Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 29

Thread: Newb pilot here can you guys help me not get killed

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    15

    Default Newb pilot here can you guys help me not get killed

    Hello all,
    I'm one of the silent guys who rarely posts here but read it everyday. I was hoping to get some advice from the veteran pilots on here from where I should take my new learning license. I have some mountain flying training I'm doing this weekend and spin training coming up next week. My question to you guys is what order would you would you recommend doing your training in. I plan on getting my instrument but just don't know if I should jump right in to that or learn some other skills before. There's so many possibilities and I want to do them all but what would you guys recommend? I fly at least twice a week and am getting more comfortable Flying Alaska. What should learn first?

    Any other comments or advice is welcome too

  2. #2
    Member Barnstormer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Sterling
    Posts
    64

    Default

    Get yourself a couple of hours of aerobatic training so you understand how to right an aircraft that's been flipped upside down.

    Watch this video till it's embedded in your brain.


    And get yourself a copy of "Fly The Wild & Stay Alive" by Hal Terry, best bush flying book I've come across. Read it over and over and over cause you'll learn something new everytime as your skill progresses.

    And fly, fly, fly! :-) Nothing substitutes for stick time.
    Phil Whittemore
    If you're not living on the edge you're taking up too much space.

    https://share.delorme.com/PhilWhittemore

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    1,461

    Default

    Barnstormer is exactly right. Arial acrobatic training will teach you what both you and your airplane are capable of. Do get your instrument ticket, but aerobatic training will be the best training you will ever get.

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    northern alaska
    Posts
    1,159

    Default

    What type of flying are you doing twice a week? What kind of flying are you interested in? You need to give a bit more information before you can get any worthwhile advice.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    77

    Default Human factors

    Confidence enables
    Overconfidence disables

    Besides paying attention to the decision making process and to self evaluation of that process you might give some thought to a
    little training in gliders. Flying the ridge lines unpowered brings into focus the factors that come into play in mountain operations.
    Aerobatic training is a good confidence builder too.

  6. #6

    Default

    Where are you flying out of and do you have your own plane or are you renting? Aerobatic/spin training is one of the best things you can do. The more training you have the better. Take some time out just to have fun!!! Go do some ski flying with Don Lee in Talkeetna, you will learn as much more than ski flying. Don't discount hanger flying on the bad days lots to learn from the old/young guys that have already made some mistakes.
    DENNY

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    15

    Default

    wow thanks for all the replies so far. Right now I'm renting from the club on the base. Buying a plane is a little unrealistic for me until I get out of the military but definitely in the future(I get out in 2 years). Right now I'm just trying to build time so I usually go out and do a cross country and land at an airport I'm not familiar with along with working the basics as I'm sure it takes more than a check ride to say you've mastered them. I am trying to get to a point where I am safe to fly in and out of hunting spots but definitely nowhere close to that point. I'm not planning on making a career out of flying and its all for personal use. I should have clarified earlier I will also be doing some basic aerobatics when I do my spin training.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    15

    Default

    I hadn't even thought of that. Who would you recommend for glider training?

    Quote Originally Posted by upstreamV View Post
    Confidence enables
    Overconfidence disables

    Besides paying attention to the decision making process and to self evaluation of that process you might give some thought to a
    little training in gliders. Flying the ridge lines unpowered brings into focus the factors that come into play in mountain operations.
    Aerobatic training is a good confidence builder too.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    77

    Default Glider training

    To the best of my knowledge there are no commercial glider operations in Alaska however the Soaring Society of America is a good source of information and will list schools and clubs across the USA. It is best to do some research so as to find a site that features mountain or ridge flying nearby as these schools will offer exposure to the techniques which can transfer into the useful skill of reading mountain terrain. That skill transfers to airplanes and helicopter flying.

    A lot depends upon the season and upon your personal preferences as to travel. Tennessee, Virginia, Washington, California, Nevada, Colorado, New Mexico and several other states offer suitable sites. Some will be commercial schools and some are clubs. Back East Chilhowee Gliderport in Tennessee has a nice location but the ridge is seasonal. Minden Soaring Club (NV) is near Reno and would be a good place to check out online. Marfia Gliders in West Texas may or may not be offering pre solo training but Burt Compton is a soaring legend and great educator and would be worth talking to. Again Alaska has great soaring but no commercial schools so it's outside for training. You can PM me. Good luck

  10. #10
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,393

    Default

    Who would you guys recommend for aerobatic training? That's not something I've ever done.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Los Anchorage
    Posts
    314

    Default

    1) What everyone else has already said;
    2) If you're getting more training, aerobatic will be more useful in Alaska "Bush Flying" than instrument training; that being said, having been a passenger twice (in the pre-PA-12 days) when the tower had to talk the pilot in, absolutely nothing wrong with instrument training; I would opine that instrument skills degrade faster than others without routine use, though.
    3) Time in the plane; time in the plane;.....yes, just burn some hours, but dedicated and focused time ("Today I will do 20 landings trying to hit my spot a) with the right main gear 1st; b) with the left main gear first; c) in full 3-point; and d) wheel landings") is very beneficial as well...particularly if done twice a week.
    4) SET PERSONAL LIMITS.....and don't breach them: These can and should change as one's skills increase, but know and never exceed your own limits on today's flight. At my cabin strip, while I won't bust any FAA-imposed minimums otherwise (of course), I won't take off if I can't see the river. Even though I've made the flight from the cabin to Palmer a couple of thousand times or the flight from cabin to Willow a few hundred...so I could do it by direction and time, I won't takeoff if I can't see the river. That's a visibility limit. I won't go into the cabin if winds at Palmer are from the East at anything over 20 knots: that's a comfort and control limit cause I'll get my azz beatup trying to get to the cabin and it's always a toad's wild ride on landing from surface turbulence.

