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Thread: Continental engines

  1. #1
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    Default Continental engines

    Looking for feedback on Continental engines...in particular. 0470j. The good and the bad...reliability...etc.

  2. #2
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    Just a bit slow in reaching full power, but otherwise an excellent engine.

  3. #3
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    Go to skywagons.org. There has been a recent discussion on the J model.


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    Thanks for the info. I am.not a.pilot...but have a chance to buy an interest in a plane with this engine. It would get limited use..and sit silent alot of the time. I read alot of pro's few cons. I beleive in asking the opinions of veteran pilots over anything I'm going to read. In my case..the plane would be making 30 minute flights perhaps a dozen times a year. My investment is viable when I consider living in retirement for 20 or more years.. The money spent chartering those flights would be about three times the cost of investing in the plane...and the plane can be making money otherwise...sound right ?

  5. #5

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    Hmm...not sure I follow. Are you going to learn to fly so you can fly it? Or are you hiring somebody to fly it?

    If you are going to fly it, you should be planning to fly a lot more than 6 hours per year...that is not enough to be comfortable, current, and safe as a pilot. I aim for 200 or more hours...50 hours is more what a lot of people are aiming for...but 6 is way too few.

    As for the airplane making money question...how will the plane make money? Very few airplanes make money, otherwise we would all be doing whatever it is that allows them to do that. If you are flying less than 50 hours a year, there is almost no scenario where buying a plane will save money over just chartering the flights.

    You have not provided enough information to ascertain whether you have found the exception to this rule...but based on what you have posted, the engine doesn't matter...it is not a viable financial scenario if you expect to make money with the plane, and it is not a viable aviation management scenario if you are planning to fly 6 hours per year. And sitting is the worst thing that can happen to an airplane and engine.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Troy Hamon View Post
    Hmm...not sure I follow. Are you going to learn to fly so you can fly it? Or are you hiring somebody to fly it?

    If you are going to fly it, you should be planning to fly a lot more than 6 hours per year...that is not enough to be comfortable, current, and safe as a pilot. I aim for 200 or more hours...50 hours is more what a lot of people are aiming for...but 6 is way too few.

    As for the airplane making money question...how will the plane make money? Very few airplanes make money, otherwise we would all be doing whatever it is that allows them to do that. If you are flying less than 50 hours a year, there is almost no scenario where buying a plane will save money over just chartering the flights.

    You have not provided enough information to ascertain whether you have found the exception to this rule...but based on what you have posted, the engine doesn't matter...it is not a viable financial scenario if you expect to make money with the plane, and it is not a viable aviation management scenario if you are planning to fly 6 hours per year. And sitting is the worst thing that can happen to an airplane and engine.
    I would agree with all of this. I'm also not sure what owning part of a plane would do for you if you were not a pilot.

  7. #7
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    All good questions. I fould several places that will lease private planes for training . Some of them maintain everything..some only the major things. Flying has been a long dream...and I am thinking of pursuing it. Since I have the time..and a good aviation friend..they tell me I can be done in six months . I totally realize that does not make me ready to fly in Alaska.. I've been a paying passenger in enough bush planes to know that ! I'm semi retired and making as many of the dreams come true is the agenda. For the short and easy flights into my place...I do not need anything but a safe affordable plane. My investment would not be large. One thing I've noticed in Bush pilots over the years is the respect among them...I wouldn't mind being a part of that. .I've met some characters and attitudes..but all good guys and a few ladies too. My main concern is to avoid investing in a "dog".. or an unreliable design. I would imagine you get what you pay for...like anything else in life. Please keep the good info. Coming...as I said before..honesty from those who live the life is what I'm after.

  8. #8

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    Well, two things...first is that places do lease airplanes...usually because they can't profit from owning them and they want to hand the loss center off to another owner. I am not saying it is not possible to earn money, but basically I would not plan on my plane making money unless you want to be working at it feverishly.

    Second, Continental O-470 engines are ubiquitous in the industry. However, of the ones out there, most people have moved away from the -A and -J models. People with more expertise can weigh in on that.

    Most people start out with smaller airplanes, anything flying an O-470 of any stamp is not a typical beginner airplane. If your dream is to learn to fly, you likely could do it in another plane with less power and have an easier initial learning curve.

    I bought an airplane to learn to fly in...so I am not prone to thinking of that as a bad idea. But I would recommend that you don't buy more plane initially than you need for learning...or at least not much more. What you are proposing to do is similar to buying a pickup truck to learn to drive in, and asking whether you should get one with a Cummins engine. Sort of way ahead of yourself...

    I love flying, I hope you will too. What I am concerned about is that you will buy into a partnership on an airplane that hardly flies, try to rent it out to make it cost less, end up with surprises from rental disasters to mechanical gotchas, and not have the financial wherewithal to soldier through it and keep flying...because I have seen similar scenarios. And it usually starts with getting into more airplane than necessary too early.
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    Thanks for the honesty. Again these are just scenarios..i don't really need the plane to make any money... I've been successful by finding a niches and out competing my competition...even in retirement I think that way. I can buy 140..150 Cessna here as well as Piper Colts for less than 20k. I've been told they are excellent learning and time building options. My concern is...a year into it I may want a bit more plane. I'm looking at alot of options. This engine question is based on an older plane retro fitted with this engine. The deal is good...but again ..I don't want to buy a loser. The seller lists the engine at 225 HP. More than I need for the short ride to my cabin.. But the extra power sounded good for the price.

  10. #10

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    My advice...take some of your money to a flight school and fly 5 or 10 hours with an instructor in a primary training aircraft. Let your dreams of horsepower settle along with some stick time in a less vigorous machine. It will help you separate your imagination from reality a bit.

    Airplane partnerships can be good...but I would rather own my own small plane than partner in a slightly larger one.

    Ideally, I would own my own small plane and partner in a substantially larger, like 6 seats...that would be ideal...but I really do like having a little plane sitting on the ramp waiting for me whenever I want it...
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  11. #11
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    Sounds like good advice...get the basics and fundamentals.... I guess i wouldn't be a guy if I didn't get a little excited about horsepower ! Its in our blood!

  12. #12

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    Yes...it is. But especially in aviation, it helps to have a solid sense of the difference between needed and wanted...and when things go wrong in a high power airplane they can go wrong at a high rate of speed and with a lot of energy...

    So like all of us, thinking about the perfect setup is fine. But I recommend you get a little ways down the road before you commit to something like that. Buying something that is trainer-ish is kind of different, as there is a solid market to sell it if you want and because it is less involved as a commitment either financially or legally (in case of a partnership).

    Anyway, good luck, have fun.

    Didn't mean to rain on the parade...just offering my perspective.

    Flying is great. Owning a TriPacer means I can fly over 100 hours per year...that is worth it to me. I would rather do that than have a 182 I can only fly 30 hours per year due to the financial realities of the two aircraft.


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