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Thread: Any dory boat owners? Info needed

  1. #1
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    Default Any dory boat owners? Info needed

    I've been lurking here for awhile, the place is full of good info. Retirement is around the corner and for years I have wanted a flat bottom dory that would be as versatile as it would be comfortable. The issue is the old harveys are old and most need a lot of work. I am not a wood boat kinda guy so I was pretty much left in the dark on my dream of having one. A few weeks ago, I got a call from my brother in Oregon and he said there is a company that makes a full composite dory down there in Oregon. After looking over there website, I am ready to pull the trigger but would love to hear from some of you guys that run these flat bottom boats up here. I understand windchop will make things rough, but I'm in no hurry to get anywhere. My goal is to run rivers, ocean and bays. This is a 22 high side vessel. I'm not sure if I can post the website so I didn't. Would love to hear from you guys running dorys or have in the past. Thanks in advance

  2. #2
    Member KantishnaCabin's Avatar
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    I owned a 22ft Sea Dory for several years and used the heck out of it when I lived in Kodiak and also when I moved to Juneau. While it can be a kidney buster of a boat if you try and tackle 3ft chop head on and full throttle, it can also be a very stable and forgiving hull. As long as you are not in a huge hurry and you learn to quarter the oncoming chop it is an extremely stable platform while under power. That being said, it is a cork of a boat when at anchor. If you have guests on board that suffer from motion sickness you better stock up on sea sickness pills. They list heavily when you move about the boat. Especially when you are boarding a big halibut or pulling pots and you have more than one person on the rail. They are very nice for getting in close to shore though and they are extremely economical to run. On balance, it was one of my favorite boats and I wouldn't hesitate to own another.

  3. #3
    Member JR2's Avatar
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    That boat from Oregon is a copy of a Harvey for sure. Cool boat as long as you realize the limits of a flat bottom boat. As a former Harvey owner I can tell you they pound in the chop if you push the speed.
    2007 Kingfisher 2825 - Stor Fisk

    Civilization ends at the waterline. Beyond that, we all enter the food chain, and not always right at the top. -- Hunter S. Thompson

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    Thanks guys, the flat bottom will give me some versatility and that particular boat has Kevlar on the bottom, so I'm thinking I could run it easily on the beach. I guess when those were designed, the owner of the company fished a Harvey for years and he loved the look. The only thing Harvey about it is the lapstrakes, everything else has been redesigned and all wood has been removed. Not a stitch of wood in them, I'm thinking that makes them very good for up here. Being a glass guy, i don't think I have many other options. How do these flat bottoms handle in big seas?

  5. #5
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    Any boat can take more then the person in it. You have to drive the boat and not let the water push you around! If you let a wave push you you will surf. If you let it push you to port or starboard you can end up in trouble. If you can out run the wave good, if not you have to let it roll under you then jump on the back and ride it. That is why they were great for the Picific City Dory fleet. That is what they are made for, a sandy beach! If they have gelcoat on the bottom, rocks will remove it. Kevlar is great stuff, but if the resine is crushed on rocks you still get a soft spot thay has to get fixed. I have had to cut out bad spots and do repairs. It just takes more time and as we know with boats time is money!

  6. #6
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    I have two Harvey's, a 22' and a 20', and they are the best boats I've ever owned. Last spring I spent 14 hours in 8' seas in the 22' and it handled great, just wasn't much fun after awhile. In either of them you need to slow down when things start getting rough, but I wouldn't trade them for anything.

  7. #7
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    I had a 20' Harvey back in the 70's (it was a '76 model I believe since it had patriotic red, white and blue coloring for the bi-centennial, pretty distinctive). I ran it off Deep Creek before the tractor launch started up and out of Homer. My young son called it the bumpy boat to give you an idea of comfort level. Coming back in after the day breeze kicked in was a slow slog. Any kind of chop was jarring and I was constantly redoing the seat fastening to the hull sides as it came loose in the chop. I don't think my old bones could take it anymore, especially since I now boat out of Seward, well known for it's afternoon chop. I'm thankful for a deep v hull that rides much better in that stuff. The dory will do well on the rivers but it all depends on where you want to fish the oceans and bays up here. PWS would likely be OK except for the days the Whittier winds are blowing. K Bay and Seward not so good unless you limit yourself to good days and get back in before the chop comes up.

  8. #8
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    I ran a 22' Harvey with stand-up cabin out of Homer for 15 years. Sold it to my neighbor and it is still running around the bay. Many trips out to Port Chatham, just working with the weather. Beach-able is a big plus. They don't require an excess of power and ride high in the water...think cork.

  9. #9

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    Would the subject happen to be a Breaker Dory? If so, they look to be skookum. As many have commented here you can (and will) pound your liver out in a chop, especially driving from the bow, but that a Breaker 21'3" weighs 1200 # bare, one can have a much lower HP need and really scoot in calms for the flat bottom. A flat bottom is the most efficient planing hull there is as well as being (all things considered) the most stable, at rest at least. Rough weather cuts HP needs substantially! The very first Tolmann was flat and it didn't take Renn long to transition, for whatever that might be worth. My first boat was a plywood 16' codfish dory that could only support 10hp max and I had many memorable adventures in that old slab. No matter what, you will have fun because it sounds like you have the time to!

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    Hi guys, thanks for the positive response. I had some time this weekend to talk with the owner of the breaker dory company. He tells me every boat is hand laid using vinylester resins, Kevlar bottoms, coring material where needed and not a stitch of wood anywhere in the boat. You can take a splitting ax to the bottom of the boat and it won't puncture. He has video of this testing it against a aluminum boat vs the breaker dory. The boAts run anywhere from a 50 hp to 115 hp depending on your need. He would love to get a few of these up here in Alaska and is making me a deal and the next person that buys one. I am pretty excited! I need to decide on a color, I'm thinking red top, white hull, I don't know though. Looking at Suzuki or evinrude for power, still undecided. Comming here pretty much helped me make up my mind, I wanted a versatile vessel and this looks like it will be a great fit for me. I will have many more questions. I'm still undecided about a built in bait station or not and how I want the cabin setup.

  11. #11

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    alaskan, don't fall for the charade of materials comparison. NO plastic boat will outperform a metal boat when it comes to abrasion on a thickness-to-thickness basis. If I lived in Florida I'd have a plastic boat, but I live in Kachemak Bay.....

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