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Thread: Beach Landing at Polly Creek

  1. #1

    Default Beach Landing at Polly Creek

    How firm is the beach at Polly Creek/Cresent River area? Are people landing with 8.50x6 tires in that area or is it softer and require a larger tire? I picked up a copy of the 2016 tide table and was looking at the upcoming low tides in April and May and getting my calendar in order. Looks like the April tide cycle will be over a Saturday/Sunday which will be good for those who work traditional schedule jobs.

    I'd plan on landing on the lower section of the regular beach proper, in the firmer sand if possible, and walking out to the clam beds. I'm not interested in landing out on the clam beds like many others do. Plus, I could use the extra walking this time of year.

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    I was there last year. Chartered over in a boat. A couple had landed out on the sand bar in a cub. Tide coming in. Engine wouldn't start. Gal came trotting towards the boats and asking if anyone had a spare battery. Our skipper started getting one out, but her hubby finally got it fired. They gave a big wave at us when the flew over. Skipper was already thinking we might need to tow the plane to shore if all else failed. Could have been ugly.
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    Has anyone tried one of these to start their plane? I know they will start a v8 engine.
    http://www.amazon.com/15000mAH-Start...arting+battery
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    That reason, among many others, is why I'd prefer to land higher up the beach.


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    I'm curious as well, as I have 8.50's on a 170B. Bigger tires needed? GY 26's, AKBW 26's/29's?

    Thanks


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    The beach is fine for 8.50s as long as you stay below the high tide mark on the firmer sand. Here is a video, at 1:40 it shows me landing in my old citabria out on a sandbar over a mile off shore. I had bush wheels on, but they barely left an impression. There were 172s on 850's out there as well. If you land on the beach make sure you go out there as the tide is going out and follow it out and then come back in as soon as you have your clams. It will be at least a mile to where the clams are and you could still get overtaken by the tide if your out there trying to get back to the beach.

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    I once saw a guy and his family land near the tide line in a stock Cherokee Six. With window curtains no-less. His whole family was wearing church clothes. My son and I looked like ship wreck survivors a few yards away in our beat-up PA-12. That tide moves in very fast.
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    Member Hunt'N'Photos's Avatar
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    Here is a picture from my second trip over there. You can see the tire tracks and how firm the sand is.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hunt'N'Photos View Post
    Here is a picture from my second trip over there. You can see the tire tracks and how firm the sand is.

    That does it. Now I will have to get a pack of Polly Creek Razors out of the freezer for dinner. Dip in egg batter, cracker crumbs, cook only a couple minutes with hot oil in a cast iron skillet. Won't be needing any side dishes.
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    Quote Originally Posted by SmokeRoss View Post
    That does it. Now I will have to get a pack of Polly Creek Razors out of the freezer for dinner. Dip in egg batter, cracker crumbs, cook only a couple minutes with hot oil in a cast iron skillet. Won't be needing any side dishes.
    Doesn't get much better than that!
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  11. #11

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    Are you referencing off of the Drift River Terminal tides? What are the minimum low tides for claiming there? Sorry, I'm new at organizing a clamming trip over there? Thanks.


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    We went over during the big tides, but I know for a fact you can get clams any time the tide is out. You don't have to dig right at Polly either. I've dug them near Redoubt Creek.
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    I landed out there last year, 170B on 8.50s. I landed up on the beach, not on the hard stuff, as I had no intention of tempting fate. The sand is soft and it took some power, but otherwise was just fine and plan on doing it again. Got a bunch of clams last July 3rd under a blazing sun... workout and a tan!

    Brian
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    There is an old saying. Never eat clams that were harvested in a month with an "R" in it.
    May-June-July-August only.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    There is an old saying. Never eat clams that were harvested in a month with an "R" in it.
    May-June-July-August only.
    My dad always said to only harvest small game in the months that DID have an R. During the months that don't they are raising their young. I think a lot of these old sayings have a basis in fact. I will dig clams in April though and prefer clams dug earlier in the season to those in late summer.
    BTW, had Polly Creek razors 2 evenings in a row. Sunday and Monday. Sure were tasty.
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    That makes sense with small game because of the cooler temps. Winter snow-shoe hares have less parasites. I think the reasoning with clams is that the warmer months means more fresh water flow has let them clean out all the winter yuckies. I still let them sit overnight in buckets of salt water with cornmeal in it. That lets them clean their guts out. Having gown up on the shores of Kachemak Bay, I have seen what happens when folks eat bad shell fish.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    I still let them sit overnight in buckets of salt water with cornmeal in it. That lets them clean their guts out. .
    I've never understood the logic of putting cornmeal in the water. Is there any proof that clams eat cornmeal? If they did is their a difference between what clams eat in the ocean poop and cornmeal poop?

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    They cycle the nice clean cornmeal through their guts at a fairly high rate. Overnight, the clean salt water becomes yucky water when they expel all the black poop from their guts. When you clean them the next day there is very little black stuff inside them. Just some clean corn meal.
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  19. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    There is an old saying. Never eat clams that were harvested in a month with an "R" in it.
    May-June-July-August only.
    No, No, NO!
    It's the opposite. Never harvest in months that do NOT have an "R" in them.
    It's because of red tide and PSP.
    Here's a reference:
    https://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/...cle/002851.htm

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    Hmm the article refers to warm waters, not taking into account things like ice. However, while we may never have had red tide while I was growing up, (50s 60s and early 70s) the climate changes could have very well changed the water temps enough up here that we may now be vulnerable to the red tide and other assorted nasty algae blooms. I always liked early May for my clam digging. But after years and years of having to eat things like crab and shellfish, I will pass on it if possible.
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