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Thread: Trying to figure out if I should keep my electric reel setup.

  1. #1

    Default Trying to figure out if I should keep my electric reel setup.

    I have a Miya Epoch 500 electric reel with a heavy duty rod and boat mount that I use for deep sea fishing. 300m of water, 4~5 hooks, I get to pull 50 pounds worth of cod at the push of a button. Not really sport but I really like cod, fresh and salted. I'll be moving to Anchorage this summer and I'm being told that under a sport or personal use fishing license that you are limited to the number of hooks you can use.

    My question is; should I keep this setup or cash it in so I can free the money for other toys? I only use the electric setup as the most efficient way to get Costco amounts of fish. Between the limit on the number of hooks and possession limits, it sounds like a big electric reel would be a lot less useful.

  2. #2
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    They come in handy when deep dropping and/or fishing big tide swings where its necessary to use plenty of weight.
    I would keep it.
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  3. #3

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    Own your own boat capable of getting out to the deep drops? You'll be glad you have it.

    Dependent on friends or charters for your ride? You'll seldom get to use it.

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    Great way to try for blackcod. You might be able to pull some out of PWS.

  5. #5
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MGH55 View Post
    Great way to try for blackcod. You might be able to pull some out of PWS.
    300m of line is a little shallow for decent sablefish fishing in the Sound. I wonder if he could spool more on there if he used braided or something else with a smaller diameter? Get down below 1,200' (ideally below 1,600') and it would be awesome to have an electric reel.

  6. #6
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    Keep it for deep dropping. Spool it with 65# braid & you can have fun finding out what bites at 2,000 feet!

  7. #7

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    Quote: "300m of water, 4~5 hooks, I get to pull 50 pounds worth of cod at the push of a button."

    I'm curious about the 4-5 hook thing. Excepting sabiki rigs for herring, I thought it was 2 hook max. I'd love to get a boat load of cod, though.

  8. #8
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    027.jpg

    Electric downrigger with this spool @ 750 ft.

    Electric reel with the other spool @ 2300 ft.

    500lb J.B hollow braid!

    P.S 2 hooks only up here

    Mike

  9. #9

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    I'm in northern Japan, on the ocean side you don't have a hook limit. We take a charter boat about 30 miles out to the shelf drop off, I make up for the cost by pulling a lot of fish

    I think I have it loaded with 120# braided. I don't know how much line I got there but with 300 meters out (almost 1,000 feet) I probably have 2/3 of my spool left.

    I just don't know if I'll be too busy playing with salmon and other species to be using it that much :\

  10. #10
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    The next time you go out on the Japanese charter boat - ask the occupants how they like sablefish (blackcod)? The majority of the commercial blackcod taken in Alaska go directly to the Japanese market. Their enthusiasm ought to make it clear that you should hang onto that electric reel for deep-dropping into Alaskan blackcod habitat (check Brian M's post #5 above). They will be delicious a contribution to your seasonal catch. We use 2 small circle hooks spaced about 6 to 8 feet apart, and pieces of food-quality squid for bait. (You will also catch Rougheye, Shortraker, and Thornyhead rockfish at these depths.)

    Split your blackcod and leave the skin on. Make "half-steak" cuts and marinade the pieces in teriyaki sauce for approximately 30 to 45 minutes. Place on a sheet of foil on your BBQ grill with the skin down. When they are ready to eat your spatula will separate the flesh from the skin and they are ready to serve. Good luck!

  11. #11

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    Do you guys happen to have true cod? Proper cod is very low on fat which makes it ideal for salting. I got quite a few recipes that use salted cod

  12. #12
    Member Rob B's Avatar
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    Keep that rod and feel. Fill it with 55lb dendoh braid and fish for black cod. Or deep halibut.


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  13. #13
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbcooper View Post
    Do you guys happen to have true cod? Proper cod is very low on fat which makes it ideal for salting. I got quite a few recipes that use salted cod
    Yes. I'm fairly sure that pacific cod (sometimes called grey cod) is the same thing as what you're calling true cod. There are places where you can load up on them. Homer is a great option.

    As for "black cod" that people are referring to, they are not a cod at all. Their proper name is sablefish, and they're unrelated to cod. They're very high fat, oily, and absolutely delicious. If you have a chance to fish deep, give it a try.

  14. #14
    Member Jack in Alaska's Avatar
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    I have two Miya Epoch reels aboard. My wife loves them as her hands are not able to deal with a conventional reel. We fish halibut in 200' of water and they work great. Both reels need to be sent to Calif. every other year for tune up.
    keep them for the ladies........

  15. #15

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    Wheredo you send them and how much does it cost you? Mine is due for A service.

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    Quote Originally Posted by dbcooper View Post
    Do you guys happen to have true cod? Proper cod is very low on fat which makes it ideal for salting. I got quite a few recipes that use salted cod
    Just did some reading & it looks like the cod you were catching off the coast of Japan is the same species of cod that guys in Alaska catch (grey cod, pacific cod). Very mild & a bit sweet, I enjoy adding these to our catch every chance I get.

  17. #17
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    Default Trying to figure out if I should keep my electric reel setup.

    Buy the Dawia Electric reels either 750 or 1000 I have them both I've caught many many fish on them plus one anchor that was brought to the surface. For line I use 60 pound braided from eBay.( don't knocked it till you try it)



    Do I give my friends advice? Jesus, no. They wouldn't take advice from me. Nobody should take advice from me. I haven't got a clue about anything..

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