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Thread: The good the bad and the ugly on kifaru tipis

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    Default The good the bad and the ugly on kifaru tipis

    Any experience with kifaru tipis and titanium pack stoves? Thank you in advance.

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    The biggest negative I have is they rely 100% on your stakes. If the ground is questable there is a risk of loseing your shelter. Other than that I really enjoy mine. Especially with the wood stove.

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    Thank you..

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    Quote Originally Posted by MRC Alaska View Post
    Any experience with kifaru tipis and titanium pack stoves? Thank you in advance.
    Which model or models are you looking at?
    Tomorrow isn't promised. "Never delay kissing a pretty girl or opening a bottle of whiskey." E. Hemingway

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    There is a really great thread on here that went on for a few years comparing the Kifaru and Seek Outside tipis. I do not know how to make a link to it, but you should be able to find it with a search. I do not own a tipi yet, but have been doing a lot of research on them as I plan to add one to my toy box before this fall.

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    I've used the 12 man Kifaru and Four Dog Titanium Stove for 12 years on Geezer Ridge. I tried the collapsible stove first but wood consumption was extreme with short burn times. As stated above, this is not a free standing tent and the staking technique is important. There will be condensation in the morning but a few minutes of fire and all is well again. IIRC total weight for stove/pipe/tent is about 20 pounds so it's part of our Super Cub gear load. Any other type of tent would greatly increase this weight.

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    Ditto to what Vern said. Love the tipi for the weight savings. Also useful in the winter for putting up over your snowmachine and making it easier and warmer to work on your machine.

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    Possibly the 6 man. mjm316

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    Mrc
    Don't go smaller than 8 man. You will lose the big benefit of the Tipi and that is walk around room / head room.
    Just my opinion.

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    Quote Originally Posted by polardds View Post
    Ditto to what Vern said. Love the tipi for the weight savings. Also useful in the winter for putting up over your snowmachine and making it easier and warmer to work on your machine.
    Good idea Polar...........I gotta remember that one!
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by budman5 View Post
    Mrc
    Don't go smaller than 8 man. You will lose the big benefit of the Tipi and that is walk around room / head room.
    Just my opinion.
    +1 on this. I'm with Hoss in that I don't own a tipi yet, but plan to. With a bigger tipi you can always pitch it smaller. By getting a big one that has tie-downs midway you can pitch it smaller when the need calls for it. Can't make a small one bigger though.

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    As Bud says.....don't go small....I started there and quickly traded up......8 man for two guys......12 man is perfect for 3 or 4.....when we had 5 hunters, we added another sleeping tent

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    Quote Originally Posted by ChugiakTinkerer View Post
    +1 on this. I'm with Hoss in that I don't own a tipi yet, but plan to. With a bigger tipi you can always pitch it smaller. By getting a big one that has tie-downs midway you can pitch it smaller when the need calls for it. Can't make a small one bigger though.
    This isn't really possible. What makes the tipi effective with winds is a tight fabric. The tipi cannot be pitched correctly with the tie downs alone. IMO I won't say it's impossible but there is a good chance you will lose your shelter if a strong wind comes up.

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    I had never heard of pitching smaller and I think it would be very difficult with Kifaru.

    Another thought......as we dream of larger tipis, it is sometimes difficult to find an area large enough to for the foot print of a large tipi.....my 12 man require about a 20 foot diameter circle which isn't always easy to find out in the tundra.

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    Like Vern I started with the 12 man. I did a lot of river floats at the time and found it hard to find a spot large enough to pitch the tent.
    The 12 man is a beauty though, it can stand a lot of wind.
    I settled on the 8 man and have been happy with it. Look for tipi with 8 foot of head room, some differ.

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    I think Chugiak is referring to the "flex pitch" that Seek Outside offers. According to the other thread I was referring to earlier the seek outside tipis can be pitched smaller using some anchor points a little ways up from the bottom just as Chugiak is describing. As a result of this feature and a few others I am going to purchase the seek outside when I pull the trigger on one. Unless of course I come across a used one in another brand.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hoss View Post
    I think Chugiak is referring to the "flex pitch" that Seek Outside offers. According to the other thread I was referring to earlier the seek outside tipis can be pitched smaller using some anchor points a little ways up from the bottom just as Chugiak is describing. As a result of this feature and a few others I am going to purchase the seek outside when I pull the trigger on one. Unless of course I come across a used one in another brand.
    That must be what I'm thinking of. I took it for granted that this capability existed on all brands. Even if other models can't be safely pitched smaller it's seems like bigger is almost always better.

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    I own 2 Kifaru tipis: a Sawtooth and an 8-Man. For extended base camp hunting and 2 or 3 guys the 8-Man is the way to go. It's way too big for one man unless you simply have no weight concerns. The Sawtooth is a big home for one man and easily capable of handling 2 guys. I believe you could sleep 3 or 4 in it in a real pinch, but not comfortably for me.

    I would never take a tipi (requiring 10+ stakes) on any mobile trip, as they simply take too much time and effort to pitch, plus they are very site-dependent. Staking is critical, and I now require the use of MSR Hurricane stakes on mine. In heavy wind I don't even think about it: I put a sizeable rock on top of every single stake. A 2-day relentless wind can slowly uproot stakes and suddenly you've got a big problem in the night.

    I'd love to have a 4 Dog ti stove but they still weigh too much and are too bulky for my preferences. I like the TiGoat Wifi stove with a 3" ti pipe. None of the ul takedown stoves have prolonged burn times when the fuel is softwood like pine, aspen, poplar or birch. Hardwood might make a difference, but there is none where I'm hunting/camping.

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    I have a Kifaru 8 man. I'm sort of lost as to why anyone would want to reduce the size by using tie downs on the tipi seams. It sort of cancels out the reason for having a shelter that allows you to stand up in it. If you'll be using it in warmer weather, invest in a liner. Using a stove in one of these will REALLY heat things up. It has to be experienced to be believed. The liners in a Kifaru are a PITA. I only take my liner out when I reseal the seams.

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    Member Ernie Scar's Avatar
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    Just bought an 8 man Kifaru this morning, it's good to see there aren't strong negative reports.

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