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Thread: Family hunt this year!

  1. #1
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    Default Family hunt this year!

    So much to sher grin of my long time hunting partner I'm thinking of buying a ranger and a Cabela's Ultimate Alaknak™ Tent – 12' x 12' and bringing my parents, wife and 2 yr old daughter on our caribou then moose hunt this year. Looking for lessons learned on hunting with the family. And maybe a new hunting partner

  2. #2
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    The best hunting partner that I had/have is the wife. While there are things she will not do, hike over the next ridge to see what might be there, she has no problems with other aspects of hunting. The most important lesson I learned was to ensure that she had clothing as good, if not better then mine. As long as she was somewhat comfortable all was fine.
    While the Range is a good machine, I would not want to be out with only one machine. Is some others going to be along? If not you might look into a second machine. The last thing you want is to be broken down several miles back with the wife and child and no way to safely get them out.
    I am sure that others will join this thread and offer ore, if not better advise. You also might want to take a couple 'shake down' trips during the summer to see how things go.
    Good luck and have fun.

  3. #3
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    I've introduced my wife and two daughters to hunting. One daughter when she was about four. My advice is to expect to hunt less and teach/introduce more. My level of effort and intensity really took a back seat for the first few years. I spent most of my effort to ensuring they were having fun, were warm, dry and happy (not to mention well fed). It was a change, but was well worth the effort. Now they are all pretty successful hunters, and are my main hunting partners.

  4. #4
    Member 4merguide's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DAllen View Post
    I've introduced my wife and two daughters to hunting. One daughter when she was about four. My advice is to expect to hunt less and teach/introduce more. My level of effort and intensity really took a back seat for the first few years. I spent most of my effort to ensuring they were having fun, were warm, dry and happy (not to mention well fed). It was a change, but was well worth the effort. Now they are all pretty successful hunters, and are my main hunting partners.
    Excellent...!!!
    Sheep hunting...... the pain goes away, but the stupidity remains...!!!

  5. #5
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    I love rolling family style... yeah, you have to dial back the intensity but hunting with the family is just great times all the way around. I might have to take it a little easier, but with the family along I can stay out twice as long.

    I went to an Arctic Oven with a stove and eventually a quasi camper- having a warm, dry place is paramount when the family is along.
    "I do not deal in hypotheticals. The world, as it is, is vexing enough..." Col. Stonehill, True Grit

  6. #6
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    Thanks for the input. As to Bearcats question the grandparents are going to get a ranger as well. We have a remote place out of seward so the wife is used to roughing it and has all the appropriate gear. Just gave me pause taking the family hunting as far as noise levels, ability to access. Been hunting out of a raft and on foot for a while just a change and figured this would be an appropriate fourm to gather a ton of info. Maybe skip a few mistakes

  7. #7

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    Like many when I was a kid camp was what ever fit in a pack or the old 4 - wheel drive truck. For several years my wife, 2 daughters and me hunted together. Watching the girls as they "got their" first caribou, moose and black bears was a memorable time for all of us. I invested considerable time, money, planning and energy into these hunts and it paid off.

    ATV's have made hauling in and packing out a camp easier and a good light weight wall tent with out a sewn in floor, wood stove and cots made the stay much more enjoyable. Keeping the girls, especially children and elderly safe was always the #1 priority.

    We always started and ended our day with prayer to our Creator.

    Allow as much time as possible, we liked 10 days.

    Make it a fun camping trip with hunting mixed in.

    Figure out as convenient a bathroom as possible for women and children as going out side when it is dark is "not their thing"!

    Keep them warm and dry and in warm and dry clothes.

    Get plenty of rest and know when to sleep in.

    Fold up chairs, table and a propane cooking stove make tent life better.

    Bring easy to cook food and frozen prepped meals. Snacks, tons of snacks!

    I hang an LED lantern out side and kept one in the tent on low power and left it on all night.

    Bears, never had a problem in a tent, but I do tell everyone if we do to hug the ground, plug their ears and sing loudly!

    We all learn some thing each trip. Have lots of fun and "never use a gut pile to measure the success of a trip".

  8. #8
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    Like many when I was a kid camp was what ever fit in a pack or the old 4 - wheel drive truck. For several years my wife, 2 daughters and me hunted together. Watching the girls as they "got their" first caribou, moose and black bears was a memorable time for all of us. I invested considerable time, money, planning and energy into these hunts and it paid off.

    ATV's have made hauling in and packing out a camp easier and a good light weight wall tent with out a sewn in floor, wood stove and cots made the stay much more enjoyable. Keeping the girls, especially children and elderly safe was always the #1 priority.

