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Thread: Kenai River Guides

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    Default Kenai River Guides

    http://peninsulaclarion.com/news/201...eadily-growing

    From the Clarion. Guide numbers decreasing, proportion of out of state guides slowly increasing. Guides are mostly used by out of state visitors.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tee Jay View Post
    http://peninsulaclarion.com/news/201...eadily-growing

    From the Clarion. Guide numbers decreasing, proportion of out of state guides slowly increasing. Guides are mostly used by out of state visitors.
    The percentage and number of non residents that use guides is higher than I thought. I have a business that depends on tourism and know how important outside dollars are. If they get spent by Alaskans they have a significant multiplier effect. Has any agency ever determined the economic impact to the state that comes from non resident guided sports fishing? With dwindling revenues, it might be a good idea to court more of these outside sports fishers. Regrettably many of the high dollar lodges hire guides who are non residents and the dollars earned by them leave the state for the most part. But the Owners of the lodges are mostly Alaskans who spent their money in Alaska. That first fish a non resident catches is often very pricey.

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    Quote Originally Posted by onthego View Post
    The percentage and number of non residents that use guides is higher than I thought. I have a business that depends on tourism and know how important outside dollars are. If they get spent by Alaskans they have a significant multiplier effect. Has any agency ever determined the economic impact to the state that comes from non resident guided sports fishing? With dwindling revenues, it might be a good idea to court more of these outside sports fishers. Regrettably many of the high dollar lodges hire guides who are non residents and the dollars earned by them leave the state for the most part. But the Owners of the lodges are mostly Alaskans who spent their money in Alaska. That first fish a non resident catches is often very pricey.
    All true. Statistics show that many guides who start out as nonresidents often end up being residents, which is a good thing in my book. Like with comm fishing, I like to see as many residents participating as possible. You are not the only one with a business which relies on a healthy tourism industry Strength in diversity, and a healthy guide/sportfishing sector is an important part of that.

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    Quote Originally Posted by onthego View Post
    The percentage and number of non residents that use guides is higher than I thought. I have a business that depends on tourism and know how important outside dollars are. If they get spent by Alaskans they have a significant multiplier effect. Has any agency ever determined the economic impact to the state that comes from non resident guided sports fishing? With dwindling revenues, it might be a good idea to court more of these outside sports fishers. Regrettably many of the high dollar lodges hire guides who are non residents and the dollars earned by them leave the state for the most part. But the Owners of the lodges are mostly Alaskans who spent their money in Alaska. That first fish a non resident catches is often very pricey.
    ADF&G statistics show that residents are pretty consistent over the years at around 105,000 fishing licenses, while non-resident licenses are in the range of 253,000. King Salmon stamps are 55,000 resident to 86,500 non resident. The average non-resident license period is under 5 days.

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static-f/...2014report.pdf is a report on non-resident anglers on the ADF&G website.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tee Jay View Post
    ADF&G statistics show that residents are pretty consistent over the years at around 105,000 fishing licenses, while non-resident licenses are in the range of 253,000. King Salmon stamps are 55,000 resident to 86,500 non resident. The average non-resident license period is under 5 days.

    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static-f/...2014report.pdf is a report on non-resident anglers on the ADF&G website.
    Those are amazing numbers! How much money do you think the 250k non residents spend in the State? I used to have visitors who came to fish. I would take them to Mt View sports where they always seemed to spend hundreds on gear. Many stayed at the Cook, rented cars and in most cases either drove or flew somewhere to fish. With budget cuts and the accompanying loss of a lot of jobs these tourist dollars are going to come in handy for the economy.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tee Jay View Post
    ADF&G statistics show that residents are pretty consistent over the years at around 105,000 fishing licenses, while non-resident licenses are in the range of 253,000. King Salmon stamps are 55,000 resident to 86,500 non resident. The average non-resident license period is under 5 days.
    http://www.adfg.alaska.gov/static-f/...2014report.pdf is a report on non-resident anglers on the ADF&G website.
    Do those stats include the older folk residents who don't have to purchase licenses any more? I believe that's the 'over 60' crowd.
    Your sarcasm is way, waaaayyyyyyyy more sarcastic than mine!

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    Quote Originally Posted by cod View Post
    Do those stats include the older folk residents who don't have to purchase licenses any more? I believe that's the 'over 60' crowd.
    I don't think so. Looks like there are just under 20,000 low income licenses and 6,500 permanent id cards.

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    Quote Originally Posted by onthego View Post
    Those are amazing numbers! How much money do you think the 250k non residents spend in the State? I used to have visitors who came to fish. I would take them to Mt View sports where they always seemed to spend hundreds on gear. Many stayed at the Cook, rented cars and in most cases either drove or flew somewhere to fish. With budget cuts and the accompanying loss of a lot of jobs these tourist dollars are going to come in handy for the economy.
    Start with looking at the Kenai Borough sales tax collections and look at how the swell in the 2nd and 3rd quarters. The guide fees are $150 and up per person per trip times the number of trips. The report above shows 305,000 angler days on guided trips, 1/3 in freshwater and 2/3 in salt. The average short tem license duration is 4.8 days, so call it 5 days requiring meals and lodging. Dingy Manor lodging on the Kenai in summer is $100 and up. Fly Out Lodges seem to charge around $1,000 and up per day. There are a lot of fish boxes that leave Alaska, it usually generates a thread here every August on how to stop them. It all adds up to some serious money that supports a lot of Alaska jobs.

  9. #9

    Default Kenai River Guides

    Sportfishing and guided fishing are huge for our economy. So is commercial fishing. I try not to play the game of which is more important or beneficial, because I think they are both equally important. PU fishing is important too, and while it does bring money into communities, its importance lies in providing Alaskans with food and recreation. I get that, but it must be balanced against the benefits of the other fisheries if our aim is to maximize utility from this resource.

    Saw some interesting data at the Peninsula industry outlook forum a couple weeks ago. It showed that the tourism and guided fishing industries are as strong as ever on the peninsula, despite the weak King Salmon returns of the last few years. This correlates with several operations I've talked to, who claim they've had their best years ever lately. One person told me they've found good fishing where they never thought to look before the King fishery closed.

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