Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 25

Thread: Bison hunting sled

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    431

    Default Bison hunting sled

    Impossible to find Ultra High Densitu Plastic here so I made a sled out of 8 foot 2x12's, an old solid hitch, high density 1/4" plastic cut into two 2x 8 foot sheets and two Teflon runners. Pretty fast and total cost under 200.00

    1) The Boy uses the table saw to trim the end cap

    2: Nearing Completion..note Komatiq style runners, two layers of 1/4 HD plastic and the Teflon, Also note my little work buddy.

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    431

    Default

    The thing is a little heavy. 2x10's next time but so far I like it.


    Finished sled


    Test Run


    Video
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zysUHltxqG4




  3. #3
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Yellowknife, NWT
    Posts
    3,318

    Default

    Nice job.
    I built my own komaitk last year to haul materials to build my cabin.
    It works great and is as solid as a rock!!
    You can attach a box on it for hauling gas, camping gear etc.




  4. #4
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    Skookum looking sleds gentlemen. I really used to enjoy making a new freighter sled every couple of years, since I would beat the heck out of them, especially crossing river ice. It seems you can never over-build a sled, but it's somewhat amusing following someone who has under-built and watching their sled coming apart piece by piece.

  5. #5
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    13,392

    Default

    Which bison tag do you have? Are you just going to be using it around the fields in Delta, or are you pulling that up and over the Iditarod trail on your way to the Farewell area?

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    431

    Default

    It's to the East of you here in the Yukon...lots of Bison but they get pretty sneaky when they are hunted a bit.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    431

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DRIFTER_016 View Post
    Nice job.
    I built my own komaitk last year to haul materials to build my cabin.
    It works great and is as solid as a rock!!
    You can attach a box on it for hauling gas, camping gear etc.
    How do you like the Komatiq design off trail? Does it work ok in deep snow?

  8. #8
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Yellowknife, NWT
    Posts
    3,318

    Default

    Haven't used it off trail yet as it was built mainly to haul lumber and materials from an ice road into my cabin.
    This is all I have done so far. I moved 25,000#'s of materials last spring with it.
    I run a packed trail from the ice road to my cabin 1/2km away.
    If I was using it to run off trail it would have the large up swept runners like yours.

    Mine is patterned off the sleds used up on the Arctic ocean only without the up swept runners to help get over uneven terrain and ice.

    It is also a lot shorter @ 8 feet than the big Northern sleds that can be up to 20 feet long.

  9. #9
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DRIFTER_016 View Post

    Mine is patterned off the sleds used up on the Arctic ocean only without the up swept runners to help get over uneven terrain and ice.

    It is also a lot shorter @ 8 feet than the big Northern sleds that can be up to 20 feet long.
    Seems like the big arctic sleds don't use solid hitches either, right?

  10. #10
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Yellowknife, NWT
    Posts
    3,318

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sayak View Post
    Seems like the big arctic sleds don't use solid hitches either, right?
    Correct. Their terrain is pretty much flat so they use ropes.
    You try that down here and your sled goes on one side of the tree and your komatik the other side.
    Doesn't work out too well.

    Not to mention we have hills. Would suck to have your fully loaded komatik pass you going down one of them.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,902

    Default

    Are you guys using springed hitches? I tried pulling some heavy loads a few years back with a sled that didn't have springs on the hitch. Spin out, get stuck. I added a shaft with a spring fore and aft, and can now get the machine to move a little before it takes up the load. When I stop, the rear spring collapses a little to give me even more movement when I go.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  12. #12
    Member DRIFTER_016's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Yellowknife, NWT
    Posts
    3,318

    Default

    You bet!!
    Swivel hitch complete with springs and grease nipple.


  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,902

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DRIFTER_016 View Post
    You bet!!
    Swivel hitch complete with springs and grease nipple.

    Mine are very similar. They are a huge help.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Whitehorse, Yukon
    Posts
    431

    Default

    I spent 9 years in Nunavut and there the rope hitches work out pretty well especially when going through rough sea ice, where the ropes allow you to use a bit of "English" on your sled and with practice use the momentum of the sled to get through the rough stuff. On land it can be a bit tricky but with no trees you can learn to go down hills with minimum mayhem (usually suffer a few spectacular crashes while learning though). The Komatiq can be very heavily laden with your entire family riding on it and sometimes you need to use the spring of a long nylon rope to get the whole outfit started.

    In a treed environment the ropes would be impossible. For light sleds I see a lot of foam "springs" used on the solid hitch rather than the steel springs above.


  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2014
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    1,902

    Default

    My aluminum toboggan style sled is just wide enough to fit an half tote in. I can then load the half tote with the large milk crates stacked 2 high. Nothing gets shook uo, and it's easy packing the gear into the cabin. All dry too. I load the gas cans in behind the half tote. Never any problem even if one leaks a little.
    Hunt Ethically. Respect the Environment.

  16. #16
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    Rope hitches are still popular on Alaska flat lands. This photo is 1980 Bethel area. I know someone who died in Dillingham area from a rope-hitched sled running him over on his machine when he stopped short.Attachment 88281

  17. #17
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,835

    Default

    no eye protectio

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,246

    Default

    Does anybody know why a rope-hitches is so popular in the artic? I think I do but I would like to hear what others think before saying.

  19. #19

    Default

    Cheap, quickly replaceable, have some give like a rubber band, lets you back up and take another go slightly to the side. Another one would be if you have you sled or your machine go in the water it gives you a second to see that and bail, like when old cat trains had steel wire about 100 feet long between there load and the cat.

  20. #20
    Member sayak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Location
    Central peninsula, between the K-rivers
    Posts
    5,788

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bullelkklr View Post
    no eye protectio
    Rope hitches are still popular on Alaska flat lands. This photo is 1980 Bethel area. I know someone who died in Dillingham area from a rope-hitched sled running him over on his machine when he stopped short.1980 village snomos copy.jpg

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •