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Thread: Hunting Knife Question

  1. #1
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    Question Hunting Knife Question

    I have had a number of knives in my life but I would like to get one knife to be my primary. My problem is you cant know without review what blades will keep an edge the best. I am not so worried about price as you pay for what you get. My pa had a knife that he could go a whole season (elk, deer, pronghorn) and not have to sharpen it till the end of the season and carried it for over 60 years. (the company went out of business years ago). I know there are quality knives out there and if you could tell me your favorite fixed blade knife company and how they performed I would greatly appreciate it.

  2. #2
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Cutco

    I have several Cutco knives and none have let me down. I own two of their hunting knives, both with the "diamond-d" serrated blades. They both made it through several animals (one knife field dressed 5 caribou, 2 moose, and one black bear) before needing to be sharpened. Send them back to Cutco in the off season and for $3 (shipping) they are ready to go for many more animals. I also really like the blaze orange handles they offer, makes it really easy to spot them in the muck when they get dropped .
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  3. #3
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default Hunting knife

    There are a number of quality, custom knife makers. In addition to the maker I look at the type of steel used. Again there are any number of quality steels available and used but one of the newest and one with which I have been very impressed with is S30V. Enclosed link is for information on the various steels and their attributes as relates to knife blades if you are interested. http://www.agrussell.com/knife_infor...les/steel.html

  4. #4
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default Cutco

    I second the recommendation for the cutco. I used my Drop point serated to skin 3 bears this spring and the knife is still some what sharp. As said above they will sharpen it for life. I also have thier fishing knife, great knife as well.


    Steve

  5. #5
    Member Adventures's Avatar
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    Default on this note

    I have a cutco, Doube D edge knife I spent $178 on last year and i used it once and just didn't like it all that much. it's the niceest hunting knife they offer. http://www.cutco.com/products/produc...itemGroup=1769
    with the black handle and 7 1/2" blade if I remember right. If anyone has the same knife without the double D and would like to trade i would love to make that deal. Or maybee I'll jst sell it outright. I find it not very good at skinning due to the D serations, only tried it on one bear. I own a whole block full of cutco knives and I love every one of them including 4 fishermans solutions, but this knife is not my favorite. Just my experience, I hear plenty of other people love it. Give me an old timer or a good buck for 1/5th the price and I can skin all day.
    I believe my next purchase will be a benchmade, I tried a buddies and that thing is sweet.
    just my .02
    Justin
    Justin

  6. #6

    Default Look at the Helle Knives!

    I've got many quality hunting knives but have never seen any better than the Helle Knives! The unique lamination of stainless razor blade steel between 18/8 stainless steel, makes for a very tough and incredibly sharp knife, that holds an edge for a very long time. Best thing is you don't have to send it back to get it sharpened! Just touch it up with a diamond or rod sharpener. Price is right , too. Last year, as a guide, I did two moose, six deer and Lord knows what else... before sharpening it at the end of season. Check helle out at www.helleknives.com

  7. #7

    Default Sorry, I double posted...

    I don't know how to get rid of the second post. Sorry!
    Last edited by MEtracker; 07-02-2007 at 08:20. Reason: Posted same thing twice

  8. #8

    Default Knives

    I got a Hibben Alaska Hunter Series gift from my brother a few years back and I can say it's the best I've used over the years, which include most of the brands conventionally available (Buck, Gerber, Kershaw, etc.). No problem doing one moose without sharpening and when I finally did sharpen it was more of a touch up process and good to go. In fact, I went back and bought their combo set (gave my wife the one) and love the small blade equally.

    I say this as one whom does not like sharpening any more than painting; to me it's a necessary evil, although I'm pretty good at it with the right attitude. I've read a lot about the Cutco and they sound good from all the responses I've read.

  9. #9
    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    Default Knife Selection

    When I looked at knife selection, I talked to several trappers and taxidermist since those are the guys that do the best job by far when it comes to clean skinning and cape quality.
    I have never met a trapper or a taxidermist that carried a serrated knife. (Sorry Guys!)
    Than I went with size, weight and edge. Since weight is a limiting factor on most of my trips, I tried to get a single knife that would work best for both skinning and caping. For a long time I used a Buck 102. It is not the best knife for skinning or caping, but as a combo knife I found it worked very well! It is a bugger to sharpen, but once it is sharp, it stays sharp for a long time providing u use a good quality steel to keep the edge on.
    Than I found the Knives Of Alaska Alpha Wolf series and found it to be even better than the Buck 102. If you can carry both, I would suggest you look at the wolf/cub combo from Knives Of Alaska for the ultimate skinning and caping combination.
    If you choose to go with an Alpha Wolf, make sure you get the S30V series. It has a harder steel rating and keeps an edge longer!

