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Thread: Most affordable & available centerfire round chambering?

  1. #1
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    Default Most affordable & available centerfire round chambering?

    Ok so I am looking for an excuse to buy another rifle for my 3 (ages 4-9) kids to shoot a lot (or myself I am being totally honest). I have a .22lr bolt action (CZ) and a handful of Ruger M77s in 22-250, .243, .308.

    I am wanting my kids to transition from shooting the .22lr to a center fire caliber but still hoping for something that isn't $20/box to shoot. So maybe bulk ammo. What do people think would be a good bolt action caliber rifle for training? I don't reload. The .243 is what my kids will start shooting and I am hoping to give each of them their own .243 as a first rifle (perfect for Southeast AK Sitka Black-tail deer).

    .223 or 7.62x39 or something else? I am leaning towards a CZ or another M77 but really the discussion is the cheap caliber to shoot, and something that I could buy a more expensive box of hunting rounds wouldn't hurt to make a case for one caliber or another either.

    Sobie2

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    Member Music Man's Avatar
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    You need to get into reloading and load up some low power .243's for them to learn on.
    When seconds count, the cops are just minutes away.
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  3. #3

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    Amen. While you're at it, get the LEE gear for casting your own. Electric lead pot, mold and sizer for under $100 total.

  4. #4

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    .30 to .33 cents a cartridge for 5.56X45mm (.223 Rem.) and plenty for deer and black bear with the 77 gr. bullet. Factory ammo from 40 gr. to 77 gr. including Barnes bullets. Low recoil. get an AR-15 for $499.00 with a telescoping stock so it adjustable for each of them instantly. Your going to be there to back them up on deer and black bear anyway. A lot of rural "Skilled" riflemen use .223 Rem. for moose. And you could have different uppers in 6.8 SPC-II which is right near a .243 Win. for horse power, with factory cartridges from 75 Gr. to 130 gr. ammo is about .50 cents a cartridge and up.

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    Member Akheloce's Avatar
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    Right now, .223 is by far the most affordable.

    I still think reloading is the way to go, but if not, .223 is a no brainer.

    Higher quality rifles are more easily available in .223 than 7.62x39.

    A couple years ago, .223 was hard to find for political reasons. Manufacturers ramped up production, and now there is a bit of a glut.

    Every 4 years, there is potential for .223 to become scarce. Oddball and unpopular cartridges are more easily available in times of political unease.

    Best advice is to get a nice 223 rifle in whatever flavor you choose (for kids I'd go single shot bolt like a Savage or similar). Buy a variety of ammo for it; find which shoots best in it, then stock up on a bunch of that round now while they're plentiful and relatively cheap.

    I don't see .223 ammo (or any for that matter) getting any cheaper than right now.
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    Member Libertine's Avatar
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    Without a doubt .223/5.56 ammo is THE choice among affordable and plentiful center fire rifle cartridges. Also the low recoil factor would make a good choice for kids. 35 cents per round is a fair price.


    If I may suggest an alternative choice, how about the commonly available 12 gauge shotgun shell? Common target loads go for $6 to $6.50 for a box---about 25 cents a round. Add some moving clay targets and you can get some fun target practice in with long guns should paper punching become a bore. When the last run on guns and ammo started after Sandy Hook, 12 gauge shot shells could still be found, while .223/5.56 and other popular calibers were not on store shelves.


    As mentioned before, reloading your own ammo is the sure fire way to ensure cartridge availability and affordability. Not to mention having another fun hobby and better quality ammo.

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    As a youth rifle weight and fit will go a long way toward making the person being trained comfortable. Is the CZ 223 carbine lighter than a 77 ?
    if your not going to roll your own a CZ in 223 might fit the bill. Too bad the 22 Hornet isn't cheaper. That's a round that has found its way into
    more than one custom "little rifle" over the years.

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    If you are going 223 bolt gun and want to shoot bullets heavier than 55gr you will need a twist faster than the 1/12 that most bolt guns come with. The 7.62 x39 would be a good choice but the 223 has it beat for availability. Do consider starting to reload. It's not that difficult or expensive to get started and you can cut ammo prices in half or more depending on what you shoot.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Libertine View Post
    If I may suggest an alternative choice, how about the commonly available 12 gauge shotgun shell? Common target loads go for $6 to $6.50 for a box---about 25 cents a round. Add some moving clay targets and you can get some fun target practice in with long guns should paper punching become a bore. When the last run on guns and ammo started after Sandy Hook, 12 gauge shot shells could still be found, while .223/5.56 and other popular calibers were not on store shelves.
    .
    Excellent idea! Although the op may not be into "bird" hunting but his kids may enjoy getting into it. Imo....there ain't nothing for a kid quite like seeing a duck fall out of the air......lol.
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

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    Yeah,,, I'd have to say .223 as well. The best deal you'll get is to buy a 1,000 rounds loose case. That with a decent bolt action rifle will last you a while.

  11. #11

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    Don't know about Alaska prices, but if you are talking about a big game caliber in the lower 48, it would be the 30 30.

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    Shawlerbrook
    I think it might surprise you what a lot of bush folks in Ak. think is a big game round. Think cheap and available. (223)

  13. #13

    Smile

    I foolishly sold a tack driving .223 caliber 788 Remington years ago and only have a 5.56 AR from LaRue Tactical now. I have talked to many Alaskan Natives and I am well aware of the popularity of the .223 Mini 14 and other semi autos in rural Alaska. I am glad I can't see how many animals are wounded and lost with that caliber. I am also aware some very good shots and very skilled hunters can put that tiny diameter bullet in the right place and have pretty good results.

    I do not consider the .223 Remington a big game round, no matter what .223 bullet is used, although I know it will kill Sitka deer all day long, but it is a poor choice for a salmon fed black bear. I believe a .243 Winchester, 30-30 Winchester, etc. with a good hunting bullet is the minimum for big game.

    Aside from my opinion that many won't agree with, the .223 Remington would be the cheapest route to go with.

    I also believe we owe it to the big game animal to kill it as quickly as possible, not as cheaply as possible.

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    338mag
    I agree, the 223 is to light to be a humane round for bigger game. When I lived in Nome, I saw a moose that had just been shot with a 223. It took 10 shots. You have to understand that these folks are not sport hunters but simply putting meat on the table. Still doesn't sit well with me. I didn't stick around for the skinning but he had hit it just about everywhere and I can only imagine how much tore up meat was lost. He was using 55gr soft points and a mini14.

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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    I do not consider the .223 Remington a big game round, no matter what .223 bullet is used, although I know it will kill Sitka deer all day long, but it is a poor choice for a salmon fed black bear. I believe a .243 Winchester, 30-30 Winchester, etc. with a good hunting bullet is the minimum for big game.

    Aside from my opinion that many won't agree with, the .223 Remington would be the cheapest route to go with.

    I also believe we owe it to the big game animal to kill it as quickly as possible, not as cheaply as possible.
    Definitely agree, and think 22 Fs should be relegated to varmint shooting.

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