    We always started and ended our day with prayer to our Creator.

    Allow as much time as possible, we liked 10 days.

    Make it a fun camping trip with hunting mixed in.

    Figure out as convenient a bathroom as possible for women and children as going out side when it is dark is "not their thing"!

    Keep them warm and dry and in warm and dry clothes.

    Get plenty of rest and know when to sleep in.

    Fold up chairs, table and a propane cooking stove make tent life better.

    Bring easy to cook food and frozen prepped meals. Snacks, tons of snacks!

    I hang an LED lantern out side and kept one in the tent on low power and left it on all night.

    Bears, never had a problem in a tent, but I do tell everyone if we do to hug the ground, plug their ears and sing loudly!

    We all learn some thing each trip. Have lots of fun and "never use a gut pile to measure the success of a trip".
    Cant rep ya again yet, but you pretty much nailed it 338.
    Hunting with your family is rewarding in so many ways, keep them happy and enjoy the experience.
    Bk
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  9. #9
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    The Alaknak tent gets some negative reviews for wind and condensation, I have the 12 x 12 and with proper setup (ie long tent stake out)the wind was not an issue. I also added 2 ft dog tie to each corner for insurance. I use wood for heat so the condensation was not bad, as long as you breathe in there there will be moisture. A lot of folks are hooked on Propane heaters & I suspect that is their moisture issue.
    mr

  10. #10

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    I could never get all the mud and crud swept out of a tent so I prefer wall tents with out floors as rolling up mud and crud in a tent eventually gets it on the walls and ceiling. A pair of rubber bottom slip on camp shoes is a must have item for wall tent hunts. Montana Tent and Canvas makes tents out of a very durable and light weight material called "Relite" and it is available in white, tan and green. It does not breath as well as canvas so open widows and propane use go hand in hand. But, compared to canvas it is over twice as light and more tear an mildew resistant.

    I sold my 12x17 Realite tent a few months ago and I am having them make me up a "custom" 10x12 out of Relite. It will have no floor, tan walls, white roof and green fly. Also, 3' windows on 3 sides and screened zippered door with tie shut options. On average Relite is 65% lighter then canvas. I am thinking about building my own frame. The frames they sell are first class, but bigger then needed for a 10x12 Relite tent. An internal frame and tie downs make the wall tent very stable.

    I still have my original Alaknak Relite 12x12 tent with 3' side walls and a center pole with 4 corner poles. I think the tent and fly weigh under 25 lbs. and I have used it for about 20 years. It is not designed for real high winds, but does great tucked in the timber. I don't plan on ever being with out a wall tent and they are a back up emergency shelter. I didn't pay much mind to rocks and tree roots when I was younger, but at my age I like cots for me and my wife.

    I spent 9 weeks in a 8x10 canvas wall tent in the mid 70's when I worked for a placer mining company and 4 weeks in my 12x17 wall tent on an extended hunting trip. Those are my longest uninterrupted wall tent stays. Waking up warm and dry with a good nights sleep made the whole experience enjoyable. Many old time American homesteaders lived in wall tents while building their homes.

    No tent works best for all hunts. Back pack hunts and fly in hunts dictate small, light weight and wind resistant tents.
    For comfortable family camping a wall tent is the next best thing to a cabin, but packing it in requires a boat or some other mechanized vehicle.

    The Arctic Oven tents look great and I hear they can stand up to high winds. If I ever get one it will probably be the 10x12. I'm just not fond of floors in tents for my use, but I know they serve a purpose for some tents and hunts.

    I take it for granted that we all agree a tent should not leak!

  11. #11
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    i guess i'm different....lol i want it to be intense, difficult, uncomfortable and successfull. i try to show my kids that sometimes working hard for something good takes sacrifice and a little down and dirty effort. at night we can be warm and poop on a toilet chair but when its hunting time i try to show my kids what it takes to get food in the freezer. but they are 11 and 12 now so i'm past the lets just have fun stage...i'm at the lets have a family hug over a steamy gut pile stage.
    my wife hates being cold and wet, her favorite hunt is kodiak deer...go figure. but she saw that putting uncomfortable effort in gives a unexplainable satisifaction sitting in that warm tent at night with a hot meal. but she views a hunt as an investment, putting out money had better show some return..ie freezer full of meat. for kicks and giggles we would go camp. but i was raised that hunting is too important for the livelyhood of the family to just go out and screw around (thats what camping is for lol). i understand its not like that for everyone though.
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