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Thread: Be sure of your target, what's in line with it, what's behind it

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Default Be sure of your target, what's in line with it, what's behind it

    I often wonder how many folks really, REALLY take the time to think about what's downrange, when setting up for, and taking the shot(s), especially when shooting in open country and farmland, such and when taking snap shots at running animals like coyotes? When I consider a target in flat country, or when I hear stories about taking shots at running yotes or deer, I always think of the news story I saw some years ago about a woman who was taking her daily walk on a farm country road and caught a bullet in the neck. Bullet apparently came out of the clear blue, and near as anyone could figure, it must have come from far, far away... Do you really, truly, ensure you know what's behind your target, every single time, or do you just make an assumption, play the odds and hope for the best?
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
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    I can say with certainty that there are whole lot of guys out there who just don't care.

    We live well out of town, but there is a scattering of houses mostly within sight of the road. Got a highway sign right in front of my house with bullet holes in it. Had a guy roll down the window of his car and shoot a deer in my garden right next to the barn. Neighbor had a deer in his driveway, and a guy shot the deer with his house and car in plain sight behind it.

    I could go on.

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    Saw a target set up on a tree in Gray Cliff last week behind a cabin. The tree the target is on sits right on the end of a cleared trail. They will be shooting right down the atv trail when shooting at their target. Jasmine Court near Jacobs Ladder. First cabin you see when you come up Jacobs ladder off the beach. Real smart.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Ain't roads nor structures where I hunt.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Matt View Post
    Ain't roads nor structures where I hunt.
    Sounds like the perfect place to find other hunters!
    I am serious... and don't call me Shirley.

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    Next year will be 40 years for our coyote crew. Never an accident of any kind. We are not imune to it but we don't take chances. You don't shoot at skyline coyotes and you know where each other are at all times. We have been hunting the same ground so long with the same old farts that it's automatic. My biggest worry is a ricochet even though frangible bullets are all we allow.

    We have had to give up some prime ground because areas get to settled and are being asked to come back in spite of 10 house per square mile in the settled areas. Myself, I have purchased a shotgun and a Carlson buckshot choke fore the more settled areas.

    It is a good topic to bring up lest we don't stay mindful about what's at stake. I so love my guns and the right to hunt but along with that comes gobs of responsibility. I shudder to think of the horror that would engulf our group in the event of a gun related mishap. I know many of the hunters who's coyote groups hunt land that borders our turf. None of them have ever had a problem related to a stray bullet.

    Last year a 60 year old coyote hunter from the east side of our county was killed when his own son hooked a chain to a jerk rope for a little more reach. A link in the chain broke and it sling shot through the fathers back window killing him instantly. There seams to more coyote hunting injuries that are related other aspects of the hunt and few if any that are gun related.

    Party hunting for deer has claimed more lives than should be allowed. I won't be a part of that. In 1995 I bought some timber and built a house at the east end of the timber. During the first 2 years we lived there we had 2 slug holes in the house and one through the box of my pick up while it sat next the house. I just don't understand the mindset that makes a whitetail buck cause so many full grown men to forsake sanity in their quest to put those horns on their wall.

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elmerkeithclone View Post
    It is a good topic to bring up lest we don't stay mindful about what's at stake. I so love my guns and the right to hunt but along with that comes gobs of responsibility. I shudder to think of the horror that would engulf our group in the event of a gun related mishap.
    That news story really struck a chord with me personally. Horror is the word, indeed. The thought of something like that happening gives me pause every time I raise a muzzle in the field.
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

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    I was walking my dog along the path in Eagle River. The one along the Glenn. Came to the tunnel that passes under the N. Eagle River exit and saw this sign. It struck me as funny in a couple ways. What possesses a person to pull out a gun in such a populated area of town to shoot a sign? And secondly, I guess you can't fault the person for not knowing their backstop. That hill is a pretty decent backstop I suppose. Still, bonehead move.
    Attachment 88288Attachment 88289

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    My dad would often point to shot up signs and say, "look, there is another example of a guy with more bullets than brains" My house and a lot of others as well as a school are directly behind a frequently shot up sign along the Glenn Highway. In this computer age you would think they could make a sign that would shoot back when hit. Wouldn't that be interesting?

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Having been the recent perpetrator of an act of negligence with a firearm, I have a new outlook on the whole thing. You can never be too careful.

    I am currently reading a book called "Blood on the Leaves" that was given to me by a friend and fellow hunter ed instructor. It's a good read that all of us should pick up. It's a collection of hunting accident and negligence stories.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    For some reason my images didn't upload right. So here there are again:
    Attachment 88292Attachment 88293

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    I am very selective about who I hunt with because so many people are careless with their weapon. Any time we launch a bullet at any animal that is not standing directly in front of a hill or similar back stop we are taking a chance.

    How many moose are shot every year when they are standing in the trees and brush and how far can we really see behind them? So if the bullet does a pass through it may not stop until a solid object like a tree is hit? Kind of a creepy thought for sure.

    I only hunt in Alaska and know little about shot gun hunting for deer. According to a military study from a few years ago a 2 3/4 inch shot gun slug has the potential to travel further then a few hundred yards. I think deer hunters in elevated stands would have the ground as a back stop, right?

    As more and more hunters are competing for game in smaller hunting areas the potential for negligent shooting incidents will increase. Sad but true.

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    I was hiking with a female friend during hunting season about three years. It was a trail we'd been on once before. In this area, the rules require a camp to be a minimum of 150' from a body of water and 150' from any trail. My friend and I were walking on a trail and came upon a make-shift hunters' camp of tarps, cots and cooking equipment blocking our way. The camp was literally on trail itself and 10' from a lake's edge.

    What irritated me was there must have been 50 or 60 empty beer bottled hung on tree limbs like a Christmas tree. Shots rang in the not-too-far distance. We both looked at each other and said it was time to head back.

    I am confident that alcohol can cause one to forget every one of the four main rules of gun safety.

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    Pretty sure alcohol or not, what you had there was a mental midget.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

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    I'm waiting for people to be shot with TrackingPoint technology. An African PH and a friend of mine played with the TrackingPoint in Africa on plains game--usually on bait or pot permits. The big problem is that the TrackingPoint stuff isn't aware of what is behind the target, so it would fire the gun after another animal had moved behind the target. So they had two-fers quite often with the scope.

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    Quote Originally Posted by .338 mag. View Post
    I think deer hunters in elevated stands would have the ground as a back stop, right?
    I've hunted a lot in parts of Texas where you use a blind because you can't see anything on foot. And you don't really have the ground as a backstop very often, because while you are raised up, you're looking down a sendero or other clear patch, which might end on a hill or something. The benefit there though is, since it's mostly private land in Texas, you know where everyone else is--or they're trespassing. On shared leases, me and another guy simply said we wouldn't shoot out of particular blind windows.

    Day leases or guided leases with blinds usually have the blinds set ~50 yards or less from a feeder, aimed down a ravine or into thick forest, without another blind downrange.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tod13 View Post
    I'm waiting for people to be shot with TrackingPoint technology. An African PH and a friend of mine played with the TrackingPoint in Africa on plains game--usually on bait or pot permits. The big problem is that the TrackingPoint stuff isn't aware of what is behind the target, so it would fire the gun after another animal had moved behind the target. So they had two-fers quite often with the scope.
    Had to look that up to see what it was. That shouldn't ever be legal for hunting.

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