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Thread: Sheep Hunting...looking for secrets!

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    Default Sheep Hunting...looking for secrets!

    Ok ok ok...not those secrets.
    I'm planning a sheep hunt for this fall and it'll be my first. I'm curious if people have gear suggestions, maybe something away from the norm or maybe a piece of gear you have wished you had, or one that go you out of a jamb, that one piece of stuff that turned out to be the difference between success and failure. Thanks in advance.

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    Member chapman8523's Avatar
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    My top two would be boots and a quality tent. Nothing feels better than sitting through days of blowing rain and snow and not have any weather make its way into the tent. Being warm and dry is a big thing. Boots, well that's self explanatory. Without a good set that fit you comfortably you probably won't make it that far.

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    Member 0321Tony's Avatar
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    One thing I take with me weather it's on a sheep hunt or boating, I always have my Delorme with me. It's nice to be able to keep in touch with the wife and since I do a lot of stuff solo it's a piece of mind for her

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    Member acelia8912's Avatar
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    Well getting the best quality gear is always a must. I don't know what you already have for gear so it's kind of shooting in the dark to tell you something you may not have. Planning and mindset is what it boils down to for the most part. You can always work around today's modern gear. I always like to think back to the old time when they didn't have half our gear,optics,clothing, or dehydrated foods. The went in heavier than us and with less!


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    Sponsor protaxidermy's Avatar
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    Second pair of light weight hiking boots.

    We hunted for 4 days in wet boots. It rained so hard that the water ran down our pants into our boots. That SUCKED.

    Plus it is GREAT to be able to take off you boots to let you feet cool & walk around in another comfortable boot or shoe.


    Absolutely my SAT PHONE.

    I fell & tore a groin muscle ( REALLY BAD) & damaged some other stuff 2 years ago & had to call for the plane opening morning.

    That was 7 days before the pilot was contracted to pick me up so that might have effected a lot about how I healed up.

    Also after that I do NOT hunt sheep by my self.

    RJ Simington
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    Custom Taxidermy, Experience the difference !!

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Stubai axe/ hiking pole from Wiggy's Alaska and crampons.


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    You want the secrets he you go. Take the things that are going to keep you comfortable in the field. If you are not comfortable you will not be productive. Simple things. Broth cubes; I carry my stove at all times. Nothing like sitting in the cold snowy rain all day waiting on a sheep, imagine a cup of hot broth and what it does to your body and mind in that weather. Sleeping pad; everyone try's to save weight with those air things. My sleeping pad goes everywhere with me. I use that ribbed thermorest type and when laying in the rocks spotting sheep I lay comfortably. A book; sheep hunting weather can be bad. Imagine laying in the tent for 5 days counting fabric squares(I've done 8 days of it). Now imagine coffee and a book. Ice axe; you can keep those crappy pole type things, every one I tried I broke. Imagine setting a tent on the rocky side of a hill, now imagine being able to
    Dig out a flat spot. A good tent; again stop trying to save weight on a tent that won't protect you from the extreme elements. My tent is my home.
    Too many get caught up reading silly books and keyboard cowboy posts. Use quality gear and be comfortable it will pay great dividends in the field.

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    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by akrstabout View Post
    Stubai axe/ hiking pole from Wiggy's Alaska and crampons.


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    do they still make those stubai telescopic ice axes? I know Petzl quit making theirs and I haven't been able to find one of the stubai' for ever.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
    "Swans are a gift" -DucksandDogs
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    Member Antleridge's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by duckslayer56 View Post
    do they still make those stubai telescopic ice axes? I know Petzl quit making theirs and I haven't been able to find one of the stubai' for ever.
    Bought one on Amazon a month or so ago.

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    Quote Originally Posted by duckslayer56 View Post
    do they still make those stubai telescopic ice axes? I know Petzl quit making theirs and I haven't been able to find one of the stubai' for ever.
    Mine almost made it one season before it broke. In principle, they are great, in practice, I have found them less than durable.

