery kings that return to the area (destined for the lagoon) that begin running in May; I have witnessed them intercepted at Lowell pt, but it is a long shot.

    If you are restricted to Miller's Landing, you could try the low-tide hike to the mouth of Tonsina Creek (or any other Seward Creek for that matter) and swing some smolt patterns or cast spinners for dollies; this is more of fishery that needs to be well timed and plan your trip well since the hike is tide dependent.

    But I do agree with SID, the most popular and productive fishery during May/June in Seward is the Resurrection Red run (read regs)
    I kept a handful of the immature black cod out of resurrection bay last year and found them to very very mushy. I won't be killing any more.

  6. #6
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    I kept a handful of the immature black cod out of resurrection bay last year and found them to very very mushy. I won't be killing any more.
    Yeah, we kept our first juvenile ones last year as well and were similarly unimpressed. Definitely not anything like the older, larger ones from the depths.

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    Yeah, we kept our first juvenile ones last year as well and were similarly unimpressed. Definitely not anything like the older, larger ones from the depths.
    Hmmm....I kept a bunch and they were awesome. I Filleted them out, soaked in a teriyaki style marinade and baked them. They are relatively soft, but all black cod are relatively speaking....definitely edible.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kardinal_84 View Post
    Hmmm....I kept a bunch and they were awesome. I Filleted them out, soaked in a teriyaki style marinade and baked them. They are relatively soft, but all black cod are relatively speaking....definitely edible.
    Don't get me wrong - they weren't bad, just not nearly as rich and flavorful as the adults. I'm assuming the younger ones have a different diet, so maybe this is the reason for the different flavor/oil content?

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    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    My thoughts, my son's thoughts, and my wife's thoughts were that they sucked in comparison to the freezer full of rockfish and halibut we have.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    My thoughts, my son's thoughts, and my wife's thoughts were that they sucked in comparison to the freezer full of rockfish and halibut we have.
    I think its just a matter of taste. They tasted like black cod, but as pointed out, not quite as rich. Also we kept most of ours from Kachemak Bay if that makes any difference. The dozen or so Japanese guests I served it too pretty much emptied the dish in minutes. Our family finds halibut and rockfish to be very bland. We substitute rockfish and halibut for basically chicken breast.

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