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Thread: 22 Magnum for Coyotees

  1. #1
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    Default 22 Magnum for Coyotees

    I just read an article in FFG magazine, consisting of mostly regurgitations.

    I figgered the author was full of beans, but I have never even shot AT a Coyotee.

    His thing was that this new Savage 22 mag Audiomactic rifle was just the ticket for bumping off said wild beast.

    Tell me, EKC, is the 22 mugnum enuff gun for that endeavor? He said out to 100 yds, but his friends assured him of even farther ranges.

    I thunk the 22 Magnum was more like a Fox cartridge. Or a big snowshoe. Or, a huge Texuzz Jack Wabbit.

    I don't doubt for a minute 22 mag would do a Coyotee, and with the 50 grain Federal rounds I have, at a reasonable distance, but plenty gun???

    What else can I do, except, query the Expert Coyotee Killer, and his friends, here on the forum.

    Smitty of the North
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Adequate? Sure. But why limit yourself when pursuing a species that often requires long-distance shots? I almost cringe writing that, as I often roll my eyes at people suggesting that magnum rifles are needed for sheep. Still, in my handful of experiences with coyotes, I've found that longer ranges are frequently the reality and I'm happy to have something with a bit more oomph in my hands.

    .223 is my go-to choice. That might be overkill, but given the outside chance of a wolf showing up one of these days, I'll take it.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Sure you can bump off a coyote with a .22MAG or a .17HMR. Ideal? Not hardly. As Brian mentioned- why limit yourself to a 100yd gun on something that routinely demands longer shooting?
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

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    Yeah, on the range limits. I've clanked quite a few over the years on my visits to the Southwest. You see them all the time when you're out, but it's always a question of reaching them with what's in your hands. Mostly I'm hunting something else when an opportunity pops up, rather than setting out looking for coyotes. They die easy if you can hit them in the first place. Heck, I rolled and killed one on the dead run with an ounce of #6 shot from my 20 gauge while pheasant hunting. At about 30 yards. Killed em with 22LR, 22mag, 17HMR, 222, 223, 22-250, 220 Swift, 243 and 257 Roberts, 20 gauge (once) and 12 gauge (quite few times when they've wandered up to check out my decoys). The thing is, no matter what you're carrying, you'll almost always see some of them out of range.

    If I was on a dedicated coyote poke, I'd be carrying my 22-250 for shots out past 500, just to up my odds. But like I said, I'm usually after something else when I come across them. Ever try to stalk closer to a coyote? Talk about being made to look foolish!

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    I have had mixed results with the .22 mag on coyote. Used to call them in western Wa. There are some big ones in those parts. Take the .223 or .222 or even the .22 Hornet. My brother liked using his Savage in .22 Hi Power on yotes and wolves.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    If I was on a dedicated coyote poke, I'd be carrying my 22-250 for shots out past 500, just to up my odds.
    Out "past" 500 yards? I'm curious as to where you're sighted in at for a possible shot at that kind of range, and what grain slug? I just purchased an older Ruger in that caliber awhile back and haven't shot it much yet....
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  7. #7

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    I have killed a handful of yotes with a 22 mag but I'd never leave the house with a 22 mag if my goal for the day was to kill a coyote or three.

