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Thread: Kodiak early September silvers ?

  1. #1
    Member Col. F Rodder's Avatar
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    Default Kodiak early September silvers ?

    Been a few years since my last trip to the Emerald Island to fish silvers (road system). Have been twice, 2009 & 10 and fished around the dates of 9/12-18th. Had good success on several of the rivers, 2010 was tough with the lack of rainfall
    Because of work would have to come more like 9/06 this year for about 7-8 days. Are there enough fish coming into river, excluding the Buskin to swing and strip some flies? Have been itching to get back.

    Also has anyone had success actually fishing the salt off the beaches on crusing fish. I live in WA and fish Puget Sound beaches for resident fish and ocean goers prior to them entering the rivers. Fishing points around tidal swings is the typical method, stripping clousers. Would think off Kalsin or Ugak bay would be good or possibly the flats near the Russian and Sargent.

  2. #2
    Charterboat Operator Abel's Avatar
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    More fish than you can shake a stick at. By that time frame there will be plenty of silvers in the rivers, and plenty in the ocean in yet to work the beaches with.
    Life's to short for an ugly boat

    Blaze N Abel Charters
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  3. #3

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    Watch the rain pattern. No snow pack, just like last year. So the rivers are going to get lower than low and the silvers are going to hold off in saltwater, just like last year if it's also a dry summer. So little water coming down the rivers in August and September last year there were big die-offs of pinks and Pasagshak got closed off by a sandbar for a couple of months.

    All was fixed once the fall rains started, but a whole lot of guys showed up wishing they had changed their plane reservations till October. Just sayin, don't buy cheap non-refundable/changeable plane tickets and check the rain history before going through airport security. Fishing will be nuts offshore in that case, but pretty frustrating for the shorebound.

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    Member Kodiakfly's Avatar
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    Like Hank said, we gotta have the water. Most other species it's not an issue because pinks and chum will run in anything and they spawn low. Reds run early enough in the year that we're usually not dry yet. But silvers can really swing late if we don't have the water.

    As for the beach thing, I've always enjoyed doing it, but it's far more popular in dry years than it is in wet ones. Last year was dry, so the beaches were pretty busy.

  5. #5

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    Rain or not, if you can swing a boat ride early in September, offshore fly fishing can be nutso. Cruising silvers, silvers crashing bait schools, silvers in the kelp, they'll be on hand with open mouths. Get tired of silvers, or just want to experience a different tug, large (6#-8#) black and dusky rockfish are plenty shallow to reach with the same 8WT fly rod you're casting for silvers. Type 6 sinktip for both rockfish and silvers, so bring an extra spool along with the usual floater for beach and river casting.

    BTW- If you haven't caught the big rockfish on a fly rod, you'll be thinking 10WT after the first hookup. They pull about has hard as any fish you've seen, if the runs aren't long. Clausers dominate offshore for both silvers and rockfish, and they're not too shabby on the beaches. But bring along some surface flies, especially Crease Flies or similar slim poppers. When you get into a school of rockfish you can often pull them up to the surface after you've caught a few. Then the action really starts. We keep rods rigged with floating lines and Crease flies within easy reach when we start hooking up on the sinking lines/Clausers, then make a quick switch when the fish come up. If you think a largemouth bass can cut a big hole in the water hitting poppers, you should see what a rockfish can do!

    Nice thing about the rockfish up in the top 30' of water, no problems with releasing them. Pretty quick you'll be dodging the silvers in your search for more rockfish action.

  6. #6
    Member Col. F Rodder's Avatar
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    Was curious how you guys felt about the tides, big vs small in bringing the fish in. Was looking at the dates of 9/6- 13th but tides are fairly weak which usually results in less fish. Need to fit trip around work schedule which gets busy for me starting mid month.
    Tides starting on 9/1 look really good but obviously is a bit early for historical runs timing. Not factoring in weather what are your thoughts?

  7. #7

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    Rain swelling a river is the biggest factor, but as you note, no way to forecast that well enough to adjust work schedules. So we're back to tides.

    Bigger floods will run them further up into the estuary, and on up into the river if the river levels are sufficient. With plenty of river water, any flood is going to do the job. They're spookier on really bright days, and tend to either turn back out or race through the estuary at about 100mph without pausing. Shake it all up in a box, and I'll take early morning floods topping out before noon without regard for the weather or river level. One factor to consider is seals. They'll come into the estuary at about mid-flood and stay there to raise all cob with the estuary fishing. Long and short, low light, first half of the flood.

    But there's a sneaker in that. The silvers will fall out of the estuary on the ebb. We've had excellent fishing early and late in the day for "hold-over" fish in the estuary. They'll start to gather up and stay there after the tide has dropped far enough to chase out the seals. Dream combo is to hit the estuary about 5AM when no one is there in the last couple of hours of the ebb. Work your way down toward the mouth and arrive just as the tide turns. Then follow the fresh fish back up into the estuary as the tide rises. Call it a 5AM start with fishing over by about 10. Evenings can be just as good when mid-ebb is low enough around 5 or 6 with the flood not starting until 8 or 9. You won't have many folks showing up right after work, and staying late can really pay off. It's more about timing and the other conditions than the size of the tides. In my experience big tides bring in the most seals and spoil the fishing all the faster, so you just might be golden.

  8. #8
    Member Col. F Rodder's Avatar
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    http://www.tides.net/alaska/2836/?year=2016&month=09
    Here are the Sept tides for Ugak bay. Bigger swings beginning on the month, smaller less movement starting around the 6th, then getting better again around the 15th.
    I have been twice to Kodiak back in 09 & 10 and never really worried much about tides back then. I was typically a trout fisherman in CO at that point of my fishing scene. 09 was a wet year & 10 was drier than hell. Mainly fished Salonie, Olds & the Pasgshak as my 1st choice rivers.
    I currently live in WA and fish Ho's off the beach in Puget sound and its all tidal driven. Have learned a lot about salmon fishing over the last few years and think more about the other factors other then just showing up.
    I get the whole fur bag thing, they are PITAs. Gotta stop them hot fish on the Shak from running back out to become bait. Like everything it a dice roll on tides, rain and cloud cover. I usually never hit the rivers until around 1st light, the bigger fuzzy things that work the shore I give respect.
    From what you said brownbear, maybe the 6-13th wont be to bad and focus more on the late flood which is a little higher. I killed it in 2010 when those factors presented themself at the Shak. Huge pods of 30/40 fish and multiple hookups among the anglers at the same time as light fell. Then the dance began

  9. #9

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    I think your prospects are good, what with your insights and experience. They'll be there, with fine tuning to match the river levels.

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