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Thread: Sea run Dollies in Seward

  1. #1
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    Default Sea run Dollies in Seward

    I have heard that time is nearly here to give er a go at some dollies in rez bay. Looking for some advice on how to land a few. Advice for flies and spin set ups would be great! As well as where to go, when, etc. My boy and I are just learning to fly fish, so we are looking for opportunities to practice. But we are not opposed to falling back to old faithful if necessary! thanks in advance

  2. #2

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    Only fished for them in Rez Bay once quite a few years ago, and that was the last week of June. I found them anywhere I wetted a line in the bay, with concentrations around the river/creek mouths. I was fly fishing, and they really slammed slender #4 Clausers in chartreuse/white as well as small pink shrimp. Bud was casting a 1/4 oz silver Crocodile and did almost as well. Fishing ground to a halt quickly once the tide started falling but was downright hot the first three hours of incoming. I'm sure lots of folks on here have more recent reports and can say more about other months.

  3. #3
    Member cod's Avatar
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    As I recall, Preachers Pond, along the hiway has dollies in it as soon as the ice is off it. Good place to get warmed up.
    Grouse Lake also is full of dollies but they quickly drop out the creek as soon as the ice leaves. ( if there was ice on these waters this warm winter).
    Then in late April thru May, we got dollies on the fly and spin fishing Lowell Pt.
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    Thanks for the info. I know of several places to hit them in fresh water. Just thought it would be fun give it a go on the saltwater. So i have heard everything from early April, on through July. Any idea on how to pare down the dates? or do they run the entire time?

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by beekeeper86 View Post
    Any idea on how to pare down the dates? or do they run the entire time?
    They spill out of freshwater into the salt at more or less the same time each spring, then hang there and feed for months until they start coming back up into the rivers mid-summer to early fall. Before they fall out, you're kinda wasting your time in salt water, but once they move out to the salt they get pretty scarce in the fresh if there's any way for them to get to the ocean. Dunno the timing for Rez, but here at home they start heading out to the salt late in April or early May (depending on water temp), then start back into fresh mid-to late July, mostly timed to the peak of the pink salmon run.

    Someone else can fill in on the timing for Rez, I'm sure.

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    Quote Originally Posted by beekeeper86 View Post
    Any idea on how to pare down the dates? or do they run the entire time?
    Not to be a smart-A, but since your location says Seward....You could go fishing and give it a try......pick a few likely spots and take a couple hours once or twice a week and go hit a couple likely spots during the appropriate tide cycle. Try some different sized lures or flies until you figure out what matches the available feed and eventually, you'll have it dialed in. I'm guessing, that over the course of a couple spring seasons one could get timing and locations at least somewhat dialed in. Every year is different conditions-wise so timing will likely vary as well.

  7. #7

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    Carry a thermometer with you and keep tabs on the stream temps. On my home river 3 days in a row of 42 degree temps usually starts the dollies downriver.

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    Member FishGod's Avatar
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    Pink and chum fry are the first salmon species to out-migrate into saltwater. As mentioned, this movement is dictated by temperature. This "usually" takes place from early May through June.
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  9. #9
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    My experience at the mouth of the Homer harbor has been incoming tides in the spring, mid April to June. Usually with arrival of shorebirds. I know of one caught there by a troller already this year.
    Watch for feeding fish and cast to one side or the other. Lots of times I would just "be ready" until I saw a boil, no sense having your fly in the wrong place.


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