    Brian is pretty much spot on! The last several years I have used my 223 Min-14 early in the season before all the full grown pups have been educated. Usually by New Year's Day all of the open country coyotes have been introduced to 4x4s and the guys driving them. They don't like to be in close proximity to where the bullets are coming from. If you can find a small patch of cover with lots of open cover around it then it will most likely have a coyote holed up on it. Iowa winters have lots of thaw days that put that noisey crust on top of the snow. If you do spot a pair of ears sticking up above the nest in one of those patches then you best plan your injun sneak wisely. Normally the wind is blowing in this part of the world all the time so if you don't use it as your alli the coyote will. For years I used a cushion for putting on the stalk. It was an old couch cushion inside a white trash bag inside a white pillow case. My gun was white, my clothes were white and my binoculars were white. I always tried to used the contour of the ground to hide myself and some times that meant hugging the ground for a long way. That's where the cushion came in. I laid it out in front of me. My rifle and glasses laid on the cushion. I pushed it along in front of me as I crawled to within range. I would push the cushion the length of my arms out in front and then crawl up to it and look at the critter and then repeat those steps. You could read the coyote and tell when he was getting suspicious. It was common for him to wake up and raise his head for a look around. If he started staring your way then you weren't going to get much closer. You didn't dare move an inch when his eyes were glued in your direction. At this point I was no longer using the bino but rather was watching his every breath through the lens of the scope. I can remember vividly how tired and sore my my knees and elbows got from crawling on the rock hard frozen ground. I remember how sore my neck got from laying on my belly with my head held up while on a two hour stalk. Mr coyotie owned the situation you had to follow his lead. The only deviation was a late in the day hunt when it appeared the coyote wasn't going to move until it was dark. I can remember pursing my lips and squeaking like a mouse, barking like a dog, doing my chicken hawk whistle anything to get that stupid coyote to stand up. Sometimes they would raise their head and look at you but refuse to stand up. They even cock their head out of curiosity like a puppy as if thinking what the heck is making the noise. I'd rather not take that head shot but sometimes you have to take what you get. The perfect scenario at this point in the stalk is when the coyote is completely clueless and just decides to get up. He yawns stands up and starts to stretch then boom-whop and the coyote spins in a circle biting at whatever just took a hunk out of his side. I don't spend much time watching but rather roll up to my butt with my elbows on my knees just in case there is a pair and I need to shoot at another one making haste.

    I don't know how many times I have spotted and stalked coyotes in my life but do know the percentages greatly favor the coyote. I have been successful enough times to say that I am good at it. There is more reward in successfully stalking and killing a large alpha coyote than killing a 180 class whitetail(EKC's opinion only). I know which one takes more finess and effort and therein lays the reward.

    For such stalks I will forever and always be using a light weight 243 bolt ac
    action rifle. For years I used a Ruger 77 tang safety model. Then a Winchester Feather Weight also in 243. Then I got real sick and coyote hunting was not in the picture for a few years. I sold most of my guns. Then when I finally felt like hunting again I bought another Mini-14. The scars on my stomach were to fresh to consider crawling on my belly so I was left with the jump and run coyote hunting method. Months turned to years and I felt the need for another 243. I had the advantage of my best Bud owning a gun shop. I got to try lots of guns out for several years. I am back to stalking coyotes again a my weapon of choice these days is a Remington 783 Carbine in 243. It has enough drop in the stock to fit me pretty good. I plan to paint the 783 white and turn it into my stalking rifle. I have a load worked up with Hornady 58 grain VMaxes that will be good for out to 400+ yards. I also have a Vanguard Carbine in 243. It shoots little bitty groups with 100 grain bullets. I have a Axiom Special Ops thumb hole stock ordered for the Weatherby. It will be for league shooting if I can tweak it it just a bit more. A little white tape would make it into a nice spot and stalk gun. I treat my spot and stalk guns like a hammer in a tool box. It doesn't take very many years for me to ugly them up. The Weatherby is to nice to be treated like that and I want to pass it on one day.

  8. #8

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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    Out "past" 500 yards? I'm curious as to where you're sighted in at for a possible shot at that kind of range, and what grain slug? I just purchased an older Ruger in that caliber awhile back and haven't shot it much yet....
    I'm shooting an old heavy barrel Ruger #1, lots of accurizing and a Canjar single-set trigger topped with an old Redfield 6x18 scope, so it sounds like we're in about the same league. Don't recall the zact load because I haven't shot it in a couple of years and it (along with the log for it) is down at our place in the Rockies, scene for most of the action. I can tell you that my standard bullet is a 62 grain Sierra and standard powder is 4320. We're regularly doinking prairie dogs out to 400, and mine is sighted in dead on at 325. Hold head-high on a prairie dog a 400 and you'll hit COM. Back high on a coyote at 500 is hitting a little low, so I try for ear-high.

