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Thread: What is in your Backcountry First Aid kit?

  1. #1
    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    Default What is in your Backcountry First Aid kit?

    I'm reevaluating my first aid kit and just wondering what other people are carrying.

    Mine consists of:
    Leukotape
    mole skin
    bandaids
    extra strength tylenol
    imodium AD (anti-diarrhea)
    cleaning wipes
    superglue
    rubber gloves
    lighter
    melatonin

    I'm curious to see what everybody else is carrying, to maybe make my kit a little better.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I'm ready to update mine as well, but off the top of my head we carry:

    Leukotape
    Ace bandage wrap
    bandaids
    skin stapler
    ibuprofen
    prescription-strength painkiller

    Can't think of anything else off the top of my head, but there might be a couple more items...

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    Quote Originally Posted by duckslayer56 View Post
    I'm reevaluating my first aid kit and just wondering what other people are carrying.

    Mine consists of:
    Leukotape
    mole skin
    bandaids
    extra strength tylenol
    imodium AD (anti-diarrhea)
    cleaning wipes
    superglue
    rubber gloves
    lighter
    melatonin

    I'm curious to see what everybody else is carrying, to maybe make my kit a little better.
    Just curious about the melatonin. You look pretty young (from your forum pic) to need a supplement to help you get to sleep. Or does it have another use?

  4. #4
    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    I forgot, I carry a tube of carmex too.

    I'm 34, so not too old yet I guess. When I'm out hunting my mind is usually going 100 miles an hour thinking about the next day, especially if I've seen some game that we'll be stalking. Sometimes I just can't sleep, so I take a couple melatonin tablets to help if that happens.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
    "Swans are a gift" -DucksandDogs
    I am a shoveler's worst nightmare!

  5. #5
    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    I carry

    Electrical tape
    Bandaids and some type of antiseptic
    Alcohol wipes
    Ibuprofen or Tylenol
    Ace bandage
    Emergency blanket
    Toilet paper
    550 cord
    Fire starter and waterproof matches
    My Delorme Explorer
    And that's about it.
    I figure if I can't stop the bleeding with a bandaid electrical tape or my belt that I always wear it's time to use the Delorme.

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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    After having hunted with my brother, I take a cabelas 550 bag. This includes a military surgical setup and enough drugs and goodies to deal with a danger prone person in a 3rd world country.

    one day closer to alaska.
    "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

    Edwin Hubble

  7. #7

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    Not to High'Jack the thread..........But curious as to what has been members most common injury when in the field. Mine is a stick poked in the eye, never real bad, so as to require medical attention, but seems to happen a few times each year.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    Not to High'Jack the thread..........But curious as to what has been members most common injury when in the field. Mine is a stick poked in the eye, never real bad, so as to require medical attention, but seems to happen a few times each year.
    For me: sprained ankle, dislocated shoulder, fish hook through the ear (or ina finger or hand), managable knife cuts. Maybe I'm accident prone(?)..

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    ...managable knife cuts. Maybe I'm accident prone(?)..
    That's my most common injury in the field. Somehow I always manage to cut myself at least once when butchering an animal. Has never been bad, but dang...I always have one moment that bites me. Never more than a bandaid so far.

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    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    For me: sprained ankle, dislocated shoulder, fish hook through the ear (or ina finger or hand), managable knife cuts. Maybe I'm accident prone(?)..
    You sure sound like my brother.....add in chapped bleeding lips, 3rd degree burns and you are

    one day closer to alaska.
    "Equipped with his five senses, man explores the universe around him and calls the adventure science"

    Edwin Hubble

  11. #11

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    In the event of a bad enough emergency, your best bet is going to be the ability to call for help anyway so a Sat Phone is at the top of my list for first aid/emergency gear, as well as a list of emergency contact numbers.


    The rest of my kit is mostly focused on treating minor to moderate injuries (cuts, scrapes, sprains, diarrhea, allergic reactions) as well as a few things that would buy time if I had to wait for help in a more serious emergency (quick clot). Many of our trips are fly-in or way off the road system...running back to town for supplies or emergency dental work isn't a realistic option, or at the very least ends the trip. Additionally, I usually have a small bottle with Tylenol and ibuprofen either in my bino pouch or my bathroom bag.


    Iridium Sat Phone with emergency contact numbers


    Medical Supplies
    Moleskin 1 4x4" piece
    Large Band aids-4
    Small band aids-4
    Non adherent dressings- 2
    4"x4" gauze pads-4
    2"x2" gauze pads-2
    Triple antibiotic ointment packets- 4
    Alcohol pads-6
    Sting relief pads-2
    Cotton tipped applicators-2
    Nitrile Gloves- 1 pair
    Quick Clot Pack 3.5"x3.5"-1
    Needle nose tweezers-1 set
    Derma bond applicator- 1
    4' of 1" transpore tape
    10cc syringe- 1
    Den temp temporary dental filling- One kit


    Medications
    Alkaseltzer- 3 packets
    Tylenol- 4 packets (500mg each)
    Ibuprofen- 4 packets (400mg each)
    Vicodin- (5/3251) bottle left over from dental procedure, probably around 20 pills
    Benadryl- 4 packets (50mg each)
    Diflucan- 1 pill (150mg)


    Repair Kit
    Sewing kit: 3 needles, assorted thread, 3 buttons of varying sizes, 6 safety pins, small scissors
    Superglue
    Aqua Seal UV
    (If pack rafting, we have a separate raft repair kit with the boats)


    We store everything but the sat phone (it has its own dry bag) in a small 2L roll top dry bag, and the interior contents are divided up into other ziplock bags to keep things organized. If I remember right, the kit in the dry bag weighs around 14oz.


