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Thread: Fall brown bear hide care

  1. #1

    Default Fall brown bear hide care

    i am planning a fall brown bear hunt with my brothers for 2017, plenty of time for planning and I want to be sure to learn how to take care of our hides. We are doing a DIY hunt with a transporter dropping and picking us up, planning on 10 days field hunting and would like advice and/or resources on properly taking care of and bears taken until pickup.
    We will be flying out and have weight restrictions so I don't think enough salt is an option, what have others done and what would be suggested for hide care if we happen to get one early in the hunt? Any advice or suggestions would be greatly appreciated also any other advice that might be useful would be awesome, I really would like to try and take one with a bow but my brothers will use rifles. We are new to bear hunting but hope to make it a good experience with plenty of planning.

  2. #2
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    Take enough salt. Even if you have to use a larger plane or schedule an extra flight.

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    Sponsor protaxidermy's Avatar
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    Skin it out as quikly as possible>>>> INCLUDING THE HEAD<<<<< so it can have a chance to cool & not build heat.

    Take every bit of salt that you can.

    You can get away with 25 lbs if you use it right & be able to keep a couple bears from spoiling >>> IF THEY ARE FLESHED PROPPERLY.

    Spread the salt all over the skin , Even if it is just a thin layer. The next morning use the Water that pools up on the skin to salt any areas that didn't get covered very good >>> ITS SALT WATER AT THIS POINT.

    Let the skin dry as good as possible.

    If a second Bear is taken Shake ALL of the salt off the first one onto the second one.

    Yes it will be wet salt & in some cases Watery. Use it anyways.

    A Little salt beats the heck out of none at all.

    We have done this several times including last year on Two Lifesize Sheep & never had any slipping or spoiled skin.

    RJ Simington
    PRO Taxidermy Fairbanks
    ww.protaxidermy.com
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    RJ Simington
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  4. #4

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    Take salt, at least 25 pounds per bear. If you don't already have skinning experience, learn how to skin out toes down to the last joint, split lips, and turn ears. All these steps must be done properly unless you don't mind a bear mount with no hair on the ears and toes. Visit a local taxidermy shop and offer to pay if necessary for good instruction. They'll probably be happy to give you instructions in the hope that you take them your bear later.

  5. #5
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    Before I salt I open a hide up flesh side up and make sure it cools good before I salt and roll. If I have a tarp I salt and let it lay open. Put a branch on the hide to hold the tarp up so air can get in.
    If it's warm the air will help evaporate the moisture from the salt, giving you dry salt for bear number 2.
    It its freezing at night, get that hide open and let it get cold. I've gone over a week without salting just keeping a hide cold. Open at night, roll it during the day.
    I have no experience with other hide preservatives other than salt. Salt = cheap insurance.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
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    I would recommend Larry Bartlett's DVD set "Wilderness Taxidermy". Mike may have it in the store here & if not you can get it at Pristine Ventures.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
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    Member Roland on the River's Avatar
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    very IMPORTANT TO TURN LIPS, EARS AND DON'T FORGET THE NOSE. gOOD LUCK WITH YOUR PLANS.
    Quote Originally Posted by wags View Post
    Take salt, at least 25 pounds per bear. If you don't already have skinning experience, learn how to skin out toes down to the last joint, split lips, and turn ears. All these steps must be done properly unless you don't mind a bear mount with no hair on the ears and toes. Visit a local taxidermy shop and offer to pay if necessary for good instruction. They'll probably be happy to give you instructions in the hope that you take them your bear later.

  8. #8
    Member Lone Wolf1's Avatar
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    This is a good DVD if you can find a copy:

    http://www.alaskaangler.com/store/p6...7s_Bears_.html

    "Skinning and Field Care of Alaska Bears" by Chris Batin. It documents a Kodiak hunt, with pretty good tips (a few minor things in the video may differ from how your taxidermist prefers things).

    Get with YOUR taxidermist in advance to discuss specific preferences and to make sure you have everything lined up when you return from the field!

    Good luck!

  9. #9

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    Thank you all so much, I guess 25 lbs of salt each is a must and leaning to cape. Ordering both the videos suggested, one question I have is can my taxidermist still fix mistakes I make if the hide is salted and dried? I'm sure I will not be doing a bangup job being a newbie.

  10. #10
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Lots of good advice here. I'll toss in a few things.

    First, you do need to stay within the weight limits of your air charter, but at the same time you need salt for your hides. The salt requirements are what they are, and they don't change because the air service doesn't want to haul the weight. If you have to, trim the rest of your load to get within the weight limits, but NEVER let an air service try to tell you what you need for proper trophy care. That's your decision, not theirs.

    Here's a recap of what you need to know how to do. Some of this was covered already, but not all of it in one post, so I'm consolidating it here:

    1. Remove the skull.

    2. Turn the ears.

    3. Turn and split the nose.

    4. Split the lips.

    5. Split the eyelids.

    6. Turn the toes.

    7. Split the tail.

    8. General fleshing of the entire hide.

    9. Salt the entire hide and all crevices, nooks, and crannies.

    10. Fold and roll the hide for the night. Lay the headskin (inside-out) on top of the raw side of the hide. Fold the hide along the spine, with the raw side in contact with the other raw side. Fold the legs over to the center of the hide, and roll it up with the hair out.

    11. Put the hide in a game bag to keep flies from laying eggs in the hair.

    12. Let it sit overnight, in a covered area.

    13. Unroll the hide on a tarp and salt it again.

    14. Roll the hide again, the same way you did the first time.

    15. Place the hide back in the game bag and don't mess with it until you leave the field.

    16. Fly-out day: If you like, and if the hide is leaking salt water, you can unroll it a couple of hours before the plane comes, and shake the salt and salt water out of it, and hang it over a pole to dry a bit. This is not necessary, but it can help keep salt water out of the airplane. Alternatively, you can slide the game bag into a trash bag just before loading it into the airplane.

    I second the recommendation for the video "Wilderness Taxidermy". It's a three-DVD set, and it does an excellent job covering the steps necessary for proper field care. I look at things like this with a critical eye because I don't want folks to make critical mistakes in the field. The only things I saw of concern on this DVD series were omissions. They didn't show how to split the eyelids, they didn't show how to deal with the dewlap on a moose, and they didn't show how to do whole-body skins on ungulates. Other than that, Rich Hamilton of Browtine Taxidermy did a great job covering all the necessary steps in the process. Well done! We have that DVD set in our store AT THIS LINK. $29.95

    While you're watching DVDs, I whole-heartedly recommend Joe Want's DVD seminar on bear hunting, "Success in Brown Bear Hunting". Joe earned his spurs under Pinnell and Talifson in the alder thickets of Kodiak Island. He guided brown bear hunters for forty years and is the most knowledgeable brown bear hunter I know. We have that DVD in the store AT THIS LINK. It's a two-DVD set that lasts three hours and 45 minutes. It's a college course on brown bear hunting tactics and trophy identification. $30.

    While you're at it, you might want to check out our section on field care. Several pages of information in there, including an entire page just on the salt requirements. You can find the home page of that section AT THIS LINK.

    Good hunting!

    -Mike
    LOST CREEK COMPANY: Specializing in Alaska hunt consultation and planning for do-it-yourself hunts, fully outfitted hunts, and guided hunts.
    CLICK HERE to send me a private message.
    Web Address: http://alaskaoutdoorssupersite.com/hunt-planner/
    Mob: 1 (907) 229-4501
    "Dream big, and dare to fail." -Norman Vaughan
    "I have climbed my mountain, but I must still live my life." - Tenzig Norgay

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