    Alpha Wolf Drop Point Hunter S30V - Suregrip Steel: S30V Rockwell Hardness: 62-63 Bevel: 18-20 Knife Length: 7-7/8" Blade Length: 3-3/4"
    Attached Images Attached Images

  10. #10

    Default Its all about the steel

    I started looking into this same subject when my Kershaw 420 stainless wouldn't hold an edge worth a ****.

    All knives are built for different usage. Some of the stainless knives with good corrosion resistance hold a poor edge. For animal processing, the knife you want will be of a quality steel for holding an edge and Rockwell hardness of 60 or greater. Look for steel like D2, S30v, S60v, A2, BG42 and many more. There is a steel out of Japan called ZIP-189(I think) at rockwell 65 that is supposed to be awesome.

    Steel like Aus6 (or8), 440A just plain won't hold an edge as well as the others above.
    Here is another resource that is excellent;
    http://www.bladeforums.com/forums/

    Another note, these harder steels are a bit harder to sharpen. Thats why you see alot of taxidermists with a $6 Victorianox in one hand and a steel in the other. Those cheap knives sharpen quickly!

  11. #11
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    Default dentist's tool

    During the last visit to the dentist, he talked about some of his tools that go through a process that makes them a 95 (diamond is a 100?) and stay sharp a long time. The older style tools he felt never got resharpened as sharp as the original. The new ones do not need resharpening.
    He said something about a Russian engineer that developed a process, then joined up with a company to make the tools. I guess there is a military application at 97.
    I have to go back again to sit in the chair. When I do, I will ask him for more info. He is an old hunter, so may have already thought about that application.
    I wonder how well a knife that hard would work?

  12. #12
    Member AK145's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Cutco Baby....

    I have several, but like the straight blade...non serated (sp?) the best. I can't remember how much I paid for mine...but it was less than $100 I believe. I love it and use it often!

    Now my wife wants the kitcken set...that's some ching there boy!

  13. #13
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    Default Marble's Knives

    I have used one for years and use it to skin, flesh, and cut up meat afterword. The knives are American made and fantastic. I love it and it helps Michigan's crappy economy.

    http://www.marblesoutdoors.com/index.html

    Gooch

  14. #14
    Member bigswede358's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Buck 110

    Its not a fixed blade, but its a darn good knife. Holds an edge, durable, won't brake the bank. I use mine to field dress, skin, cape, and butcher whitetails, black bears, elk, and mulies. The only problem i've had is using it as a prying tool on some stuborn elk ivories, about an 1/8 inch of the tip broke. I sent it to them and it was replaced. I don't think you can go wrong with this knife. Just my .02.
    LIVE TO HUNT....HUNT TO LIVE!!!!

  15. #15

    Smile My recommendation is Cutco

    After about 44 years of Alaska hunting, I recommend the Cuto knives, excellent quality, stays sharp for several animals, and the orange handle saves time looking for it in the tundra! I recommend the straight edge for meat cutting, boning out, and the serrated edge for cutting work, sawing if needed, skinning too.

  16. #16

    Default

    If I going way back....... I take an Old Hickory 7" butcher knife and a 4' pairing knife along with a medium diamond "steel". It doesn't hold a fine edge for long, but a couple of strokes on the edge of the oval hone and I'm back in business. It takes less time to process an animal than using a harder steel knife that, while holding a useable edge for a longer time, doesn't keep that fine edge all that long and takes forever to get back.
    Dan

  17. #17

    Default Vote for Cold Steel here

    I love my cold steel. Scared of gettin flamed right here, but its the best knive i have ever used on anything. Skinned a moose, cut up half the meat, and still shaves. The master hunter is the perfect size, long round edge, blades not too long, good thick but well tapered blade, and very well balanced. I carry it everywhere.
    http://www.coldsteel.com/fixed-blade...er-hunter.html

  18. #18

    Default Puma White Hunter

    I have a Puma White Hunter that was given to me as a gift but have never tried it, as it was kind of large to pack around and have always just used a Buck Folding Hunter BU-110 instead, that seems to work fine if I take the time to sharpen it really well before each trip. But I was wondering if anyone had actually used the Puma before? Thanks.

  19. #19
    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    Default Alpha Wolf

    Besides the steel and lenght of time I can skin with the alpha wolf, what I like best about it is that it is light, it feels great in my hand and it is well balanced. But! I have bigger hands, so one knife does not fit all. The alpha has a nice sized and shaped handle, but a right sized (3.5") blade.

  20. #20
    Member cusackla's Avatar
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    Default Alpha Wolf

    Besides the steel and length of time I can skin with the alpha wolf, what I like best about it is that it is light, it feels great in my hand and it is well balanced. But! I have bigger hands and like most things, one knife does not fit all. The alpha has a nice sized and shaped handle, but a right sized (3.5") blade.

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