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    Kuiu has some very good quality

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by duckslayer56 View Post
    do they still make those stubai telescopic ice axes? I know Petzl quit making theirs and I haven't been able to find one of the stubai' for ever.
    If in anchorage, Wiggy's Ak has them. I have had zero issues w mine and take it everywhere and use it hard. Love that thing! It handles like a cane, easier to lean on it in the steep stuff, wrists will thank ya. More then once it has kept me from falling. The wide blade part fits your palm of your hands. Either end can b used to arrest a fall. The serrated end grabs tundra or rocks perfectly while accending


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    Quote Originally Posted by akrstabout View Post
    If in anchorage, Wiggy's Ak has them. I have had zero issues w mine and take it everywhere and use it hard. Love that thing! It handles like a cane, easier to lean on it in the steep stuff, wrists will thank ya. More then once it has kept me from falling. The wide blade part fits your palm of your hands. Either end can b used to arrest a fall. The serrated end grabs tundra or rocks perfectly while accending


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    I have to agree with akrstabout. My Petzl has been on a lotta hikes and mountain hunts. I am gentle when I put a lot of weight on it though because I have it extended out to its max length. ...and it is still slightly shorter than my long frame would prefer.

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    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    I've wanted one for a while, just never been able to find one. I'll check out Amazon and see if they still carry them. I'll be up in anchorage in Sept, if I don't find one by then I'll swing by Wiggys and see if Mark still has them in stock.

    As as to the original question (sorry about the side track) I think a small bar of soap is a good thing to have. Grab one of those little ones from a hotel or something. A lot of guys will tough through it, but getting a clean undercarriage for me helps me stay on the mountain. A bad case of monkey butt sucks during a week or longer trip, and it makes me feel a lot better after washing off 3 days of sweat, grime, etc.

    Another item I like to bring is a set of crocks, taking my boots off at the end of the day and slipping those crocks on feels great. My feet thank me for it.

    A a puffy jacket is another thing that's a must have for me. I've been using the kuiu spindrift for years and it's been great. I finally sprung for one of the kuiu super down jackets when they were on sale, and I'm sold on them. I wore it this winter in my tree stand, and I was impressed. Kept me nice and toasty in some pretty cold weather, and it weighs next to nothing.

    i also smoke up a bunch of red salmon to take with me on sheep hunts. Sure it's a bit heavier, but nutritionally you won't find much better for its weight. It's got omega threes to help with joint pain, high fat, and protein to keep your energy up, and the protein helps prevents muscle loss. I'll usually vacuum seal a few packages to throw in my pack. It also breaks up the monotony of mountain house.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
    "Swans are a gift" -DucksandDogs
    I am a shoveler's worst nightmare!

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Something I started two years ago, that's not a bring along, but a field forage, is labrador tea. I'm not sure, but the high alpine dwarf type seemed more potent than the bigger lowland type. Just pull some leaves and steep them in boiling water a few minutes. After its cool enough drink 'er down. Delicious, and is a great restorative for soreness and tired muscles. There are a lot of claims made about it, if you do a bit of google searching, and I can't attest to many, but I was amazed how I felt after my first cup of it. One caution; drink it during the day, not before bed. Might prevent sleep.

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    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Thumbs up on Bear's post. Stove and tea, coffee and hot chocolate packs for me. Also some top ramen. It can get awful cold on the mountain, even when the day starts out nice. Not just a comfort item, but it can save a life by halting and preventing hypothermia.

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Smoked salmon is huge!! Nothing fires your body up like salmon.
    Magic juice, I take a gallon ziploc bag of the stuff. Soooo worth the weight. It's actually called shaklee performance. But my clients made fun of me packing it around, till I shared it with them. They named it magic juice.
    Puffy coat as well. Awesome.
    I use a walking axe, 110cm. Can't find them anymore. But I've seen a lot of trekking pokes fold in half. No thanks.
    Crocs are very nice as well.

    Basicly there's a lot of stuff that's nice. If the weight scares you your probably not in sheep shape yet.. I figure out what i WANT on my hunt and just make sure I'm in good enough shape for it.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
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    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Have a warm cozy shelter to come back to.




    Little drink to enjoy after a hard day.




    Did I mention a warm shelter?




    Good food.




    Having a wife to share the pain.........




    Having a wife that shares your passion and can shoot straight.

    "I refuse to let the things I can't do stop me from doing the things I can"
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    Member duckslayer56's Avatar
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    I need to eventually get one of those tipis, my arctic oven is just a bit heavy to pack around.
    Some people call it sky busting... I call it optimism
    "Swans are a gift" -DucksandDogs
    I am a shoveler's worst nightmare!

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    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    I love my 1# air pad. Rolls up the size of a Nalgene bottle. See thru orange w foil layer inside. Yes they are spendy but less bulk, easy to pack n so comfy. Full length too, not the half body shorty one.


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