  12. #12
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    15

    Default

    Thanks so much guys it really puts a different perspective on flying when I can get input from people who are doing the type of flying that I want to do.

  13. #13

    Default

    Starting in May there is a fly-in every weekend somewhere. Get a buddy or two and rent a plane for a day one flys in the other flys out. Put notes on message board every message board you can find in ANC asking to just ride along. You do not always have to be the pilot to learn what a plane can do. You will hear a lot of dogma of how things should be done, take it all with a grain or shaker of salt as needed. One thing you will find is everyone flys different!!! If you get the chance a ride and fly VFR with some experienced pilots on bad weather days you will be surprised on what can be done in bad weather and still be safe and legal. Don't do it by yourself or even try to follow someone in the skud until you have some experience. If I hear of an open seat in the next few weeks I will post it here. I think all the advice in the above posts has been excellent.

    Brian
    I did mine in Chandler AZ, just went back last mo for an hour of refresher when I was visiting family. If you go there I do have a instructor I prefer. Chuck Moore out of willow does aerobatic/spin training but last time I talked to him he said he only does it in the summer because he uses bunny boots in the winter.
    DENNY

  14. #14
    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Tanana Valley AK
    Posts
    7,217

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by upstreamV View Post
    To the best of my knowledge there are no commercial glider operations in Alaska however the Soaring Society of America is a good source of information and will list schools and clubs across the USA. It is best to do some research so as to find a site that features mountain or ridge flying nearby as these schools will offer exposure to the techniques which can transfer into the useful skill of reading mountain terrain. That skill transfers to airplanes and helicopter flying.
    Does the CAP still operate gliders down that way? They might be a good place to fish for other Alaska contacts. There used to be a small group that operated out of FBK too, but they got the boot a couple years ago, so maybe no longer active(?).
    ...he who knows nothing is nearer to truth than he whose mind is filled with falsehoods & errors. ~Thomas Jefferson
    I would rather have a mind opened by wonder than one closed by belief. ~Gerry Spence
    The last thing Alaska needs is another bigot. ~member Catch It
    #Resist

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    anchorage
    Posts
    77

    Default

    CAP Birchwood

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    northern alaska
    Posts
    1,159

    Default

    CAP in FAI still does the glider flying @ Clear (Radar) in the Summer

  17. #17
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Kachemak Bay Alaska
    Posts
    4,217

    Default

    As for gliders in Alaska, the Civil Air Patrol is the only game. They will train senior members ( adults) in gliders if you act as a tow pilot for awhile. Glider flying is a group activity, as a result it is a real kick in the pants because the thrill is contagious.

    A couple of us in Homer have been trying to figure out how to get a glider club going, since we have a lot of local mechanical lift. So far I only have a couple other folks who might be interested.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  18. #18
    Member Wldlndfirefghtr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    Eagle River & Fairbanks, AK
    Posts
    88

    Default

    My 2 cents;

    Risk Management Decision Making

    Subscribe to AOPA air safety institute or type that into YouTube and watch case files, good to get an understanding for risk management.

    NTSB reading: boring but may gain something from it

    Experience: go fly, baby steps, don't be afraid to spend some $ to have additional instructor time to brush up on areas you want to improve on or test, i.e. Marginal VFR limits, etc.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  19. #19
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2015
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    15

    Default

    You guys keep posting them i'll keep listening(implementing it). I flew a 182 yesterday for the first time and then took it on my mountain checkout flight today with my instructor we also took one of his students to ride with us. Holy cow what a lot to learn in 5 hours. It was a little nerve racking but definitely a huge confidence booster. I definitely needed a change of shorts after some of those downdrafts and after landing over those tall trees in Hope with a plane i'm not very familiar with.

  20. #20
    Member Barnstormer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Location
    Sterling
    Posts
    64

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by airborne3406 View Post
    ...I flew a 182 yesterday for the first time....I definitely needed a change of shorts after some of those downdrafts and after landing over those tall trees in Hope with a plane i'm not very familiar with.
    Fun stuff! And we've all been there. ;-)

    Learn to lift (drop) a wing with the rudder, not the aileron, and do it with an instructor who understands the importance (and when not to do it). Flying in the mountains, especially in a high-lift winged aircraft like a SuperCub, if you let a wing get gusted up you may not have enough aileron to counter, in fact quite likely you won't. But if you aggressively and quickly apply full rudder, and full power if needed, you can get the wing back down. And if that still doesn't work then just finish rolling the plane - that's a big part of what the aerobatic training is for.

    And as Wldlndfirefghtr said, "baby steps". If you are not comfortable then don't do it. And don't get drawn in to doing something because your friend just did it. Stay within your current skill set. And when you do push your envelope do so in just the tiniest little bit, and only if you feel sharp, alert and up to it. Even after thousands of off-airport landings under my belt there are still times when I recognize I'm not at my 100% for off-airport play. Good enough to safely fly around the patch, or to a friends, but not good enough to a place that requires a maximum skill effort on my part.

    And no matter where you are, always carry what you need to survive outside for a number of days (like 4 at least), and always carry a form of satellite communication with friends, family, and rescurers. Flying off-airport you will eventually get stuck somewhere, or bend an airplane, or both. Nice to be able to tell folks what you need, stay warm, and fire up some coffee while waiting for assistance.
    Phil Whittemore
    If you're not living on the edge you're taking up too much space.

    https://share.delorme.com/PhilWhittemore

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •