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Thread: 200 grain .308 Barnes XTS

  1. #1

    Default 200 grain .308 Barnes XTS

    I have a Pre-64 Mod. 70 Featherweight 30-06 being semi-customized and it will be done soon. I am ordering a Brockman's pop up receiver sight for it and when it is not wearing the scope I will stuff 5 of those 200 grain Barnes XTS flat based bullets in it. I contacted Barnes Bullets and they said the bullet was built with a 1-10 twist rate in mind so I should be just fine.

    I will start with WW cases and H4350sc. I am hoping to get some where between 2,550 and 2,600 fps mv out of the 22" barrel. This will be my super duper big beast killing ought six load! I used to use the 200 grain Nosler Partition and had good moose and caribou results.

    Do any of you have any experience making gut piles with that 200 grain .308 bullet? If so I would appreciate hearing about it. I am familiar with the 180 grain .308 bullet, so this should give good results up to 200 yards, which is about my reliable max limit with a receiver sight.

  2. #2

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    No experience with .308 tsx bullets, but my understanding is the tsx's perform best with high velocity. They out-penetrate comparable lead controlled expansion bullets. I have a feeling those 200's were meant for super ultra magnum 300's. Not sure if you'd be getting any improvement over a 180 gr.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    I am hoping to get some where between 2,550 and 2,600 fps mv out of the 22" barrel.
    How much powder capacity are you going to lose to that loooooooong bullet? Dunno the bullet, but I do know that the range of powders that can give you that kind of velocity from a 200 is pretty small.... And likely cut back too much with a whole bunch of bullet hanging its butt down below the neck. Let us know what you achieve, but watch those pressures. Kinda gives me a creepy feeling up the back of the neck to think about trying to substitute that longer bullet into a recipe intended for a lead bullet.

  4. #4
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Kinda gives me a creepy feeling up the back of the neck to think about trying to substitute that longer bullet into a recipe intended for a lead bullet.
    The bearing surface on a 200gr copper bullet is going to be considerable....much more than an equivalent lead bullet. I'd work up slowly.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  5. #5

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    I may be hoping for the unreachable. I have not loaded any 200 grain Partitions for my 30-06 in many years, since we went to the 180 grain Barnes X. So I will have to see how it goes with a 200 grain X bullet. I need to dust off my old chronograph. If I was smart I would just see how good the 168 grain Triple Shock Boat Tail shoots and live with it if it groups well.

  6. #6

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    It's probably gonna be a stretch to get the numbers you want but give it a go. You probably will have to use a different powder. And if you have any extra room in the mag seat those bullets long to give yourself some extra case capacity. If you are an experienced reloader don't be afraid to go over book if you can seat long. Look for articles about Audette's Ladder Test. If you don't achieve your desired number I wouldn't be upset, no critter will complain.

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    I shoot 200 Barns out of my 300 win mag and pushing them at 2750fps not sure you have the room for the power you want to use in 30-06. Not sure what other power you might use. If you just want a big punch you should try some 220 grain round nose, and work up a load.

  8. #8
    Member 2dawgs's Avatar
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    I used to shoot those Ol 220 round nose core lokt's outa my 06 when I was a lad. Lotsa killing power there, took a fair share
    of moose with em and a nice yellow bear.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    If it were me, I'd get some RL-15 and be happy with something like 2250-2300 fps, which is gonna be more realistic.
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  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by hodgeman View Post
    The bearing surface on a 200gr copper bullet is going to be considerable....much more than an equivalent lead bullet. I'd work up slowly.
    Supposedly, the grooves in the bullet cancel out what would be greater bearing surface. I have also heard (sorry for the second hand info) that given the same bullet weight and charges, tsx's are coming out slightly faster than traditional lead bullets; leading to some to theorize there's less overall friction with the all copper bullet. Who knows if there's any truth to that though. But I wouldn't be surprised if you could achieve at least as much velocity with a 200 grain tsx as with a 200 grain lead bullet.

    I would read up on Barnes' recommendation on seating depth. I think they encourage seating out very close to the lands.

    Again though, I would be more concerned with the bullet to expand well enough even at your goal velocity (and reduced more at range) to out perform your trusted 180 X's.

    Found some reviews here: http://www.midwayusa.com/product/637...free-box-of-50

  11. #11
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    Some people seem to think the larger the number, the better the bullet.

    I suscribe to the theory that both the heaviest and lightest bullets in a caliber are best avoided and I prefer to shot only bullets in the lower 1/3 of the range.
    This gives good velocities which mean flat shooting and proper expansion of the bullets.

    If I have a need to go to heavier bullets I move to a larger caliber so I can stay in the bottom third.

    Example: 30-06 bullet range about 90 grains to 220 grains.
    I would shoot 125 to185 grain bullets and expect good performance.

    But if I'm going for big moose or brown bears and would prefer the 220 grains, I would go with the 338 win mag and shoot 225 grain bullets from the range of 200-300.

    This thinking has served me well for many years.

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    In addition to all of the prior comments/suggestions I would add that you might want to consider a Ackley Improver '06 along with a Wyatt's extended magazine to try and maximize your case powder capacity. I would also not rule out the 180's. Good Luck.
    "Actions speak louder than words - 'nough said"

  13. #13

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    Prior to the release of the Barnes X bullet in the mid 80's we used the 200 grain Nosler Partition with good results. We then went to the 180 grain X bullet and have had good results. The 200 grain Triple Shock bullet should be a good 30-06 load for up to 200 yard shots on big bear and moose.

  14. #14
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    The Barnes copper hunting bullets data seem to be a bit slower than comparable weight lead core counterparts. But, they retain all their weight, so don't need as much velocity. You can be happy with a Basrnes bullet of less weight because it will perform as well or better than comparable bullets that are heavier and it will be going as fast or faster.

    In other words, the 180g TSX would probably penetrate like a 200/220g partition and would out penetrate most all cup and core bullets. The tipped bullets increase the BC quite a bit. That makes no difference to you at your 200 yard maximum. So, shoot what shoots the best in your gun. No moose or bear will survive a hit from a properly placed premium bullet.

    I tried some of the 200g TTSX long range Jobbies. They gave me really awful groups, like 6 inches at 100 yards. The BC for the 200g TSX was not acceptable for me. The 168g TTSX shot just under an inch. So, when I want a monolithic bullet, I use it and am confident it will out perform a 180g lead premium bullet.

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