    That's all in calm air. Get a little breeze going, and Katie bar the door. I've held as much as a coyote length upwind on a standing coyote way out there and hit behind them. We take all comers when it comes to coyotes, so shots can reach to 1k or so. Longest hit anyone's made yet, a bud flattened one a lasered 800 with a 270 Winnie. More a case of the coyote walking under the bullet, I think! We take prairie dog shots that far too, though mostly miss. We're happy to hit close enough to disappear them in a cloud of dust, even if they come out of it in high gear.

  9. #9

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    I typed that last post on my wife's itty bitty cell phone as she drove. It took me exactly an hour. Riding down the interstate at 75 MPH and trying to make these fat fingers hit those little buttons is a crap shoot. So if looks like a third grader wrote it...so be it.

    I just wanted to add that I stalked two coyotes this whole winter. The first one was on snow covered ground and the set up was perfect in my favor. The only thing crossing that big bean stubble field with me that was not white was my rifle. The coyote noticed and bolted at 350 yards. Two weeks later the same coyote was laying by the same corner post only since the wind was out of the north he was now laying on the south side of it opposed to the east side of it. The corner post was an old railroad tie and the wind blowing around it from the north had cause a horse shoe shaped drift on the south side of the post. I could see the coyote laying inside that horse shoe shaped drift. I had one choice and that was to white up and walk 400 yards across a completely open bean field to get in position for a shot. I am a little beyond belly crawling 400 these days. I got to within 300 yards of him and he raised his head up and looked in my direction. I froze in place and he looked right past me. If was a cloudy day or my shadow would have defeated me at that point. He laid his head back down and was facing the opposite direction. That meant two things. That he could not hear me as well as his ears were cupped in the direction his head was laying. that does by the way make a difference especially if they are in the wind at all. He was laying so flat that I had to skim the top of the snow to hit him and with little frangible bullets going way fast that doesn't work so well. At any rate I touched one off and he was up and running. He didn't know where I was so he ran right at me. I froze until we were almost close enough to shake hands then I rolled up onto mr but and killed him with the first shot as he was going straight away.

    That one episode relit my desire to spot and stalk more next year. It also reaffirmed what I already knew and that is that black guns in a background of all white stick out like a sore thumb. However an all white gun becomes as if it isn't even there!

    Back to the 22 mag. It is a lot more effective on coyote sized game if the bullet catches them in a laid back state of mind. A coyote that is shot without a clue to whats about to happen dies a whole easier than one that is in full alarm. Adrenalin has that effect on most critters and a coyote is no different. That is much more noticeable with a marginal cartridge for getting the job done. At 100 yards the 22 mag is not going to cause much tissue damage, a 223 will knock them stone cold dead and a 243/58 gr V max blows them off their feet as.... in overkill. Since I hate coyotes and think of them like I would a rat then there ain't no such thing as over kill. Blowing them off their feet or in half for that matter works for me.

  10. #10

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    Now THAT is hunting. Well done.

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    I figgered 22 mag to be marginal for Coyotees. In a "Rifle " its a lot more than 22 LR.

    Most of my meager cache of ammo, is Federal 50 grain bullets, and I've not seen any 22 mag ammo for, guess it's years now.

    I like the gun, but I'm loosing interest in the cartridge.

    Well, I sure got an interesting education on hunting the wilee coyotee.

    I needed that.

    Thanks
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    I figgered 22 mag to be marginal for Coyotees. In a "Rifle " its a lot more than 22 LR.

    Most of my meager cache of ammo, is Federal 50 grain bullets, and I've not seen any 22 mag ammo for, guess it's years now.

    I like the gun, but I'm loosing interest in the cartridge.