    [

  12. #12
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Good call on the syringe. Being able to irrigate a deep cut with water would be key. I think I'll be adding that to our kit.

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    I put together two identical kits, one for my vehicle, the other for my wife's vehicle. They are both in orange sea-to-summit ultra-light roll down bags as well. The one thing I have in them I can think of that may be of additional value here is a blood clotting agent or powder. My wife is anemic and for us it is a valuable addition. I use a product from a local store, actually one is a powder and another is integrated into a gauze type pad. It works well as we have had to use the products around the house.

    In addition to super glue I bought a few tubes of a 3m blue colored skin sealant (not loctite) although I can't remember the name. It came from and sold for farming medical supply. Problem with specialty products is the expiration dates.

    I put a few water purification tablets in as well. As for sat phone, where I live I can get either GSM or CDMA cell reception so in addition to my AT&T phone I keep a Verizon flip phone which I activate during hunting season and rely on the free non-activated 911 option after. The spot device seems like a less expensive alternative to a sat phone but I don't know if it only works or should be used for extreme emergencies.

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    The most important thing you can put in your first aid kit is training. I'm a wilderness EMT and what is in my kits vary based on how manny are in my party, what we are doing, and how far we are out. Lots of you are putting supper glue in your kits. I'm assuming that you are using it to close lacerations. I would advise against this practice, because you can't adequately clean a wound in the woods. If you seal a unclean wound you increase the likely hood of getting an infection.
    I carry stiri strips and opp sights to close lacerations in the field. If the wound becomes infected the strips can be easily removed for re-cleaning the wound and allow for drainage. I fully expect to hear from the "I've done it hundreds of times" crowd, but it only takes once to get a major infection. I have a friend that had to have two surgeries after getting a small cut skinning out a bear and getting a massive infection.


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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I'm a big fan of the Israeli 4" bandage and quick clot bandages. I also carry a CAT tourniquet. Otherwise I have the standard, bandaid, guaze, tape that everyone else has.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleBugle View Post
    The most important thing you can put in your first aid kit is training. I'm a wilderness EMT and what is in my kits vary based on how manny are in my party, what we are doing, and how far we are out. Lots of you are putting supper glue in your kits. I'm assuming that you are using it to close lacerations. I would advise against this practice, because you can't adequately clean a wound in the woods. If you seal a unclean wound you increase the likely hood of getting an infection.
    Happened to a friend of mine. He whacked the tip of a finger off and glued it back on with superglue. Dog yards are something less than completely sanitary and he ended up hospitalized for a week with a very serious infection.
    Mushing Tech: squeezing the romance out of dog mushing one post at a time

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    As said.... #1 some knowledge and training. Much can be done with that and duct tape. Also just being carefull to not do dumb stuff like cut toward yourself or your partner, etc. In the words of John Wayne.... "If you're gonna be dumb you gotta be tough"

    Here's my list and I've used it all. Well, either me or my partner. Never have had to hit SOS on the SPOT though. I need to add something like quickclot I think. I do have a small tube of something. I see Becca mentions some quick dental stuff. hmmm.

    SPOT

    Moleskin
    Tape- Athletic and Duct
    band aids
    gauze
    ointment
    anti-diareha OTC
    anti-nausea RX
    pain meds RX
    Muscle relaxers RX
    Rolaids
    contact lenses/saline
    Eye drops
    ibuprofen
    sleep aid
    lip balm
    throat lozenges
    sinus meds
    TP/ antibacterial WetOnes wipes, ointment prep H (small amnt)
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleBugle View Post
    I have a friend that had to have two surgeries after getting a small cut skinning out a bear and getting a massive infection.
    If you cut yourself with bear stank on ya, brown bear for sure....it can kill ya, and you don't even need to have sealed up a dirty wound. I remember reading an ADN article years ago about a guy that got sick. It didn't go away, got worse and worse, and he ended up in the hospital. The doctors couldn't figure out what was wrong, and meanwhile he was going downhill fast. After continuously asking him tons of the normal questions....what did you do? What did you eat? Where did you go? etc... they were still stumped and asked him one last time what he could have possibly done out of the ordinary and it finally jogged his memory, even though he didn't think it was relevant. He told them that quite awhile before all this happened he had cut himself, a small cut, while skinning up a brownie. The doctors finally figured out that a brown bear has a certain bug (can't remember the name) that if it gets into your bloodstream it can really do some damage. It seemed that it took quite some time though for it to make him sick but he did almost die from it. So if you find yourself getting some kind of weird sickness some time after getting a cut when doin' up that brownie.....don't forget about it or it might be the last thing you forgot.....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  19. #19
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    Wow. Would that have been Tularemia?
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    tube of neosporin
    allergy meds
    bandaids
    latex gloves
    aspirin

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