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Thread: Protecting boat while at cabin?

  1. #1
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    Default Protecting boat while at cabin?

    Anyone have a good idea about protecting a boat while staying at remote cabin? I'm thinking of some sort of rail system to winch it out of the water? Just curious what others have come up with. The area of the cabin is pretty exposed to the wind and kinda rocky shore. Hate the though of a wind storm coming up and thrashing my boat on the rocks all night.

    Thanks

  2. #2

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    Describe your boat for us.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by BrownBear View Post
    Describe your boat for us.
    Wooldridge AK II

  4. #4
    Member Sobie2's Avatar
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    Black ABS pipe in 6' lengths and use it for rollers then get a Lewis winch or Capstan winch. Or put in an outhaul at the cabin if it is your own place and pull your boat in as high as you can at high tide, then let her go dry.

    Or go crazy and do a full UHMW bottom and winch it above the high tide line and then slide her downhill like a sled when putting her back in the water.

    If it is your own cabin you could hire a big landing craft and bring truck out and trailer your boat in and out of the water. Here in Southeast AK a few people do this.

    Sobie2

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    Set your (big) anchor on the bow with the proper amount of anchor chain/line deployed. Tie a long line to the anchor. Push the boat off shore. When it is out a desirable distance, pull on the line that you have in your hand, yanking the anchor off the bow. When you need the boat again, drag the anchor, and the boat back to shore with the line that is tied to the anchor.
    Or anchor off shore and use a dingy to get to shore.
    You can cut a pole of sufficient length. Hitch a line on it, starting at what will be the bottom. Buoy at the other end. Pound the pole into the lake bottom. You can rig a block on it with a line looped to shore. Run the boat to shore. Hook to your looped line. Pull the line till your boat is out near where you pounded the pole in. When you want to retrieve the boat just pull it back in. I've done all of these.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  6. #6

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    Three point 'running line' with a big Danforth. This is only if you have a good holding bottom. It's a simple solution that is used all over Alaska. I had one for years in Halibut Cove and one of the gnarliest locations there still uses one.

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    Attach this
    http://www.amazon.com/Greenfield-AB4.../dp/B003BM5LUI

    To your anchor line, run bow line to shore and allow anchor buddy to pull your boat back out to deeper water, then tie your bow line to tree or something. In the morning, pull the bowline, bringing your boat to shore, board, then allow the anchor buddy to pull you back out again. Pull anchor, start motor, have a nice day.
    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ

  8. #8

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAGgOcM4STo

    You do not need two anchors as shown in this vid although it would be more secure, obviously, in severe weather and there are other knots to secure boat to line. If you don't expect a lot of company you can have a dropper loop that's more permanent and more secure than the hitch shown in vid.

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    Outhaul or mooring if it's your place and a temporary outhaul even if it's not. Or a solid anchor and a dingy/inflatable. Shoving the boat out and pulling the anchor off the bow is fine for picnics. But I like to "set" the anchor with the boats propulsion. Out hauls work great I use them for overnighting and even for just full days of hunting. You need a good anchor, a buoy, a pulley, and a lot of line. I like to have 300 ft. https://docs.google.com/viewer?url=p.../US6651577.pdf

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by copperlake View Post
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uAGgOcM4STo

    You do not need two anchors as shown in this vid although it would be more secure, obviously, in severe weather and there are other knots to secure boat to line. If you don't expect a lot of company you can have a dropper loop that's more permanent and more secure than the hitch shown in vid.


    Hadn't watched the video (which is excellent) before my first post. On my families permanent set up we used an engine block for an anchor and used a stainless beaner at the end of the boats bowline to clip into a permanent loop knot on the out hauls mainline. For temporary set ups for Lunds I've gone as simple as running the line through the eye of a boom chain tying one end to the bow to pull the skiff out and the other end of the line to the stern to retrieve the skiff or a sphere ate line all together. Then just secured the line or lines to something above the high tide line, either a tree or rock typically. Obviously for the wooly something a little stouter than that last set up would be better, something more like the one in the video. Point being, the outhaul is a very versatile and effective setup that is fairly quick to put in place.

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