    Well, I sure got an interesting education on hunting the wilee coyotee.

    I needed that.

    Thanks
    Smitty of the North
    Smitty/BB for the most part our country side is divided into square miles with a road on each side of the square. Any glass that can see a mile is good enough. I can't see that method of hunting working in the great land. Cars drive up and down the gravel roads all day here-a-bouts and the coyotes ignore them for the most part. I bet if you drove a snow machine to within a mile of them up there they would be on alert.....unless you were in a way remote area where they didn't know what a snow machine was.


    Smitty, coyotes are territorial and they can be patterned to a certain extent. Finding a den that a salty old ***** is using year after year and you can kill most of a litter every year if you don't disturb them until close to mating season. When mating season gets close she runs the pups off so's she can go whoring. They are full grown but still not mature in the ways of their prey....me! I have killed several coyotes in the timbers by just sitting on a hillside watching a valley filled with game trails. Most of my tree stands are too close to the trail to use for coyote hunting. Sitting on a hillside watching the sun go down while watching nature getting it's chores chores done before dark is a treat anytime. Having a rifle across your lap just in case part of nature doing chores happens to be a coyote adds to it.

    There is only about a month where calling even works in this area. The crops have to be harvested so that you can see them coming and then once the pheasant hunters go afield the coyotes get a fast education on homo-sapians. A fella named Dusty Darah is the number one coyote caller in this area and he spends countless hours at it. He killed 1 coyote for every 23 set ups. The guys selling those calls make it sound like you can be sitting on the crapper playing with your new electronic caller and if you aren't real careful one of them coyotes is apt to ring your door bell looking for a dying raggit. Well it isn't so. Basically when you are in the field calling....if you are calling in birds of prey then you are doing it right. Only birds of prey don't circle you so they can use the wind to sniff the situation out, they just fly over for a look see.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Now THAT is hunting. Well done.
    And boy is it fun! It's the closest thing to sheep hunting that this old fart will ever do!

    Ole Butch hunted with a tricked out #1 in 22-250 for a few years. He made some long shots with it too.

    The longest coyote shots that I have ever witnessed were all accomplished by the same guy.....no it weren't me. A guy in our group who killed his first fox the year that I was born is the best of the best at shooting critters on the move. I watched him roll a fox off it's nest at just under a half mile with a 7mm mag. The most amazing running shot I ever witnessed was by the same guy. The boys on the radio were lining me up on a coyote that was headed my way. Perry yells Stop at the big oak tree in the fence line as the coyote is running right at it and should be popping over the hill where you can see him any second. When he came over the knob and into view he was still 800 yards out. I slipped out of the truck and leaned up against the oak tree and let him come. At about 500 yards out the coyote rolled end over end and then I hear the kerwhumph! I looked south to the gravel road and see jimmy pumping his fist. I got back in the truck picked up the mike and said Jimmy was that you what just ruined my fun...I was laughing. That was before range finders but I was splicing telephone cable back then so I had one of the those wheels with a clicker on it so I wheeled of the distance to something over 600 yards. It was a hope and a poke that defied the % that time. Jimmy made several other long shots back in those days. Some of them were with a 264 Win Mag and some with a 7mm Mag. The 7 mag was after he burned out the barrel in the 264.

    My longest running coyote shot is around 400 yards. It was after I had missed him three times at closer distance and was down to the last round in the gun. He was running full out when I swung through him and when I got about a 10 ft lead on him and a couple foot hold over I touched the trigger and he rolled. It's always way more fun to make one of those shots when you have a witness and I had two that day. I was shooting a 270 with 130 grain bullets way back then....it was the only rifle I had at the time.

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    You just made my day! Made me feel like I was right there beside you. Thanks!

