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Thread: Best place to get 6" double wall stove pipe

  1. #1
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Default Best place to get 6" double wall stove pipe

    I have a little cast-iron potbellied stove that I'd like to install in my cabin, so I'm in the market for some 6" double wall stove pipe and was wondering if anybody had any good ideas on the best place/prices to get it. I won't be installing it until this summer so even if ordering it would be my best option, that's fine because I have plenty of time to do that.


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    Member akriverunner's Avatar
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    I would call around locally then compare to Amazon prices. There's a fair amount of Selkirk brand on Amazon with prime shipping


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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    In Fairbanks I'd know where to send you. Down there, I'd have to fish the web site: http://www.icc-rsf.com/en/main.php?c...&l=en&i=41#res
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    Member akriverunner's Avatar
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    I feel like all the fireplace stores are fairly the same on prices. Not sure if you can get stuff online cheaper or not.


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    Compare with Lowes prices.

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    Do you want double wall, or do you want insulated pipe? You will need insulated pipe for any wall or roof penetrations. I beat Amazon prime prices on Selkirk metalbestos, but I'm a bit of a drive north of you. Lowes sells Selkirk SuperVent and it will not interchange with the other Selkirk products like UltraTemp and the SureTemp that we sell. Honestly, Lowes' product is good and about the best price you will find locally or online.
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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Default Best place to get 6" double wall stove pipe

    From the stove to the ceiling will be just single wall, black, 6" stove pipe, then I guess insulated/double wall or maybe even triple wall, whatever is recommended, thru the ceiling and into the second floor then continue up and thru the roof. I have only been to North Country Stoves for pricing and they quoted me around $2,000, which seemed awfully steep to me. I need to figure out exactly what I will need to meet code/be safe, etc. but I was just wondering if anybody had any good ideas regarding cheaper places to purchase the materials.


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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    From the stove to the ceiling will be just single wall, black, 6" stove pipe, then I guess insulated/double wall or maybe even triple wall, whatever is recommended, thru the ceiling and into the second floor then continue up and thru the roof. I have only been to North Country Stoves for pricing and they quoted me around $2,000, which seemed awfully steep to me. I need to figure out exactly what I will need to meet code/be safe, etc. but I was just wondering if anybody had any good ideas regarding cheaper places to purchase the materials.
    >EXCEL< is what I like to use. It's not cheap, but it's as good as you can get (and likely the product North Country was quoting). $2K does sound a little steep, offhand, but it might not be too far off depending on how much length you need. If you have to go through a second floor and a roof/attic space, it's gonna be a bit spendy.

    I don't like Metalbestos, but it'll be the less expensive ubiquitous option available at the box stores, hardware stores, etc.
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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    >EXCEL< is what I like to use. It's not cheap, but it's as good as you can get. $2K does sound a little steep, offhand, but it might not be too far off depending on how much length you need.
    From where I start the insulated pipe, I'll need about 6' to get through the roof then I'll have to go up another 6 feet or so to be adequately above the peak, but I don't know if that (the part that is outside) needs to be double walled or not, I'm assuming not.


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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    From where I start the insulated pipe, I'll need about 6' to get through the roof then I'll have to go up another 6 feet or so to be adequately above the peak, but I don't know if that (the part that is outside) needs to be double walled or not, I'm assuming not.


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    I could be wrong but I would think you only need one section of the insulated stuff to get through the ceiling, and one section to get through the roof. You don't need it above the roof. Do you feel you need the 6 foot above the ceiling to the roof insulated because people might be able to touch it? I mean it can't hurt for sure but is it necessary? As you probably know the insulated stuff is where it gets spendy.....
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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    From where I start the insulated pipe, I'll need about 6' to get through the roof then I'll have to go up another 6 feet or so to be adequately above the peak, but I don't know if that (the part that is outside) needs to be double walled or not, I'm assuming not.
    If you're going through the downstairs ceiling, then through the upstairs loft/living space, then through the roof, +6' outside the roof.... to do it right, you should be double wall insulated from about 6" below the downstairs ceiling, all the way to the top. That's what makes it spendy. You could try to finagle a way to go back and forth from insulated pipe to uninsulated and back again, but the products aren't designed to do that, and don't really lend themselves to it, it won't be very safe, and any bank or insurance inspector will not buy it. And in the long run, it'll be a PITA to try to cobble together, and not worth the few bucks you might save. You can go with single wall or double wall uninsulated from the stove to near the first ceiling, but you should be double wall insulated pipe above that. North Country is, I believe, an >EXCEL< dealer, and probably what they quoted you was for what I described above.
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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    If you're going through the downstairs ceiling, then through the upstairs loft/living space, then through the roof, +6' outside the roof.... to do it right, you should be double wall insulated from 6" below the downstairs ceiling, all the way to the top. That's what makes it spendy. You could try to finagle a way to go back and forth from insulated pipe to uninsulated and back again, but the products aren't designed to do that, and don't really lend themselves to it, it won't be very safe, and any bank or insurance inspector will not buy it. And in the long run, it'll be a PITA to try to cobble together, and not worth the few bucks you might save. You can go with single wall or double wall uninsulated from the stove to near the first ceiling, but you should be double wall insulated pipe above that.
    Yeah, I definitely figured insulated pipe from the ceiling, or 6 inches below, up into and through the second floor and roof. I just didn't know if I needed it above that. The bottom line is I definitely want to do it right and I don't want some hodgepodge BS job. We really don't ever plan on selling the cabin, we'll probably just leave it to the kids and hope that they don't sell it for drugs (along with my bamboo flyrod's and firearms), but I still want to do it correctly and safe.


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    Default Best place to get 6&quot; double wall stove pipe

    My opinion, including my experience is to ensure the pipe is as insulated as possible at all points were the exiting gasses/smoke can cool down.

    Keeping the smoke hot when it gets outside, and even angles inside the house (if a long distance from the stove) will allow the smoke to cool and deposit creosote. That, IMO, is the primary concern, especially with Alaskas low BTU fuel and when burned slow and low overnight.
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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Default Best place to get 6&quot; double wall stove pipe

    That makes sense. The pipe will be straight, without any bends/angles, and I plan to burn coal for the most part, I don't know if that makes a whole lot of difference. The stove that I have was made in West Germany right after WWII and I believe it is was made primarily for coal but wood can also be burned in it.


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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Troutbum View Post
    Yeah, I definitely figured insulated pipe from the ceiling, or 6 inches below, up into and through the second floor and roof. I just didn't know if I needed it above that. The bottom line is I definitely want to do it right and I don't want some hodgepodge BS job. We really don't ever plan on selling the cabin, we'll probably just leave it to the kids and hope that they don't sell it for drugs (along with my bamboo flyrod's and firearms), but I still want to do it correctly and safe.
    You could try to cobble (and it would be a cobble, because the product's not designed to do it) back to single wall for that last few feet, and maybe save $150, but I believe you'd regret it. Single wall has poor wind resistance, and 5 feet of it above the roof will be flimsy. Single wall sheds heat fast, meaning that last section will run cold; you'll get lots of creosote buildup in that section that you wouldn't get otherwise...

    On the point of creosote: With EXCEL, if you burn DRY wood (and preferably not exclusively pitchy spruce, run a clean burning stove and operate it so it does in fact burn cleanly, you virtually never have to clean your pipe. I'm NOT advocating you or anyone neglect cleaning their pipe!! I'm just saying that EXCEL effectively keeps internal pipe temps up, and that keeps deposits down. I have a 13' run, and I sweep it once a year (usually) just on principle, but it never really needs it.

    On design: If at all possible, I try to design so my pipe exits the roof right next to the ridge line. That keeps the maximum amount of pipe (and that means more heat) inside the structure; it keeps the pipe rise above the roof line to a minimum; eliminates issues with wind load and with snow load above the pipe; eliminates the need for bracing; makes it safe and easy to reach over/into the pipe for sweeping; makes flashing the roof penetration a snap; etc.
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    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by iofthetaiga View Post
    You could try to cobble (and it would be a cobble, because the product's not designed to do it) back to single wall for that last few feet, and maybe save $150, but I believe you'd regret it. Single wall has poor wind resistance, and 5 feet of it above the roof will be flimsy. Single wall sheds heat fast, meaning that last section will run cold; you'll get lots of creosote buildup in that section that you wouldn't get otherwise...

    On the point of creosote: With EXCEL, if you burn DRY wood (and preferably not exclusively pitchy spruce, run a clean burning stove and operate it so it does in fact burn cleanly, you virtually never have to clean your pipe. I'm NOT advocating you or anyone neglect cleaning their pipe!! I'm just saying that EXCEL effectively keeps internal pipe temps up, and that keeps deposits down. I have a 13' run, and I sweep it once a year (usually) just on principle, but it never really needs it.
    Thank you, good information. The first house I ever own up here had a standard fireplace and straight flu out the chimney. I didn't use the fire place a great deal, like maybe a couple dozen times a year, and pretty much only burned spruce in it, but when I got ready to sell it after having owned the place for 13 years, I had the chimney swept, or attempted to have the chimney swept, because the guy came out, took a look and said there was nothing he could do, it was pretty much clean as a whistle.


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    Member akriverunner's Avatar
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    You want black double wall to your first ceiling, usually one telescoping piece that connects to stove. Then from either ceiling through second floor or through the roof and out has to be insulated. For code in an upstairs floor it has to be enclosed also if you are having any inspections or will be selling on the near future.


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    Quote Originally Posted by akriverunner View Post
    You want black double wall to your first ceiling, usually one telescoping piece that connects to stove. Then from either ceiling through second floor or through the roof and out has to be insulated. For code in an upstairs floor it has to be enclosed also if you are having any inspections or will be selling on the near future.


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    I had a feeling that code would mean building a chase around it. That's interesting though as the metalbestos insulated pipe I have used you could always put your hand on it no matter how hot the fire....

    So get your hammer and nails out too Bum...!!!......lol
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  19. #19
    Member AK Troutbum's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 4merguide View Post
    I had a feeling that code would mean building a chase around it. That's interesting though as the metalbestos insulated pipe I have used you could always put your hand on it no matter how hot the fire....

    So get your hammer and nails out too Bum...!!!......lol
    Yeah, I'm okay with boxing it in upstairs but I thought that I could run just singlewall pipe right off of the stove. I know I've seen that done before but maybe it wasn't up to code. It seems like it would be a good idea to radiate as much heat as possible off that pipe coming off the stove. I don't really see how it could be unsafe, I mean the stove itself will be hot, what's the difference if the initial pipe is also? I plan on building a nice hearth and having the proper distance off the wall.


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    Member cdubbin's Avatar
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    Lots of misinformation on chimney installs online...stick with the manufacturer's manual and you will be fine. I prefer Selkirk to Excel...used to be a place down on Post Rd sold it cheap I think...
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