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    I agree that there is no merit to drag a 22 mag out for an intentional coyote hunt - too many limitations... My vote goes to the 243/6mm/ 280 99% of the time... I have spotted a few coyotes here in the barren IL crop fields over the winter and its a 50-50 at best kill rate. A lot of times you can spot a male hanging around a hot female and he will let you slip into the 250 yard range if you have some cover...
    We developed a very high odds kill tactic using 2 hunters with shotguns for foxes but coyotes were a different story. We would split up and drive around from sun-up to about 11 AM on cold Jan days and spot red fox curled up sleeping in the worked fields. Then meet up and start after them one by one. One guy would drop the other off and then circle the sq mile section, park and start walking toward the other hunter. All this time you kept the fox in a line between both hunters. As you closed to withing 200 yards one would lay down while the other kept creeping in, that hunter would then lay down and the other would advance. Many times we got within 100 yards and sometimes less than 20! If the fox woke up the hunter he was looking at would start to run at the fox yelling like a crazy man and the other hunter dropped to the ground and waited. It was amazing how far you could "steer" a fox across a field - if he broke to a side you simply ran a few yards that way still yelling and it would turn the fox. We probably had close to a 90% kill rate and would get a few "doubles" each year also - great fun... Coyotes would not steer and would break out any direction they felt like... A 12 ga stuffed full of 3 in copper coated BB's was a deadly fox load...
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

  16. #16

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    Smokey has schkinned more coyoties than anyone I know. He catches a whole lot more of them by the tail than I shoot. I sure wish we was closer Smoke so you could learn me the right way to sucker them coyotes in to yer traps.

    I ain't kidding guys he sends me pictures all winter long . Only guy I know who could put out 6 traps one day and have 4 coyoties caught the next day. There is an art to it for sure.

    Our coyote hunting group has kind of fallen apart. Denny is 74, Jimmy is 68, Cal and Marion both died off a few years ago, Steve got unhitched and got into the sauce and looks pretty rough, Ole Butchy went to the retirement home and watches the history channel 24 hours a day when he isn't dozing off. Andy, Perry and I are the only ones that can track one any distance. This year we had some new guys join the group. None of them can hit squat with their machine guns. They don't understand what your telling them on the radio, they shoot those FMC bullets that skip on hard dirt like a rock on water and they don't care who's property they trespass on. Worsed of all is that they like to drink George Dickle while they are carrying loaded guns in their trucks. Not much that they do lines up with my thinking and thats another reason to go back to spot and stalk next year. I may find some young energetic guy that wants to learn the ropes. I don't mind hunting them alone but that ending up miles from the truck sucks. I have called my wife on my carry around phone what sends words all the way into outer space and then back to her purse. She usually ain't wearing her happy face when she gets to where I am and she really don't like it none if I'm dragging a coyote that is deader than dead and is leaking his go juice all over the place. I can usually make her laugh if I grab the coyotie by the upper and lower jaw and make him ask her for a ride.

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    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    Smokey has schkinned more coyoties than anyone I know. He catches a whole lot more of them by the tail than I shoot. I sure wish we was closer Smoke so you could learn me the right way to sucker them coyotes in to yer traps.

    I ain't kidding guys he sends me pictures all winter long . Only guy I know who could put out 6 traps one day and have 4 coyoties caught the next day. There is an art to it for sure.

    Our coyote hunting group has kind of fallen apart. Denny is 74, Jimmy is 68, Cal and Marion both died off a few years ago, Steve got unhitched and got into the sauce and looks pretty rough, Ole Butchy went to the retirement home and watches the history channel 24 hours a day when he isn't dozing off. Andy, Perry and I are the only ones that can track one any distance. This year we had some new guys join the group. None of them can hit squat with their machine guns. They don't understand what your telling them on the radio, they shoot those FMC bullets that skip on hard dirt like a rock on water and they don't care who's property they trespass on. Worsed of all is that they like to drink George Dickle while they are carrying loaded guns in their trucks. Not much that they do lines up with my thinking and thats another reason to go back to spot and stalk next year. I may find some young energetic guy that wants to learn the ropes. I don't mind hunting them alone but that ending up miles from the truck sucks. I have called my wife on my carry around phone what sends words all the way into outer space and then back to her purse. She usually ain't wearing her happy face when she gets to where I am and she really don't like it none if I'm dragging a coyote that is deader than dead and is leaking his go juice all over the place. I can usually make her laugh if I grab the coyotie by the upper and lower jaw and make him ask her for a ride.
    Thanks for the laugh. That is mighty good.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    I am starting to think that the trade winds from Colorado is a blow'n in too much smoke??? If'n your buying 25 lb bags of Doritos then its time we look into this further...
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Smokey View Post
    I am starting to think that the trade winds from Colorado is a blow'n in too much smoke??? If'n your buying 25 lb bags of Doritos then its time we look into this further...
    Wind's been out of the south for days and I don't like Doritos.......Ruffles have Ridges....they don't come in 25lb bags do they?

    Boy Smokey you should see my living room right now? Sheesh the little lady is on spring break and is in Des Moines baby sitting. I got this way bright idear last night about putting scope bases on that bolt action 20 gauge New Haven that I bought a short once upon a time ago. I had a set of bases that was for a TC of some sort....musket loader I'm thinking. Anyway they fit the contour of the top of that scattergun like they was done up just for it. These bases have but one beeg 1/4" hole in the middle of each base. I had a some 1/4 x28 short hard bolts that fell off my Harley Davidson years ago. They were too long but I know how to fix that. I figured once they are snugged down good they ain't going nowhere. I just so happened to have a new carbide tap in that flavor and the puter told me that it needed a number three drill (7/32) for the pilot hole. I had one of them that had never made a hole in nothin so I was set. All I needed was to snap a chalk line down middlest part the barrel and git after it. Now understand that my screw driver turning, drill holding, nail pounding, writing my name hand just got operated on and still don't like to squeeze stuff much. My son has my drill press at his house.......see where this is going? I'bout drilled a hole in my Johnson right off the bat. So I got me a punch and made some divites so the drill bit wouldn't scribble all over the top of the gun. Perfect, the holes are drilled and they are in the middle. You know how when your cutting threads and its good to have some cutting oil of some sort? WD 40 is way too runny and don't work much. I got the first hole tapped just fine. I cut the screw off and filed the end flat and put the front base on. Man this going purdy good. About half way through tapping the second hole my tap was making that scarey chattering noise when I turned it like it was getting tired. Well my coffee sipping hand was hurting from the Dr's knife and now me asking too much form it so I tried to become ambidexterous. Turning that tap with my left hand? I was stupid to even try it. I busted that tap of below flush in the hole. Uh huh.....I hope that new air purifying machine that the wife bought don't catch dirty words floating around in the air cuz when she cleans it out she's gone make me go to church twice next sunday. It was midnight 30 when I finally got that tap outta the hole. Moms good snuggling up in and reading a book comforter is laying on the floor covered with every tool you can think of that one's imagination might cause him to drag in the house to help get that tap un stuck. Metal shavings all over her favorite blanky and WD40 too. I got to go the hardware store and get another tap and then to Wally World to get another blanky. I gots to have that mess all cleaned up afore she gets home tonight or EKC won't never be able to make another post on this forum cuz he'll be dead or badly maimed.....and I ain't kiddin!!!!!!!

  20. #20

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    I watched a show on TV years ago where a real successful coyote hunter was being interviewed. He recommended using what ever your favorite deer rifle was. His reason was all the great practice with your favorite deer rifle would help your shooting during deer season. I think my LaRue Tactical AR 5.56 would be what I would take if I wanted to hunt them in Alaska, or my 30-06. I can just see me sitting around here on the Kenai with a coyote call and having some brown bear come in to check it out. I know, they are in the den in the winter, but not always!

    I think I could kill coyotes all day long with a .22 mag. hollow point, if I was under 100 yards and shooting broad side shots at a stationary coyote. But, I would not see it as my coyote round.

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